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‘Game of Thrones’ Spinoff Series Will Be ‘Recognizable as a Past Event’ to Readers, Says Screenwriter

2 hours ago

Not much is known about the different “Game of Thrones” spinoffs in development in HBO, though it has been confirmed that all four are prequels and will feature no existing characters. Courtesy of an IGN interview with Jane Goldman, who’s writing one of the proposed spinoffs, we now know that hers will be “recognizable as a past event” to those familiar with Westeros.

Read More:‘Game of Thrones’ Spin-offs: George R.R. Martin Still Co-Writing Two of Them, But Nothing Will Be Ready for A Long Time

Though she emphasizes that she “can say absolutely nothing” in terms of plot details, the “Kick-Ass” screenwriter responds in the affirmative when asked if her spinoff will feature any magic or supernatural elements. Goldman is developing the show alongside George R. R. Martin, and says that she’s “had the pleasure of going to spend some time with him and working on things »


- Michael Nordine

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‘Mr. Robot’ Season 3 Clip: Has the Dark Army Come for Elliot and Darlene? — Watch

3 hours ago

Mr. Robot” is taking a cue from The Cure this season. Sam Esmail has said that, while the show’s sophomore season was about revolution, the next round of episodes centers around the theme of disintegration. A new clip teasing Season 3 offers a sense of what to expect from that. Watch below.

Read More:‘Mr. Robot’ Trailer: Elliot Is Alive, But Season 3 Might Just Kill Him

“Prepare yourself, friend. This clip is just the beginning,” tweeted the official “Mr. Robot” account by way of announcement. Said preview finds Elliot (Rami Malek) casually brushing off his victory in a hacking tournament as revelers celebrate around him as he returns to work. That’s interrupted when his sister Darlene (Carly Chaikin) comes to him with a man he’s never seen before who tells Elliot, “Stand up and walk with us.”

Read More:Comic-Con 2017 Winners & Losers: ‘Westworld,’ ‘Archer,’ Halle Berry, ‘Mr. Robot’ and »


- Michael Nordine

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‘Death Note’: Adam Wingard Defends Anime Adaptation Against Whitewashing Claims: ‘It Is a Whole New Thing’

4 hours ago

Like a lot of movies made in the last year, “Death Note” has faced criticism for whitewashing its source material. The upcoming Netflix drama is based on a Japanese manga and, not unlike “Ghost in the Shell,” has changed Japanese characters into American ones: Nat Wolff plays Light Turner (the updated version of Light Yagami), while Margaret Qualley is Mia Sutton (Misa Amane).

Director Adam Wingard addressed those claims to Vulture, saying that his take on “Death Note” isn’t “just taking a character and trying to say a white kid is a Japanese kid. It is a whole new thing. The characters are all very different and it is a different kind of experience all together.”

Read More:‘Death Note’: Controversial Netflix Adaptation Gets Mixed Reaction at Comic-Con

Wingard, who also directed “You’re Next” and “Blair Witch,” got defensive about the same subject a couple months back: “Just clearing up misconceptions. »


- Michael Nordine

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After Soderbergh: See the Top 10 Box Office Track Records of Classic Indie Filmmakers

4 hours ago

In a career that began with “sex lies and videotape” in 1989, “Logan Lucky” is Steven Soderbergh’s 26th theatrical release. It will extend his record as the top-grossing American director to come out of the independent scene in its formative years — a period we’ll define as 1975 (Joan Micklin Silver’s “Hester Street”) through 1992 (Quentin Tarantino’s debut, “Reservoir Dogs”).

To be clear, Soderbergh’s an outlier; his billion-dollar box office dwarfs every other indie filmmaker. However, looking at the performance of his contemporaries who got their start in that indie film movement, you may be surprised at who’s on the list. (Note: “Outside wide release” means less than 1,000 screens. Also, the list doesn’t include directors like Sam Raimi and Abel Ferrara, who have independent roots but were not discovered via the film festival/arthouse pathway, or Alan Rudolph, another significant ’80s figure; he started in horror films in the early ’70s. »


- Tom Brueggemann

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Elisabeth Moss Gets Candid About Scientology in Response to a Fan Question on Instagram

5 hours ago

Like a lot of famous Scientologists, Elisabeth Moss isn’t known for speaking about her religion publicly. The “Mad Men,” “Top of the Lake,” and “The Handmaid’s Tale” star made an exception on Instagram (of all places) on Friday in response to a fan’s question about the parallels between Scientology and the oppressive regime in the Hulu series that just earned Moss her latest Emmy nod.

Read More:‘Top of the Lake: China Girl’ Teasers: Elisabeth Moss Goes Down Under for a Murder Mystery — Watch

“Love this adaptation so much,” asked Instagram user moelybanks on one of the actress’ posts. “Question though, does it make you think twice about Scientology? Both Gilead and Scientology both believe that all outside sources (aka news) are wrong or evil… it’s just very interesting.” Moss — who’s said to have walked out of the room when Leah Remini, a former Scientologist, »


- Michael Nordine

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‘It’ Game Allows You to Experience the Terror of Pennywise the Clown in All His 8-Bit Glory

6 hours ago

As you may have noticed, “It” is among the most anticipated films of the year. If you can’t contain your excitement for the new adaptation of Stephen King’s classic horror novel, tide yourself over with a new 8-bit computer game that’s free to play online — unless you’re scared.

Read More:‘It’: Tilda Swinton Was Considered to Play Pennywise the Clown, but the Evil Force That Is Her Schedule Wouldn’t Allow It

The game comes with simple directions: You move the S.S. Georgie left and right using the arrow keys, pop floating red balloons to earn points, and do your utmost to avoid Pennywise the Clown and other obstacles. Those simple tasks are made considerably more difficult by the presence of Pennywise, whose laugh alone is enough to distract you from floating too.

Read More:The ‘It’ Trailer Is Already Making It Harder to Be »


- Michael Nordine

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‘Twin Peaks’ James Marshall Addresses the Biggest Mystery of All: Was James Really Always Cool?

6 hours ago

Twin Peaks” hasn’t exactly abounded in moments of tenderness these last few months, but the end of “Part 2” remains a highlight: “James is cool,” Shelly says of her old classmate James Hurley. “James was always cool.” Whether or not that’s actually true might not rank among the revival’s most hotly debated questions, but it’s one that actor James Marshall was kind enough to address in a recent Vulture interview: “I don’t think of myself that way or the character that way,” he admits.

Read More:‘Twin Peaks’ Meets Late Night TV: Seth Meyers Hosts His Show in the Red Room — Watch

“Shelly isn’t saying James has become ‘Fonzie cool.’ What she’s saying, I think, is that he’s cool because he’s always had a straight line,” Marshall clarifies. “Everyone has gone a little kooky, but James has always been a good guy »


- Michael Nordine

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Roman Polanski’s Rape Trial Will Proceed, Rules Judge: ‘His Conduct Continues to Harm Her’

7 hours ago

Roman Polanski’s relationship with the U.S. court system remains contentious. Judge Scott Gordon opted not to dismiss the director’s decades-old rape case for the second time in four months on Friday, saying that, until Polanski returns to America, there will be no deal. That’s almost certain to be a deal-breaker, as the Oscar-winning filmmaker fled the country in 1978 due to the trial and has yet to come back.

Read More:Third Woman Claims Roman Polanski ‘Sexually Victimized’ Her As a Minor

“The defendant in this matter stands as a fugitive and refuses to comply with court orders,” wrote Gordon, according to Variety. “As eloquently described by Ms. [Samantha] Geimer, his conduct continues to harm her and compounds the trauma of the sexual assault committed against her that gave rise to this case.” Polanski has been living in France, which does not have an extradition agreement with the United States. »


- Michael Nordine

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‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ Season 9 Trailer: Larry David Is the Hero We Need — Watch

7 hours ago

Larry David is the hero we need, but not the one we deserve. Or is it the other way around? That’s one question to ponder as you watch the new trailer for “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” which returns for its long-awaited ninth season after a six-year hiatus.

Read More:hbo Hack: ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’ Episodes Leaked As Hackers Get More Aggressive

“There is only one hero who never stays silent,” intones the narrator as the ad opens, giving a “Batman”-like vibe to the proceedings. “Who fights against injustice wherever he finds it. And the world needs him now more than ever.” Ld’s face then appears in the night sky à la the Bat Signal, much to the chagrin of the man himself: He gives a look of hesitant annoyance before deciding to stay in for the evening rather than come to our rescue. “Turn the light off! I’m not going! »


- Michael Nordine

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How Josh and Benny Safdie Used Guerrilla Filmmaking to Hack Their Way Into Hollywood

10 hours ago

Long before Robert Pattinson took a risk on them by starring in the gritty heist movie “Good Time,” sibling directors Josh and Benny Safdie spent a decade making scrappy, low-budget movies on the streets of New York. Now, they’ve been to Cannes three times, won fans from Hollywood executives and Martin Scorsese alike, and set up their own production company.

Just a few weeks after “Good Time” landed acclaim in competition at Cannes, a big studio project offered them a project. And they said no.

“It’s been a strange confluence of events,” said Benny in an interview a few days before the movie’s release in New York. “It’s just weird, because now there are a lot more people asking us questions—“

Josh, who’s a year and half older at 33, cut in. He does that a lot. “All of a sudden, everyone’s like, ‘Oh, you speak our language. »


- Eric Kohn

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Solar Eclipse on TV: Marge Simpson and Don Draper Show What Not To Do This Monday

10 hours ago

Don’t be like Marge Simpson and Don Draper this Monday.

That’s perhaps the unexpected takeaway from memorable eclipse storylines on both “The Simpsons” and “Mad Men.” Marge and Don both look directly at the sun, with mixed results. And they’re not the only ones with bad eclipse habits.

As the continental United States embraces Eclipse Fever, here are a handful of recent TV series and movies that have incorporated the solar event into storylines and plots. The website Eclipse Guy has put together a thorough database of movies, TV series, music videos and commercials that have included eclipse scenes; IndieWire has curated a list of six recent ones on the small screen.

The Simpsons

The 433rd episode of “The Simpsons,” 2009’s “Gone Maggie Gone,” starts off with a sequence in which Marge, who gives her camera obscura to Homer (who had naturally broken his), decides to peek »


- Michael Schneider

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‘The Defenders’: Why That Ending Represented the Worst Kind of Superhero Cliche

11 hours ago

[Editor’s note: Spoilers follow for “Marvel’s The Defenders.”]

Much of Marvel’s highly anticipated Netflix umbrella series “The Defenders” went so well. The four unique stars gelled together nicely as a team (albeit a non-hugging one), the supporting characters from the four shows united as a complete ensemble in their own right, and Sigourney Weaver wore some fabulous draped blouses and dresses.

Read More:‘Marvel’s The Defenders’ Review: Season 1 Has Major Plot Flaws, But Its Women Make it Soar

Not only that, but the tightness of only eight episodes meant that when watched as a binge, the show managed to avoid dragging the way other Marvel series have done in the past with 13 episodes.

But then, Matt Murdock (Charlie Cox) said the fateful words heard in at least a dozen other stories of this type: “I can reach her.” The “her” in this case being Elektra (Elodie Yung), who has been leading an army of ninjas against him and his friends. »


- Liz Shannon Miller

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How The Clash Became an Integral Part of the ‘Stranger Things’ Musical Emmy Nomination

18 August 2017 4:54 PM, PDT

The use of The Clash’s 1982 hit single, “Should I Stay or Should I Go,” in “Stranger Things” is a great example of why there’s a new Emmy category this season honoring the creativity of the music supervisor. The Duffer Brothers inserted the song into their ’80s sci-fi script to emotionally connect the Indiana family that’s separated by the Upside Down dimension. However, if Emmy-nominated music supervisor Nora Felder hadn’t convinced The Clash of its importance, the Duffers would’ve had to find a replacement.

Fortunately, the “Stranger Things” showrunners (Matt and Ross Duffer) were never aware there was even a problem obtaining the licensing rights. “It was my job to protect them,” said Felder Thursday night during a Q&A panel discussion. “They were worried about trivializing the song and needed to see how it was going to be used in scenes, and for the first »


- Bill Desowitz

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Go See ‘Logan Lucky’ This Weekend If You Want Better TV in the Future

18 August 2017 2:55 PM, PDT

Logan Lucky” and “The Knick” are one and the same. Yes, one is a new Channing Tatum and Daniel Craig-led motion picture — a brisk, lively, crowd-pleasing heist flick, opening this weekend. And “The Knick” was a TV show, set in 1901 with gruesome operations, low ratings, and a cancellation handed down by Cinemax after two seasons.

But beyond their shared director, both “Logan Lucky” and “The Knick” operate outside the norm. If the former succeeds, it could lead to more great TV like the latter; it could help build a world where ambitious shows — like “The Knick” Season 3 — could see the light of day.

Steven Soderbergh’s first and last TV show, along with his return from the filmmakers’ retirement home, are auteur efforts with a clear, creative vision, and their success is measured differently from blockbusters of both mediums.

Read More:How Netflix Has Ignited TV’s Talent War — and »


- Ben Travers

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TV Imports: The Best Foreign Netflix Shows to Binge, Part 3

18 August 2017 1:29 PM, PDT

Even though Netflix has started to cancel its underperforming series in earnest, that doesn’t mean it lacks for programming. In fact, its slate of offerings is fuller than ever, which makes it difficult for viewers to choose when faced with an embarrassment of bingeable riches.

Netflix’s foreign series, however, rarely get promotion amidst all of the other American shows that have been produced. Although IndieWire has previously provided handy lists of foreign-language series a couple of times, including other imports, that is only a hint of all offerings available.

Read More:tv Imports: The Best Foreign Netflix Shows to Binge, Part 1

By now, you’ve already seen Brazil’s excellent dystopian series “3%” or the unforgettable “Chewing Gum” starring Michaela Coel, but what’s next? In an effort to continue helping viewers discover new or lesser-known foreign TV shows, we’ve compiled another list of those series worth bingeing below: »


- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Game of Thrones’ Became TV’s Last Great Event Series By Learning From Sports

18 August 2017 1:07 PM, PDT

These days, two of the only forces keeping live TV viewing alive are “Game of Thrones” and sports. On a week to week basis, there are few topics that are guaranteed to generate a conversation quicker and provide an easier shorthand for making friends or small talk than how the Yankees are hitting or what’s up with the Lannisters.

While incredibly lucrative contracts are being built on the backs of live sporting events, be it the Olympics or regional deals for sports like baseball and basketball, there’s a reason that these kinds of spectacles get eyeballs. Over the past few years, for people who aren’t big sports fans, “Game of Thrones” has become the analog to generate the same kinds of conversations among those don’t necessarily care about whether Paul George and Russell Westbrook are going to have any on-court chemistry next year.

Read More:‘Gay of Thrones »


- Steve Greene

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‘Marvel’s The Defenders’ Review: Season 1 Has Major Plot Flaws, But Its Women Make it Soar

18 August 2017 12:45 PM, PDT

One of the best things to come with the proliferation of superhero storytelling, across both film and television, is the growing complexity around the concept of heroism. And thus one of the best things about “Marvel’s The Defenders” is that it’s actively engaged with this, while still managing to deliver ninja fights, comic book in-jokes, Jessica Jones day-drinking, and more fun.

The Defenders” unites the previous four Marvel/Netflix series — “Daredevil,” “Jessica Jones,” “Luke Cage,” and “Iron Fist” — for an adventure that spans not just New York, but the mystical realms. All four of the heroes from these previously established shows find themselves facing a New York in chaos thanks to the actions of the evil, ninja-esque organization The Hand (led by the mysterious Alexandra, played by legend Sigourney Weaver); after being drawn together by their individual investigations, they’re forced to acknowledge that the battle can only be won together. »


- Liz Shannon Miller

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Don Hertzfeldt Teases ‘World of Tomorrow’ Sequel is Happening

18 August 2017 11:12 AM, PDT

Don Hertzfeldt has teased on Twitter that he’s been putting the finishing touches on a new project, but he dropped a bombshell today by apparently confirming that his new movie is actually a sequel to his Oscar-nominated “World of Tomorrow.” The independent filmmaker posted a photo of a title card that reads: “World of Tomorrow Episode Two: The Burden of Other People’s Thoughts.”

pic.twitter.com/MSd0YIZ5A4

— don hertzfeldt (@donhertzfeldt) August 18, 2017

World of Tomorrow” followed a young stick-figure girl named Emily as she’s taken on a mind-bending tour of her distant future, one that includes making contact with her clone 227 years in the future. The 16-minute short premiered at the Sundance Film Festival where it won the Grand Jury Prize for Short Film. Other accolades include the Annie Award for Best Animated Short of 2015 and an Oscar nomination for Best Animated Short Film.

IndieWire senior »


- Zack Sharf

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Jeremy Renner Will Break His Arms If It Lets Him Make a Movie Like ‘Wind River’ — Career Watch

18 August 2017 10:42 AM, PDT

Welcome to Career Watch, a vocational checkup of top actors and directors, and those who hope to get there. In this edition we take on Jeremy Renner, who stars in Taylor Sheridan’s indie hit western “Wind River” with fellow-Avenger Elizabeth Olsen.

Bottom Line: Renner has built his movie stardom and used it to smart advantage, ranging from archer Hawkeye in “The Avengers” to throwing banter with Simon Pegg in “Mission: Impossible.” Those movies make it possible for him to be a magician in love with a Frenchwoman (Marion Cotillard) in James Gray’s “The Immigrant,” or the pompadoured Camden, New Jersey Mayor Carmen Polito in David O. Russell’s “American Hustle.”

Career Peaks: Renner had been a working actor for 13 years, supporting himself with construction and house-flipping (and roles as serial killer Jeffrey Dahmer and zombie killer in Danny Boyle’s “28 Days Later”) when he broke out at age 37 as the fearless, »


- Anne Thompson

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‘Gook’ Review: Justin Chon Delivers a Powerfully Unsubtle Drama for Painfully Unsubtle Times

18 August 2017 10:15 AM, PDT

Almost certainly the most confrontational film about the Asian-American experience since “Better Luck Tomorrow,” Justin Chon’s “Gook” is about as subtle as a trash can smashing through a pizzeria window, but this isn’t a story for subtle times. Set on April 29, 1992 — the first night of the Los Angeles Riots — it’s not a story about subtle times, either. On the contrary, this messy but lived-in drama is intended for a climate that’s tilted towards hatred and erasure, an environment in which people are forced to scream their voices hoarse just to remind the world of their basic humanity. You don’t call a movie “Gook” because you feel heard.

A frequently angry call to action that’s shot in spare black-and-white (all the better to evoke the scrappy kind of indies that were arriving on the scene back in the “Clerks” era), “Gook” hinges on two normal Korean-American guys. »


- David Ehrlich

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