19 articles


Fox Sets Ryan Reynolds’ ‘Deadpool 2’ for June 2018

20 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Fox has set “Deadpool 2” for a June 1, 2018, release date — giving the much-anticipated sequel a prime summer opening as the first title to land on the date.

Ryan Reynolds returns as the foul-mouthed superhero with Josh Brolin recently having signed on as Cable. Shooting is expected to start in June.

Reynolds is also a producer on the films with “Deadpool” writers Rhett Reese and Paul Wernick returning along with Drew Goddard assisting. “John Wick” co-director David Leitch came on board to lead “Deadpool 2” last fall after Tim Miller dropped out due to creative differences with Reynolds.

The superhero sequel also recently cast “Atlanta” breakout Zazie Beetz as the mutant mercenary Domino.

Related

Steven Spielberg Pentagon Papers Drama Gets 2017 Oscar Season Release

Deadpool” gave Fox its biggest hit of 2016 after opening on Valentine’s Day to a surprisingly strong $782.6 million worldwide, supplanting “The Matrix Reloaded” to become the highest-grossing R-rated film in history. »


- Dave McNary

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‘The Fate Of The Furious’ Expected To Cross $750M Internationally For Uni Record, $1B Worldwide Next Week

22 hours ago | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Universal Pictures' The Fate of the Furious, which is expected to take in another $35.5M to $36M domestically, has risen to a big $636.3M overseaas. The estimated take for the weekend is $171M as it plays out in its 65 markets. That means it will push past $750M by Sunday, which would be the fastest for any Universal film on that trek. The worldwide total as of this weekend should be in the neighborhood of $912M with the $1B threshold reached by early next week. Like past… »


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Steven Spielberg Pentagon Papers Drama Gets 2017 Oscar Season Release

20 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Steven Spielberg’s untitled Pentagon Papers drama announced itself as a major awards season contender in this year’s Oscars race.

The film, which is rumored to star Tom Hanks and Meryl Streep, will open in limited release on December 22, 2017. It will expand nationwide on January 12, 2018, a week after the Golden Globes broadcast. Hanks will play hard-charging Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee, with Streep handling the role of iron-willed publisher Katharine Graham. The pair made the decision to publish a classified history of the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War over the objections of the Nixon administration. Courageous journalist dramas have played nicely with Oscar voters — 2015’s “Spotlight” won Best Picture, while 2005’s “Good Night and Good Luck” and 1976’s “All the President’s Men” earned a bevy of nominations.

The opening slot puts the Spielberg film in the hunt for Academy Awards gold along with the likes of Alexander Payne’s “Downsizing, »


- Brent Lang

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Martin Scorsese, Leonardo DiCaprio & Robert De Niro May Reteam For ‘Killers Of The Flower Moon’

21 April 2017 4:07 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Leonardo DiCaprio and Martin Scorsese are obviously a little attached at the hip. They’ve made five movies together — “Gangs of New York,“ “The Aviator,” “The Departed,” “Shutter Island” and “The Wolf Of Wall Street” and the short, “The Audition” — but it feels like any time a Scorsese project is announced, DiCaprio’s name is not far behind.

Continue reading Martin Scorsese, Leonardo DiCaprio & Robert De Niro May Reteam For ‘Killers Of The Flower Moon’ at The Playlist. »


- Rodrigo Perez

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Ang Lee Eyes Sci-Fi Actioner ‘Gemini Man’ at Skydance

21 April 2017 6:07 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Ang Lee is in discussions to direct the science-fiction actioner “Gemini Man” for Skydance — a project that’s been in the works for two decades.

Skydance picked up the rights to the project last year. Jerry Bruckheimer is producing and Don Murphy is executive producing. Lee’s rep stressed that the discussions are at an early stage and that official contract negotiations have not yet started.

Lee’s most recent film was “The Long Halftime Walk of Billy Lynn,” for which he used an unprecedented shooting and projection frame rate of 120 frames per second — five times faster than the normal rate of 24 frames per second. He won Academy Awards for directing “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi” and was nominated for “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.”

In  2009, the late Curtis Hanson had been attached to direct from a script by David Benioff, in which an aging Nsa agent tries to retire and is targeted for death. »


- Dave McNary

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Margot Robbie to Play Queen Elizabeth in ‘Mary Queen of Scots’ (Exclusive)

21 April 2017 3:33 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Margot Robbie is in negotiations to play Queen Elizabeth in Focus and Working Title’s “Mary Queen of Scots,” opposite Saoirse Ronan.

Josie Rourke is directing the film with Working Title’s Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner and Liza Chasin producing.

The movie is based on the true story of Mary Stuart’s attempt to overthrow her cousin Elizabeth I, Queen of England, only to find herself condemned to years of imprisonment before facing execution.

The film has yet to be greenlit, but sources say things are headed in the right direction. If a greenlight is given, the film would likely go sometime later this year.

Following the success of big hits like last summer’s “Suicide Squad” and “Wolf of Wall Street,” this latest role gives Robbie a prestige part to add to her portfolio. The endeavor could even have awards season potential given Focus’ track record of pushing Oscar campaigns for its prestige film. »


- Justin Kroll

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Sophie Okonedo: ‘My body is my barometer – my instincts are physical’

6 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The celebrated actor on her new play with Damian Lewis, why performing is an adventure, and leaving London for the country

Sophie Okonedo was born in 1968 in London and studied at Rada. She has worked extensively across theatre, film and TV and was nominated for a best supporting actress Oscar for the 2004 film Hotel Rwanda. On Broadway, she won a Tony award in 2014 for A Raisin in the Sun and two years later was nominated for her performance in Arthur Miller’s The Crucible. Her TV credits include The Slap, Undercover and The Hollow Crown. She is currently performing alongside Damian Lewis in Edward Albee’s 2002 play The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia?; she plays Stevie, a woman who discovers her husband is having an affair with an animal.

What was your first reaction on reading The Goat?

I thought I was due a break from theatre, because I’ve been doing a lot, »

- Holly Williams

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Their Finest review – sharp wartime romance

6 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Gemma Arterton shines in a big-hearted and witty drama about the making of a second world war propaganda film

London, 1940. Catrin (Gemma Arterton) is scurrying home through the blitzed streets at dusk. Without warning, she is sideswiped by a bomb blast. Blinking grit from her eyes, she stumbles into a pile of broken bodies. Her initial horror tips into laughter when she realises that they are shop mannequins. Then she notices that one of them is bleeding – a salesgirl lies amid the wreckage of the window display. While the dust and death is still clearing from the air, Catrin vomits from shock, silhouetted in a yawning archway.

The scene elegantly combines twin themes in this bracing second world war romance from Lone Scherfig. It captures the savage uncertainty of life during wartime; and, in a nod to the film’s movie industry backdrop, it deftly peels back layers of reality and artifice. »

- Wendy Ide

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Tribeca Film Review: ‘The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson’

6 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Even in persecuted communities, there are hierarchies of marginalization, and “The Death and Life of Marsha P. Johnson” argues that, with regards to the Lgbt movement of the past few decades, the most ostracized and demonized faction continues to be transgender people. Driven by both empathy and a passion for justice, “How to Survive a Plague” director David France’s stellar documentary charts an investigation into the still-unsolved death of trans icon Marsha P. Johnson, along the way illuminating the persistent discrimination that exists today, and the bonds of community designed to counter it. Deriving additional emotional power from its formal beauty, it should be one of the signature breakouts from this year’s Tribeca Film Festival.

A veteran of the Stonewall riots and a fixture of New York’s Greenwich Village gay scene, Marsha P. Johnson (“The Rosa Parks of the Lgbt movement”) was a friendly, vivacious transvestite beloved »


- Nick Schager

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Tramps; Sand Castle; Madame Bovary; Salt and Fire and more – review

7 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

‘Straight to Netflix’ needn’t be a derogatory term – there are still gems to be found on the streaming platform

“If a movie premieres on Netflix, is it still even a movie?” asked the American film critic David Ehrlich last week, stoking an ongoing, still-heated industry debate over the streaming giant’s handling of the new films it exclusively acquires, making them skip the cinema circuit entirely. For more tradition-bound cinephiles, “straight to Netflix” has the same stigma “straight to video” once did, though in the case of so-called Netflix Originals such as Adam Leon’s Tramps, it really shouldn’t.

Leon turned heads at Cannes a few years ago with his sparky urban caper Gimme the Loot; his equally bright-eyed but more woozily romantic follow-up confirms that promise. Like Leon’s debut, it’s a lively run around the fringes of New York City. Callum Turner and Grace Van Patten, »

- Guy Lodge

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La 92 review – unedifying Los Angeles riots documentary

7 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A rather flat account of the week of violence that gripped the Us city 25 years ago

To mark 25 years since the Los Angeles riots, Dan Lindsay and Tj Martin put together archive footage comprising newsreels and home videos that document the city-wide carnage that followed two major events in 1991: the fatal shooting of African-American teenager Latasha Harlins by a Korean corner store clerk and, six months later, the brutal beating of African-American Rodney King by four white police officers, caught on video tape. The clerk was convicted but served no jail time; the police officers were initially acquitted. Violence, arson and looting ensued. The use of archive without voiceover means there’s a flatness to the way the events are presented; La 92 shows how these events were reported on TV but lacks its own commentary. It’s an immersive if not particularly edifying experience.

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- Simran Hans

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Rules Don’t Apply review – fast-moving, fun in Howard Hughes’s Hollywood

7 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Warren Beatty’s first film in 15 years has a wonderful romcom, featuring Lily Collins and Alden Ehrenreich, at its centre

Though he’s written, directed and produced several films, Warren Beatty is first and foremost a movie star. His first film in 15 years is about movies and movie stars; he centres actors in the frame, knowing when to hold on their faces and let their expressions carry a scene. Lily Collins and Alden Ehrenreich are almost too good here; too beautiful and too precise. It’s Beatty who is the main event, delivering an inward-looking performance, casting himself as the eccentric, increasingly erratic Howard Hughes, and even writing himself a sex scene (an invocation of Beatty’s promiscuous star persona, perhaps).

Looser, weirder and more fun than a big-budget biopic might purport to be, it takes place in Hughes’s Hollywood. The aviation junkie and billionaire film-maker was an enigma »

- Simran Hans

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The Transfiguration review – drab horror

7 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

An unhappy marriage of indie arthouse movie and slasher flick, lacking the conviction of either genre

A friendless, orphaned teenager who lives alone with his ex-army older brother, Milo (Eric Ruffin) likes long walks, vintage horror movies and eating human flesh. He finds a companion in new neighbour Sophie (Chloe Levine), a loner with psoriasis and a tangle of curly hair. The two bond over their dead parents, flaneuring the outskirts of Brooklyn and cosying up in Milo’s apartment to watch graphic YouTube clips of animals being slaughtered. It’s all very cute. These scenes alternate with Milo’s secret kills; moments of gory violence signposted by buzzing, electronic sound design.

With its handheld tracking shots, soft lighting and long stretches of silence, the film mostly positions itself as an indie drama, though it takes great pains to namedrop its bloodsucker references (Martin, Nosferatu, Let the Right One In »

- Simran Hans

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Unforgettable review – Katherine Heigl finally gets her revenge

7 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The ultimate uptight blond turns psychotic ex-wife in a silly thriller that tries – and heroically fails – to be the new Fatal Attraction

Poor Katherine Heigl has been typecast as the uptight blond (think the unfortunate trifecta of Knocked Up, 27 Dresses and The Ugly Truth). Here, she at least has fun with that typecasting as tightly wound and sleekly coiffed troublemaker Tessa. A Bay Area psycho Barbie, Tessa is determined to make life difficult for her beer-brewing, rent-a-hunk, ex-husband’s (Geoff Stults) new girlfriend, Julia (a heroic Rosario Dawson, playing it as straight as the hammy script will allow). Enjoyable, too, is the inversion of the black best friend trope, with Julia’s supportive, zany bestie played by Whitney Cummings of 2 Broke Girls.

Movie super-producer Denise Di Novi’s directorial debut casts itself as an erotic thriller in the tradition of Fatal Attraction; to me, it had more in common with »

- Simran Hans

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The Zookeeper’s Wife review – sanitised wartime drama

7 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Jessica Chastain stars as a Warsaw animal lover who saved hundreds of Jewish people from the Nazis

Jessica Chastain’s Antonina Zabiński is “a magician” with animals in Niki Caro’s tidy Holocaust drama. When her husband’s Warsaw Zoo is bombed, it’s unsparingly brutal; bloodied polar bears are left slumped over rocks, a slain bison is lowered into a pit. A visit from Hitler’s head zoologist, Lutz Heck (Daniel Brühl, deliciously creepy as the animal eugenics enthusiast), confirms the destroyed zoo must be liquidated for the war effort, though Zabiński and her husband convince him to let them convert it into a pig farm and then smuggle some 300 Jews into safekeeping under his nose.

Whether she’s up to her elbows in elephant gunk helping to resuscitate a newborn or snuggling with lion cubs, Antonina’s animal-loving tendencies don’t discriminate between species. It’s odd, then, »

- Simran Hans

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The Happiest Day in the Life of Olli Mäki review – a knockout boxing movie

7 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

A charming tale about a featherweight uncomfortable with the unexpected burden of being a national hero

Set in the 1960s and shot in black and white on gorgeous, grainy 16mm, Juho Kuosmanen’s charming slice-of-life drama is a warm, welcome sideways look at the Finnish featherweight boxing champion Olli Mäki. Kuosmanen’s camera follows Mäki (Jarrko Lahti) documentary-style, keeping pace while he trains for a high-profile fight with an American opponent and embarks on the ensuing publicity tour. But the ever-modest Mäki is uncomfortable with his newfound status as national hero, and would prefer to spend his off-time with  girlfriend, Raija (Oona Airola, lovely and low key). The film is at its most fun outside the ring and spending time with the couple: at a wedding in the rural village of Kokkola; night swimming; she riding on the handlebars of his bike and laughing.

Continue reading »

- Simran Hans

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‘Fate Of The Furious’ Drives Five Wide Releases Off The Road With $38M+ Second Weekend – Sat. Pm Update

7 hours ago | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Write-thru, Sat. Pm: In recent memory, this has happened over the last two years: Following a huge Easter weekend, the box office goes sideways and this year we have five wide releases — Warner Bros.’ Unforgettable ($4.7M), Disneynature's Born in China ($5M+), Open Road's The Promise ($4M),  Cinelou/Scott Free's Phoenix Forgotten ($1.7M) and A24's Free Fire ($900K to $1M)— that are being run over by Universal’s The Fate of the Furious, which will cross the No. 1 finish… »


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‘Veep’ Review: A Big List of the Ways Women in Politics Get F***ed, and Not in a Good Way

11 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Immediate Reaction:

Oh, Amy. After warning Selina against Andrew’s toxic charms, Buddy Calhoun’s campaign manager and girlfriend became the “Lobotomy Barbie” she cautioned her old boss about, standing by her man as he apologized for making an ass of himself — and a joke of their sex life in the process. Both women got screwed by their chosen men, and not in a way they enjoy.

But the fuck-over-y (ovary?) didn’t end there. Selina was spurned by her fellow ex-presidents (all male) at the opening of President Hughes’ library. She, in turn, dismissed the idea of a female architect, telling Gary, “We’re not redoing a kitchen here,” while Marjorie and Catherine lamented the fact they need a man to have a baby. And of course, Selina ended up getting doubly boned by Andrew, first upon learning of his betrayal and then by the woman he cheated with, »


- Ben Travers

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Film Review: ‘A Suitable Girl’

11 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In America, marriage is thought of as a union that brings families together, but according to “A Suitable Girl,” in India, it’s a time of great loss for women and their parents and siblings. A stark look at that country’s ongoing clash between modernity and tradition when it comes to female independence (or lack thereof), Sarita Khurana and Smriti Mundhra’s heartbreaking documentary focuses on three single ladies struggling to cope with the pervasive pressure to find a spouse. Stirring in its examination of ingrained sociocultural sexism, and the toll it takes on entire families, the film seems likely to appeal to a significant audience following its premiere at this year’s Tribeca Film Festival.

In Delhi, 30-year-old Dipti spends her days and nights searching for a mate with the aid of her doting parents, to little avail — a situation that one dating-service employee blames on her weight, »


- Nick Schager

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‘Doctor Who’ Review: Bill Continues to Make Us ‘Smile’ Despite Creepy-Cute Emojibots

11 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: The following review of “Doctor Who” Season 10, Episode 2, “Smile,” contains spoilers.]

The Rundown

The Doctor and Bill’s chemistry continued to be perfect even though this was only their first official adventure together. Taking place millennia into the future and on a far-off planet that appeared ideal except for its lack of inhabitants, the episode sneaked in an examination of human nature and cultural fluency within its murder-mystery trappings. This jaunt wasn’t so much about whodunit but why, and despite the “robots taking over” plot, it was the human colonists’ reaction the gave us chills.

Read More: ‘Doctor Who’: The Next Doctor Rumored to Be ‘Chewing Gum’s’ Black Female Star

Here Be Monsters

What’s worse than a man telling a woman to smile? A robot demanding you smile or else it will kill you and use your bones for calcified fertilizer. Regardless, forcing a smile under duress is just psychologically disturbing even if you don’t factor murder into it. »


- Hanh Nguyen

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