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Quentin Tarantino Chooses Sony Pictures to Produce and Distribute His Ninth Feature Film

4 hours ago

Quentin Tarantino has made his final decision and will be taking his ninth feature to Sony Pictures, Deadline reports. The movie represents the first time in Tarantino’s career that he will be making a film outside of Miramax or the Weinstein Company.

Following multiple allegations of sexual harassment and abuse against Harvey Weinstein, Tarantino announced he would be parting ways with his former studio. Every major studio besides Disney was reportedly in the mix to become Tarantino’s new home, with Paramount, Sony, and Warner Bros. emerging as the final three contenders on November 14.

Read More: Quentin Tarantino on His Upcoming Film: ‘It’s not Charles Manson, It’s 1969’

Tarantino’s ninth film is still untitled but it’s set in 1969 and has something to do with the Manson family murders. Deadline reported that the script hews closely to “Pulp Fiction.” One of the stories is expected to focus on Sharon Tate, »


- Zack Sharf

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Don Hertzfeldt on ‘World of Tomorrow Episode Two’ and the Challenges of Expanding Upon the Best Short Film of the Century

29 minutes ago

On his Twitter profile, fiercely independent filmmaker Don Hertzfeldt describes himself as a “director of things / 2x oscar loser.” He’s selling himself short on both counts. For starters, “things” is an endearingly modest way of describing some of the most essential short films of the last 20 years, animated or otherwise; from revered early work like “Rejected,” to the trio of vignettes that were ultimately stitched together into a feature-length omnibus called “It’s Such a Beautiful Day,” Hertzfeldt has created a singular universe of stick figures in crisis.

And then there’s the bit about being a two-time “oscar loser,” a distinction that Hertzfeldt earned when “World of Tomorrow” — his first digital project — was a 2015 Academy Award nominee for Best Animated Short Film. It may not have won its creator the chance to give a speech on global television, but it did win him a legion of new fans. »


- David Ehrlich

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Luca Guadagnino Couldn’t Direct the Year’s Most Talked-About Sex Scene Until He Tried it Himself

44 minutes ago

Call Me By Your Name” doesn’t open in select theaters until November 24, and yet it already features the year’s most talked-about sex scene. Anyone who has read André Aciman’s novel knows the scene in question, in which Elio (Timothée Chalamet) carves out the center of a peach and uses it to help him masturbate. As director Luca Guadagnino tells Vulture, it was one of the scenes from the novel he struggled with most bringing to the big screen.

Read More:‘Call Me by Your Name’ Looks So Incredible You’d Never Guess It Was Shot During a Historic Rainstorm

“I thought it was a scene that can only play in a book, because you could go into your imagination,” Guadagnino said. “I also thought it was a metaphor for sexual impulses and energy. I didn’t believe in the actual physical possibilities of masturbating yourself with a peach. »


- Zack Sharf

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‘The Breadwinner’ Review: Angelina Jolie Helps Deliver the Best Animated Feature of 2017

45 minutes ago

More imaginative than “Coco,” more soulful than “Moana,” more everything than “Despicable Me 3,” Nora Twomey’s “The Breadwinner” cements Ireland’s Cartoon Saloon as an animation powerhouse worth mentioning alongside the likes of Pixar, Laika, and the great Studio Ghibli. A deeply anguished story that’s told with the same vivid style as Cartoon Saloon’s two previous features, “The Secret of Kells” and “Song of the Sea,” “The Breadwinner” triumphs with a sense of emotional sobriety that strikes far deeper than anything that passes for children’s entertainment in this part of the world — it may be aimed at (older) kids, but it’s certain to hit their parents twice as hard.

Executive produced by Angelina Jolie and adapted from Deborah Ellis’ 2000 novel of the same name, “The Breadwinner” is immediately set apart by its setting. The film begins in Taliban-controlled Kabul, where an 11-year-old girl named Parvana »


- David Ehrlich

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Timothée Chalamet and Sam Rockwell Set for Psiff Honors, Lois Smith Gets Lifetime Achievement Award, and More

1 hour ago

As awards season takes over Hollywood, keep up with all the ins, outs, and big accolades with our bi-weekly Awards Roundup column.

-The 29th annual Palm Springs International Film Festival (Psiff) will present Timothée Chalamet with the Rising Star Award – Actor at its annual Film Awards Gala for his performance in “Call Me by Your Name.” The Film Awards Gala, hosted by Mary Hart, will be held Tuesday, January 2 at the Palm Springs Convention Center. The Festival runs January 4 – 15, 2018. Past recipients of the Rising Star Award include Ruth Negga, Alicia Vikander, Jennifer Lawrence, Scarlett Johansson, Anna Kendrick, Dakota Fanning, Terrence Howard, and Adam Beach.

Timothée Chalamet gives a stirring performance as Elio, a 17-year-old on the brink of passion and self-discovery.  It’s an intimate and erotic performance that transports the audience to another time and place and stays with us long after we’ve left the theater,” said Festival »


- Kate Erbland

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‘Easy’ Season 2 Trailer: Joe Swanberg’s Netflix Series Returns With Aubrey Plaza and More Sex

2 hours ago

Season 2 of “Easy,” the Netflix anthology comedy series created by Joe Swanberg, is one step closer, now that the streaming giant has dropped the trailer for the show’s upcoming season.

The show will continue to explore, as it did with Season 1 last year, a set of diverse characters in the Chicago urban space as they blunder “through the modern maze of love, sex, technology, and culture,” according to Netflix.

Related:How ‘Easy’ Creator Joe Swanberg Talked Himself Into Making TV for Netflix

Easy’ will follow the same individually anthologized episode structure, with some new stars joining the show, including Aubrey Plaza, Kate Berlant, Joe Lo Truglio, Michaela Watkins, Judy Greer, and Danielle Macdonald.

Returning cast includes Dave Franco, Elizabeth Reaser, Kate Micucci, Marc Maron, Zazie Beetz, Michael Chernus, Kiersey Clemons, Evan Jonigkeit, Jacqueline Toboni, and Aya Cash. Whether they will play their Season 1 characters is still unknown.

IndieWire’s TV »


- Alberto Achar

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‘Doctor Strange’ Co-Writer: Rotten Tomatoes’ Latest Move Proves Its Bias — Exclusive

2 hours ago

Before I was a filmmaker, I was a film critic. I did that for a solid decade. I mention that an awful lot in interviews and pieces because it’s a part of my life I’m particularly proud of. I love the industry and a lot of the people I came up with who now run it. What I don’t often talk about is that Rotten Tomatoes played a big part in why I left. When that site first started to come together, I saw the writing on the wall and knew that it would change the way traffic to reviews worked forever – and that I might wake up one day to find there wasn’t a job for me anymore. What I didn’t see was how profoundly it would not only reshape the way film critique was digested, but how movies themselves opened.

With Rotten Tomatoes, »


- C. Robert Cargill

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Stephen Colbert Puts Ben Affleck in the Hot Seat, Asks About Groping Accusation — Watch

3 hours ago

Ben Affleck has been making the press rounds promoting his second turn as Bruce Wayne/Batman in the Warner Bros. superhero tentpole “Justice League,” and he was put in the hot seat during his interview on “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert.” Colbert asked the actor about Harvey Weinstein and his own sexual harassment accusation from “Trl” host and “One Tree Hill” actress Hilarie Burton, to which affleck responded, “This is a comedy show, correct?”

Read More:Ben Affleck Jokes About Sexual Harassment in Hollywood During ‘Justice League’ Interview — Watch

Affleck noted that he hadn’t worked with Weinstein in nearly 15 years when the harassment and abuse allegations against the former studio head started being made. The actor reiterated that he was not aware of Weinstein’s alleged abuse and expressed remorse over the fact that he was making movies with Weinstein while women were suffering because of the executive’s behavior. »


- Zack Sharf

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Jeffrey Tambor Accused of Sexual Harassment on ‘Transparent’ Set By Actress Trace Lysette

4 hours ago

Transparent” actress Trace Lysette has accused Jeffrey Tambor of sexual harassment. Lysette is the second woman to go public with allegations against Tambor, following the actor’s former assistant Van Barnes on November 8. Lysette, who has recurred on the series as Shea since Season 1, posted a statement on Twitter in which she revealed Tambor harassed her on set during the making of Season 2 of Amazon’s Emmy-winning comedy.

Read More:Jeffrey Tambor Accused of Sexual Harassment by Former Assistant, Amazon Investigating

According to Lysette, Tambor made “sexual advances and comments” towards her and “one time it got physical.” The actress said Tambor sexualized her in front of co-star Alexandra Billings during a break on set in between takes. Lysette laughed the comments off because “it was so absurd” and she thought “surely it had to be a joke.” But the harassment turned physical later that day.

“In between takes, I »


- Zack Sharf

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Sean Baker Cut Up Paul Thomas Anderson Long Takes To See if a Doc-Style Steadicam Would Work on ‘The Florida Project’

12 hours ago

Sean Baker is a filmmaker who puts a premium on making his films feel as authentic as possible. For example, sometimes he will use a handheld camera to follow his characters — who are often played by first-time performers — to give a scene a sense of documentary realism. After “Tangerine” — Baker’s iPhone-shot indie breakout — he started to wonder if image stabilization advances in smartphone cameras was changing what audiences thought “real” footage looked like.

“Audiences see homemade raw footage, but with a stabilizer on,” said Baker when he was guest on IndieWire’s Filmmaker Toolkit podcast. “So everybody is shooting their Youtube and Instagram videos and they are all very smooth — so we’re changing the way audiences think about how cameras are held and if shots are stable or not.” This led Baker to consider if he could employ a documentary-style steadicam effectively to his next film, “The Florida Project. »


- Chris O'Falt

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‘Better Things’ Review: Pamela Adlon’s Finale is an Endless Gift for Endlessly Giving Mothers

14 hours ago

[Editor’s Note: The following review contains spoilers for the “Better Things” Season 2 finale, Episode 10, “Graduation.”]

Even professional writers have their limit, and mine arrived the moment Max (Mikey Madison) lifted her blindfold and saw her mother, Sam (Pamela Adlon), sisters Frankie (Hannah Alligood) and Duke (Olivia Edward), and grandmother, Phil (Celia Imrie), dressed all in black, standing on a shiny black stage, about to recreate Christine and the Queens’ “Tilted” music video as a graduation present for the family’s eldest daughter.

How do you expand upon something so perfect?

Up until that point, plenty of beautiful moments had stacked up over the course of Adlon’s Season 2 finale, “Graduation.” There was the cohesion between the premiere and the finale. The first episode of Season 2, “September,” finds Sam dealing with Max’s very adult new boyfriend. She’s put in an impossible position: Flip out, demand they break up, and forbid Max from seeing him, or do what she chooses to do: privately fume, keep her daughter close, »


- Ben Travers

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Quentin Tarantino and the Fate of ‘#9’: 6 Questions Studios Should Ask Before Signing Hollywood’s Hottest Free Agent

17 hours ago

What studios are willing to bid to win the newest Tarantino movie is staggering: an upfront agreement to a $100 million production budget, first-dollar returns, and final cut. At a time when even $35 million for an original action film like “Baby Driver” is considered a gamble, this is unprecedented.

The reason is self evident: What Tarantino can do is otherwise missing from American filmmaking. He only directs his own scripts and has never made a sequel, but his films are global events. Tarantino remains one of the only directors whose original films can rake in two-to-one foreign-to-domestic box office returns.

Read More:Quentin Tarantino Receiving Wild Pitches From Studios to Buy New Movie, From Classic Cars to Mock Posters

Still, the studios’ dog-and-pony shows are odd. So many people associated with Harvey Weinstein were victims of his abuse, tainted by their association with the apparent serial rapist, or left in the wreckage at 99 Hudson Street. »


- Chris O'Falt

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2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Editing

17 hours ago

The Editing nominations are often a strong indicator of Best Picture contenders. This year’s Oscar frontrunners include “Dunkirk” and “Darkest Hour,” two sides of the World War II battle between England and Germany, as well as Guillermo del Toro’s sumptuous romantic fantasy “The Shape of Water.” It remains to be seen how the late-year openings, from “The Post” and “Phantom Thread” to “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,”  fare with critics and audiences. 

Frontrunners:

Valerio Bonelli (“Darkest Hour”)

Walter Fasano (“Call Me By Your Name”)

Jon Gregory (“Three Billboards Outside of Ebbing, Missouri”)

Lee Smith (“Dunkirk”)

Sidney Wolinsky (“The Shape of Water”)

Contenders:

Michael Kahn (“The Post”)

Mako Kamitsuna (“Mudbound”)

Paul Machliss (“Baby Driver”)

Gregory Plotkin (“Get Out”)

Dylan Tichenor (“Phantom Thread”)

Long Shots:

Affonso Gonçalves (“Wonderstruck”)

Robert Nassau (“The Big Sick” )

Joe Walker (“Blade Runner 2049”)

Related stories2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Production Design2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Costume DesignOscar »


- Anne Thompson

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2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Production Design

18 hours ago

While “Beauty and the Beast” and “The Shape of Water” are mighty competitors for the Best Production Design Oscar, Dennis Gassner’s mind-blowing collaboration with director Denis Villeneuve and cinematographer Roger Deakins on “Blade Runner 2049” will be the one to beat this year. 

 Frontrunners:

 Sarah Greenwood (“Beauty and the Beast”)

Dennis Gassner (“Blade Runner 2049”)

Sarah Greenwood (“Darkest Hour”)

Nathan Crowley (“Dunkirk”)

Paul D. Austerberry (“The Shape of Water”)

Contenders:

Rick Carter (“The Post”)

Jim Clay (“Murder on the Orient Express”)

Nathan Crowley (“The Greatest Showman”)

Mark Friedberg (“Wonderstruck”)

Rick Heinrichs (“Star Wars: The Last Jedi”)

Long Shots:

David J. Bomba (“Mudbound”)

Stefania Cella (“Downsizing”)

Santo Loquasto (“Wonder Wheel”)

Related stories2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Editing2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Costume DesignOscar 2017: It's Hans Zimmer's 'Dunkirk' vs. 'Blade Runner 2049' for Best Original Score »


- Anne Thompson

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2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Costume Design

18 hours ago

As usual, period dramas are the dominant genre when it comes to Best Costume Design. Jacqueline Durran is competing with herself with the extravagant Disney live-action  blockbuster “Beauty and the Beast” as well as World War II drama “Darkest Hour,” which features elaborate costumes to add weight to Gary Oldman as Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Also needing some padding was Dame Judi Dench as the aging monarch in “Victoria & Abdul.”  Kenneth Branagh’s new take on “Murder on the Orient Express,” featuring himself as mustache-twirling detective Hercule Poirot as well as a slimmer Dench, features a colorful assortment of characters on the mythic train from Istanbul. 

Two rural southern war-time dramas are competing this year: Michael Boyd took on the period costumes for Dee Rees’ “Mudbound,” set during World War II, while Sofia Coppola’s Civil War melodrama “The Beguiled” is another strong entry from Stacey Battat.

Frontrunners

Michael Boyd »


- Anne Thompson

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Oscar 2017: It’s Hans Zimmer’s ‘Dunkirk’ vs. ‘Blade Runner 2049’ for Best Original Score

18 hours ago

For Hans Zimmer, it began with Christopher Nolan’s pocket watch on “Dunkirk” and a creative flourish at the keyboard immediately following his first viewing of Denis Villeneuve’s “Blade Runner 2049.” The result was the creation of two very different but experimental scores in collaboration with Zimmer’s protege, Benjamin Wallfisch (“It,” “Hidden Figures”), which are both Oscar frontrunners. (A third composer, Lorne Balfe, also contributed to the “Dunkirk” score, but only two composers can be submitted to the academy’s music branch for Oscar consideration.)

“I love these days how we are truly breaking down the walls between sound design and music,” Zimmer said. But to help convey “the visceral realism” of “Dunkirk’s” legendary evacuation of more than 300,000 British and Allied troops under German bombardment, the score needed to be in perfect sync with picture and sound. And this was complicated by playing with time and the »


- Bill Desowitz

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Ben Affleck’s Future as Batman: The Mystery of Whether or Not He’ll Leave the Dceu Deepens

19 hours ago

Very minor “Justice League” spoilers below.

Will Ben Affleck continue to play Batman or won’t he? The actor’s future as the Caped Crusader has been a topic of discussion ever since rumors broke in July that he would step down from the role following his appearance in “Justice League.” Affleck has played Bruce Wayne/Batman twice, with his first appearance taking place in the much maligned “Batman v Superman.”

Read More:‘Justice League’ Review: D.C.’s Epic Action Showdown is a Wannabe ‘Avengers’ Movie

The first reports in July said Warner Bros. was figuring out a way to write Affleck’s iteration of the character out. The actor was originally slated to direct the movie, currently titled “The Batman,” but was taken off and replaced by “War of the Planet of the Apes” director Matt Reeves so that Affleck could focus solely on the character. Affleck’s script was also dropped. »


- Zack Sharf

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Marvel vs. DC at the Box Office: One Comes out on Top — but Not by Much

19 hours ago

With DC Entertainment’s “Justice League” opening Friday, we have a rare confluence: two films, each from rival comic-book universes, opening within two weeks of each other. For the first time since “The Green Lantern” debuted two weeks after “X-Men: First Class” in June 2011, two heavyweights will compete directly.

These films’ comic-book sources have fervent and vocal fan bases. Arguing the relative value of each is impossible (and  inadvisable), but it is possible to look over their respective box-office histories and assess their relative popularity.

Since DC Comics presented “Superman” in 1997, there have been a combined 77 theatrical released films from DC and rival Marvel. We’ve taken their grosses (adjusted to 2017 ticket prices) and compared their box-office performance.

Spoiler alert: There’s a lot more Marvel movies than DC movies, and they made a lot more money. Marvel has produced 48 movies, which grossed $11.8 billion in North America. (All numbers adjusted. »


- Tom Brueggemann

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‘Coco’: Why Pixar’s Unifying Día de los Muertos Drama Is Animation Oscar Frontrunner

20 hours ago

At a time when we need bridges instead of walls, Pixar’s “Coco” offers the best possible unification for our country, with its beautiful, musical, and heartfelt ode to Día de los Muertos (Day of the Dead), and will be hard to beat for the Oscar.

But above and beyond its authentic cultural trappings and fresh twist on a “Back to the Future”-like buddy comedy, “Coco” is a wondrous celebration of family and remembrance, featuring an all-Latino cast that includes “Mozart in the Jungle’s” Gael Garcia BernalBenjamin Bratt, Renée Victor, and newcomer Anthony Gonzalez.

Continuing a recent Pixar trend devoted to mid-life crisis stories, “Coco” concerns 12-year-old Miguel (Gonzalez), an aspiring guitarist from a rural Mexican town, whose family of shoemakers has banned music. After borrowing the skeleton guitar of his great-great grandfather and musical icon, Ernesto de la Cruz (Bratt), Miguel gets transported to the Land of the Dead »


- Bill Desowitz

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‘Rampage’ First Trailer: The Rock Goes to War Against Giant Monsters (and It Looks Batsh*t Crazy)

20 hours ago

If you thought Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson and director Brad Peyton unleashed mayhem in “San Andreas,” just wait until you see what they’ve cooked up for “Rampage.” The duo’s new film is based on the 1980’s arcade video game of the same name and puts The Rock in the war path of gigantic monsters. Let’s face it: We’ve always wanted to see The Rock and King Kong try and kill each other.

Read More:Dwayne Johnson Isn’t Your Average Superstar: How The Rock Has Built a Career With Smart Choices

Rampage” stars The Rock opposite Naomie Harris, Malin Åkerman, and Joe Manganiello. The four play a group of scientists, engineers, and soldiers who form a task force to try and take down a hoard of mutated animals, one of which is a gigantic ape that is more or less King Kong.

New Line Cinema will »


- Zack Sharf

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