14 articles


Busan: Korea’s ‘After My Death,’ Iran’s ‘Blockage’ Win Competition

6 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Films from South Korea and Iran were announced Saturday as joint winners of the Busan Film Festival’s main competition section.

Kim Ui-seok’s “After My Death” and Mohsen Gharaei’s “Blockage” won the New Currents competition which focuses on first and second features by filmmakers from Asia.

“My Death” is critique of the world where reason and tolerance have no sway and is the story of a girl who is suspected of having goaded another schoolgirl into killing herself. “Blockage” reflects the current economic condition of Iran by depicting the overwhelming chaos that happens to a vicious, despicable temporary worker.

The jury was headed by American filmmaker Oliver Stone, and included Iranian director Bahman Ghobadi, French cinematographer Agnes Godard, Philippines’ Lav Diaz and South Korea’s Jang Sun-woo. The jury said that “both films are tightly scripted, and display vivid detail and excellent craftsmanship.”

The first Kim Ji-seok Award, a newly prize »


- Sonia Kil

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‘Chappaquiddick’ Moves Out of the Crowded Awards Season — Exclusive

9 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

When Byron Allen’s Entertainment Studios, riding high after the early hit “47 Meters Down,” bought “Chappaquiddick” and “Hostiles” out of Toronto, it looked like they might provide direct competitors for a Best Actor Oscar slot. Now Scott Cooper’s $50-million western “Hostiles,” which earned upbeat reviews and press out of Telluride and Tiff, is heading for a December release and an Oscar campaign for Christian Bale.

Chappaquiddick,” however, will have to wait.

John Curran’s “Chappaquiddick” (a $4 million pickup, with a $16 million P&A) will wisely hold off for a 2018 release on April 6. Jason Clarke would have not only been competing with Bale for a Best Actor slot, but also with himself in Dee Rees’s southern drama “Mudbound” (November 17, Netflix).

Read More:‘Chappaquiddick’ Review: Jason Clarke Excels in Compelling Teddy Kennedy Biopic That Pulls No Punches Related storiesAFI Fest Adds Galas: 'Call Me by Your Name,' 'The Disaster Artist, »


- Anne Thompson

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'Geostorm': What The Critics Are Saying

15 hours ago | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

So: How bad is Geostorm?

The Hollywood Reporter's John DeFore seems to suggest that it's pretty bad. In a review that describes the movie as "big, dumb, and boring," Dean Devlin's weather horror flick comes across as being … not necessarily the best, shall we say.

"Viewers may have been drawn in by ads featuring tsunamis in Dubai and killer hail in Tokyo. But most of the body of the film consists of people logging into servers, talking about encryption, and reviewing surveillance footage," DeFore complained, but the disappointment goes beyond a lack of disaster porn. Describing Jim Sturgess' »


- Graeme McMillan

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‘Blade Runner’ Breakout Sylvia Hoeks Joins ‘Girl With the Dragon Tattoo’ Sequel (Exclusive)

15 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

After breaking out in “Blade Runner 2049,” Sylvia Hoeks is looking to move on to another franchise revamp.

The Dutch actress is in talks to join Claire Foy in Sony’s “The Girl in the Spider’s Web,” the sequel to “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo.”

Foy, who stars in the Netflix series “The Crown,” is on board to play Lisbeth Salander. The new installment of Sony Pictures’ Millennium franchise will commence production in January in Berlin and Stockholm. The film hits theaters on Oct. 19, 2018.

The studio had no comment on the casting. »


- Justin Kroll

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‘Boo 2! A Madea Halloween’ Haunts Thursday Box Office With $760,000

20 hours ago | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Tyler Perry’s “Boo 2! A Madea Halloween” scared up $760,000 at Thursday previews. The Lionsgate release is projected to top this weekend box office with $20 million to $22 million from 2,500 locations, with Lionsgate projecting a start on the lower end of that range. That would be a step down from the $28 million opening for last year’s “Boo!,” which opened to $855,000 at the Thursday previews and went on to gross $73 million. But with a reported budget of $20 million, this will still be a strong opening for Perry’s ninth Madea film, which he wrote and directed. »


- Beatrice Verhoeven

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‘The Snowman’ With Michael Fassbender Gets Panned and Director Says He Knows Why

20 hours ago | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Michael Fassbender’s “The Snowman,” opening this weekend, got killed by critics, and director Tomas Alfredson says he has an idea about what went wrong with the thriller. “Our shoot time in Norway was way too short,” the Swedish director told the Norwegian Broadcasting Corporation, which was then translated by The Independent. “We didn’t get the whole story with us and when we started cutting we discovered that a lot was missing. It’s like when you’re making a big jigsaw puzzle and a few pieces are missing so you don’t see the whole picture.” He added »


- Beatrice Verhoeven

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Tony Zierra to Follow up ‘Filmworker’ with New Stanley Kubrick Doc about ‘Eyes Wide Shut’

33 minutes ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Lyon  — Tony Zierra, the director of this year’s critically acclaimed Cannes screener “Filmworker” – about Leon Vitali, who served for decades as Stanley Kubrick’s right-hand man – is working on a followup Kubrick documentary about the making of the 1999 drama “Eyes Wide Shut,” starring Tom Cruise and Nicole Kidman.

Zierra was in Lyon this week for a screening of “Filmworker” at the Lumière Film Festival, where the documentary has generated massive buzz.

Speaking to Variety about his next project, “SK13,” (“Eyes Wide Shut” being Kubrick’s 13th film), Zierra explained that he was originally working on that documentary when he met Vitali and decided to put it aside and do “Filmworker” first.

Zierra is now returning to his initial project, which promises an inside look at what is arguably  Kubrick’s most controversial work, due in part to the director’s death during post-production.

“The one movie that I feel is the wrinkle in Kubrick’s filmography »


- Ed Meza

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William Friedkin on the Power of Film, Capital Punishment and his Recklessness on ‘The French Connection’

1 hour ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Lyon  — Director William Friedkin, maker of “The French Connection” and “The Exorcist,” in Lyon for a showcase of his work, proved his storytelling prowess at a master class on Thursday as he captivated the audience with anecdotes of his illustrious career.

Particularly moving was the account of his first work, the 1962 documentary “The People vs. Paul Crump.”

After meeting the chaplain of the Cook County jail and learning about a young black man on death row named Paul Crump that both the pastor and the warden believed to be innocent, Friedkin visited the inmate and likewise became convinced of his innocence. He set out to make a documentary about the case in the hope of saving his life.

“A confession was beaten out of him by the Chicago police, which was done routinely in those days. If there was an African American accused of a crime they would go into the African American community and round up the »


- Ed Meza

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Sexism and the music doc: 'Grace Jones has had her 15 minutes'

2 hours ago | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Why Bloodlight and Bami bucks the cliched trend that’s haunted films about Whitney Houston and Amy Winehouse

Related: Grace Jones and giant confetti cannons: the 20 biggest festival moments of 2017

The tragic downfall of a celebrity ingenue: a trusted, market-friendly formula for the big screen, especially where female recording artists are concerned. Documentaries about female stars tend to tread a similar narrative, involving a reductive look at personal histories, where the film-maker is less interested in the idea of accomplished musicians than of girls who supposedly dreamed too big and self-destructed through addiction and failed relationships. With this mythologising, you might say that Amy Winehouse (Asif Kapadia’s Amy), Whitney Houston (Nick Broomfield’s Whitney: Can I Be Me), Nina Simone ( Liz Garbus and Hal Tulchin’s What Happened Miss Simone?) and Janis Joplin (Amy Berg’s Janis: Little Girl Blue) have been made more alike in death than in life. »

- Carmen Gray

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Wong Kar-wai Honored in Lyon, Talks Early Influences, Bruce Lee, Hong Kong Handover and Bigger Canvas for ‘Grandmaster’

4 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Lyon The Lumière Festival honored Wong Kar-wai with the Lumière Award on Friday following a wide-ranging discussion between the Chinese filmmaker and the festival director Thierry Frémaux about his life and career.

Asked about his early influences during the master class, held in front of a packed house at the majestic Théâtre des Célestins ahead of the evening’s award ceremony, Wong said he moved with his family from Shanghai to Hong Kong as a child in 1962 before the onset of the Cultural Revolution. Since the family had no friends or relatives in Hong Kong and did not speak Cantonese, Wong regularly went to the movies with his mother.

“It’s all because of my mother. My mother is a big film buff – she enjoyed watching movies. The fact that we didn’t have any friends and relatives in this new city, the only thing she liked to do was take me to the cinema. We spent almost »


- Ed Meza

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‘Boo 2! A Madea Halloween’ Reaps $22M During October Dumping Ground At The B.O.

4 hours ago | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

3rd Update, Saturday 12:03Am: What’s up with late October at the box office? If the first weekend of May is known as the official launch of summer, and guarantees a $100M-plus opening title, then the third and even fourth weekend of October can officially be known as a dumping ground for mediocre, broken movies. No disrespect to Lionsgate’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween. That film is absolutely working, stoking its audience and winning the weekend off a respectable low $20M… »


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Film Review: ‘Same Kind of Different as Me’

4 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In 1998, millionaire art dealer Ron Hall, a Fort Worth father of two and an adulterer, promised he’d do anything to win back his wife Debbie, a “girl with a heart so big that all of Texas couldn’t hold it.”   Debbie gave him a challenge: help her feed the homeless at Fort Worth’s Union Gospel Mission and befriend the scariest man on the block, an ex-felon and murderer named Denver “Suicide” Moore. He did, and the two men’s unusual friendship is the foundation of Michael Carney’s empathetic faith-based drama “Same Kind of Different as Me,” starring Greg Kinnear and Renée Zellweger as the wealthy white couple, and Djimon Hounsou as the traumatized sharecropper welcomed into their 15,000-square-foot home. The three leads have six Academy Awards nominations between them. However, the film’s key draw is the nonfiction bestseller that inspired it, co-written by Hall, Moore and “Heaven is For Real’s” Lynn Vincent, who saw »


- Peter Debruge

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Film Review: Pixar’s ‘Coco’

8 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Conceived as a vibrant celebration of Mexican culture, writer-director Lee Unkrich’s “Coco” is the 19th feature from Pixar Animation Studios and the first to seriously deal with the deficit of nonwhite characters in its films — so far limited to super-sidekick Frozone in “The Incredibles,” tagalong Russell in “Up” and Mindy Kaling’s green-skinned Disgust in “Inside Out.” It’s a point worth making from the outset, not so much for political reasons (although they matter) but to indicate how this effective yet hardly exceptional addition to the Pixar oeuvre finds at least one significant front on which to innovate, even while coloring comfortably within the lines on practically everything else.

Like Remy, the rodent hero of “Ratatouille” who dreamed of working in a French restaurant, 12-year-old Miguel Rivera (voiced by Anthony Gonzalez) has just one passion in life: He wants to play the guitar. Unfortunately for him, Miguel belongs to a family of humble shoemakers where music »


- Peter Debruge

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‘Chappaquiddick’ Moves Out of the Crowded Awards Season — Exclusive

9 hours ago | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

When Byron Allen’s Entertainment Studios, riding high after the early hit “47 Meters Down,” bought “Chappaquiddick” and “Hostiles” out of Toronto, it looked like they might provide direct competitors for a Best Actor Oscar slot. Now Scott Cooper’s $50-million western “Hostiles,” which earned upbeat reviews and press out of Telluride and Tiff, is heading for a December release and an Oscar campaign for Christian Bale.

Chappaquiddick,” however, will have to wait.

John Curran’s “Chappaquiddick” (a $4 million pickup, with a $16 million P&A) will wisely hold off for a 2018 release on April 6. Jason Clarke would have not only been competing with Bale for a Best Actor slot, but also with himself in Dee Rees’s southern drama “Mudbound” (November 17, Netflix).

Read More:‘Chappaquiddick’ Review: Jason Clarke Excels in Compelling Teddy Kennedy Biopic That Pulls No Punches Related storiesAFI Fest Adds Galas: 'Call Me by Your Name,' 'The Disaster Artist, »


- Anne Thompson

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Film News Roundup: Paul Allen’s Vulcan Productions Backs Oliver Sacks Documentary

10 hours ago | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

In today’s film news roundup, Paul Allen comes on board an Oliver Sacks documentary, the Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival unveils its lineup, and animation veteran Teresa Cheng gets a USC post.

Documentary Backing

Paul G. Allen’s Vulcan Productions is backing the documentary “Oliver Sacks: His Own Life” in partnership with Steeplechase Films, American Masters Pictures, Motto Pictures, Passion Pictures, and Tangled Bank Studios.

Directed by filmmaker Ric Burns (“New York,” “Andy Warhol”), the film attempts to provide an exploration of human consciousness and the intimate relationship between art and science. Burns shot footage in the months before Sacks died in 2015, including more than 80 hours with the physician himself, his partner, and his closest family, friends, and colleagues.

Allen and Carole Tomko, general manager of Vulcan Productions, are executive producers of “Oliver Sacks: His Own Life,” along with Julie Goldman of Motto Pictures and Michael Kantor of American Masters Pictures. Vulcan said Friday »


- Dave McNary

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‘The Good Doctor’ Is Now Bigger Than ‘NCIS’ and ‘This Is Us,’ By a Hair — Ratings Watch

11 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The Nielsen “Doctor” is in. After three weeks of the new season, the ABC drama “The Good Doctor” appears to be a bonafide hit for the network.

According to the latest Nielsen data covering three days’ worth of time-shifting (including DVR and video on demand viewing), “The Good Doctor” is averaging 16.42 million viewers — making it not just TV’s most-watched new drama, but TV’s most-watched drama, period. That’s because after three weeks, “The Good Doctor” is just a smidge above CBS’ perennial powerhouse “NCIS” (16.35 million) and NBC’s emotional juggernaut “This Is Us” (16.19 million).

The show, starring Freddie Highmore as a high-functioning autistic physician, is also the fall’s No. 1 freshman drama and top-rated 10 p.m. series among Adults 18-49 (3.7 rating).

Read More:‘The Good Doctor’ Is Destroying One Misconception About Autism at a Time

David Shore executive produces “The Good Doctor,” which is based on a South Korean format, »


- Michael Schneider

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Harvey Weinstein Has “Different Recollection” Of Events In Lupita Nyong’o Op-Ed

11 hours ago | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

A spokesperson for Harvey Weinstein said the producer “has a different recollection of the events” that came to light in a New York Times op-ed piece penned by Oscar-winning actress Lupita Nyong’o. The comments came a day after the essay appeared in which she detailed a series of alleged Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment encounters that included several explicit passes Weinstein tried to foist on her early in her career. “Mr. Weinstein has a different recollection of the… »


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Superhero Bits: Shazam Crew Expands, New Green Arrow Suits Up, Gotham by Gaslight & More

11 hours ago | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Who will be the new Green Arrow on the next episode of the sixth season of Arrow? Who has joined the Shazam crew as director of photography and costume designer? What did Josh Brolin think of the first footage he saw of himself as Thanos? Why don’t we ever see Avengers Tower in The Defenders? […]

The post Superhero Bits: Shazam Crew Expands, New Green Arrow Suits Up, Gotham by Gaslight & More appeared first on /Film. »


- Ethan Anderton

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