Awards for 2015

Robert and Frances Flaherty Prize

WINNER

Cavalo Dinheiro: Pedro Costa
Pedro Costa's Horse Money extends his collaboration with the Capo Verdean immigrants of Fontainhas in a new, surprising direction. The certainties of his earlier films have been stripped away, and what emerges is an incantation, a prayer, a mass, a film of memories we can only partly grasp, a documentary of dreams, a documentary as dream, a ghost story some would say, but certainly a film of astonishing power whose protagonists are the true heroes of our times.

IN-COMPETITION














Prize of Excellence

WINNERS

Homeland (Iraq Year Zero): Abbas Fahdel
What was depicted in the 334 minutes? We saw irreplaceable landscape and time filled with a deep (deep) kindness and sadness. Offering us a glimpse of the Iraqi land and the everyday of a family, of the changes before and after the war-something Japanese television never broadcast-the film's worth as a documentary is ample. Yet the strongest elements of this film are director Abbas Fahdel's loving gaze and the shining presence of children like Hydal. The children continue to live on, inside all people who have seen this film. We are so glad to have seen this film. We express our full admiration for the filmmaker and his family.

Ma'a al-Fidda: Ossama Mohammed, Wiam Bedirxan
Silvered Water extends the possibilities of visual expression to the fullest. In the face of appalling unbearable violence, what can cinema and the filmmaker do? This film, made at the risk of the filmmakers' lives, provides us with an answer. Their film becomes a validation of their lives-something documentary should essentially be. We express our respect for the filmmakers' courage and ability to take action.

Special Prize

WINNER

Nosotras/Ellas: Julia Pesce
Life starts with birth and lasts with death. But this is not what necessarily happens in film. A group of women linked by blood, solidarity and love can tell us a different story.

Ogawa Shinsuke Prize

WINNER

Des hommes debout: Maya Abdul-Malak
An orchestra composed of binary spaces-hidden and visible, private and public, masculine and vulnerable, matriarchal and exiled, city and home, time and continuum, and texts of longing-letters, coffee, cake, telephone . . . and cinema. We are honoured to Award the Ogawa Shinsuke prize to Standing Men by Maya Abdul-Malak for creating a compassionate story of exile and longing with extraordinary cinematic craft.

IN-COMPETITION

















New Asian Currents - Special Mention

WINNERS

Ban-jjag-i-neun bak-su so-ri: Bora Lee-kil
Speaking with silence where words connect worlds comes a sparkling tale of joy and love. The jury Special Mention goes to Glittering Hands by Lee-Kil Bora.

A Report About Mina: Kaveh Mazaheri
From the heart of a city, from amidst poverty, squalor, drugs and crime was created a tale of beauty and dignity. The jury Special Mention goes to A Report about Mina by Kaveh Mazaheri.

Aragane: Kaori Oda
A mesmerising symphony of images and sound drawn from a space: hidden underground, masculine, atavistic and mechanised. The jury Special Mention goes to ARAGANE by Oda Kaori.

Maine Diil Nahin Dekha: Humaira Bilkis
A poetic essay on loneliness in a city masterfully woven together with images of attempts to capture that same city. The jury Special Mention goes to I Am Yet to See Delhi by Humaira Bilkis.

New Asian Currents - Award of Excellence

WINNERS

Snakeskin: Daniel Hui
The Award of Excellence goes to a film that plays with time-it moves back and forth in imagination and memory, accentuating that memory is both imagination and power-questioning and doubting everything, even cinema, and yet creating moments of vulnerable poignancy. We are delighted to award Snakeskin by Daniel Hui for it's courageous steps into the terrain of new cinematic language.

Each Story: Katsuya Okuma
With the dexterity of a football/soccer player, with very little time or cultural familiarity, with deep respect and resonating his own roots, playing with cinematic language, the filmmaker crafts a narrative; a universal prophesy: that of the inevitable loss of culture and roots in the face of globalisation and consequent climate changes in environment, both cultural and physical. We are delighted to give the Award of Excellence to Each Story by Okuma Katsuya for the stories of love he shares with the world.

Citizens' Prize

WINNER

Directors Guild of Japan Award

WINNER

Mayor's Prize

WINNER

El botón de nácar: Patricio Guzmán
We all come from the sea. The ocean is the origin of life and keeps our memories and secrets. Patricio Guzmán's film The Pearl Button proposes that water not only has memory but also has a voice.

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.