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What Losing Lincoln Plaza Means to the Future of Subtitled Film

7 hours ago

It’s just one theater, with six screens. But news that the landlord for the Lincoln Plaza Theaters —on Manhattan’s Upper West Side, across the street from Lincoln Center — is not renewing the lease for its present (and only) operators, longtime exhibitors and distributors Dan and Toby Talbot, could be the biggest news in specialized film this year.

Totaling a little over 1,000 seats, Lincoln Plaza has been the most important single theater in the domestic specialized market since its opening in 1981. Though it no longer provides the biggest grosses for most independent and other arthouse releases, it remains the single most vital location for launching subtitled and other high-end titles in the U.S.

Initial reports say the Talbots — dominant forces for over 50 years in the New York specialized film business — were unable to make a deal to continue operation. The landlord, Milstein Properties — has not confirmed that it will continue as a theater. »


- Tom Brueggemann

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David Boreanaz, Primetime’s Most Valuable Player, Has Another Hit With ‘Seal Team’ — Ratings Watch

9 hours ago

David Boreanaz is once again proving his primetime power. Fresh off a 12-season run on the Fox staple “Bones,” Boreanaz didn’t miss a beat: His new CBS drama, “Seal Team,” has already been given a full 22-episode first season order, and is shoo-in for a sophomore renewal.

Not many performers can brag about starring in back-to-back-to-back hits, which makes Boreanaz a TV heavy hitter on par with stars like Ted Danson and William Shatner — the rare actors who have enjoyed multiple hits on unrelated shows. Boreanaz, of course, top-lined the “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” spinoff “Angel” for several years (and 110 episodes) before moving on to 246 episodes of “Bones.”

Seal Team” stars Boreanaz as Jason Hayes, the leader of the Tier One team, a group deployed on clandestine missions worldwide at a moment’s notice. The show has been consistently making the top 25 ratings among both adults 18-49 and total viewers. »


- Michael Schneider

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Morgan Spurlock’s Former Partners Pull ‘Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!’ from Sundance Film Festival

9 hours ago

One day after Morgan Spurlock resigned from the production company he co-founded following his disclosure that a woman “believed she had been raped” by the documentarian, his remaining partners have pulled his upcoming film from the 2018 Sundance Film Festival.

Read More:10 Toronto Film Festival Documentaries That Could Shake Up the Oscars

“Due to Morgan Spurlock stepping down from Warrior Poets, we the partners have decided that this is not the appropriate time for ‘Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!’ to premiere at the Sundance Film Festival,” wrote co-founder/partner Jeremy Chilnick and partner Matthew Galkin in a statement released December 15. “Therefore, we will be removing the documentary from the festival’s slate.”

The film first screened at September’s Toronto International Film Festival, where YouTube Red paid $3.5 million for the distribution rights. It chronicles Spurlock’s decision to open a fast food restaurant in Columbus, Ohio that sold only “hormone-free, »


- Jenna Marotta

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Manhattan’s Beloved Lincoln Plaza Cinema Will Close for Good in January 2018

10 hours ago

Lincoln Plaza Cinema  — the first stop for much acclaimed independent and foreign fare since 1981 — will shutter next month when its New York City lease ends, according to Deadline. Occupying an Upper West Side residential building’s basement, the six-screen theater has hosted exclusive engagements of films like “Fahrenheit 9/11” and “Certified Copy.” It is operated as a partnership between the founder of the former New Yorker Films distribution company, Dan Talbot; France’s Gaumont Film Company, a mini-major studio; and local real estate investment film Milstein Properties, the owner of the site.

Read More:Dan Talbot’s 2004 Gotham Awards Speech

Talbot’s wife of 68 years, Toby, told Deadline that they “did everything we could to ask for the lease to be extended,” to no avail, as Milstein is “looking to make money” and “get everything [they] can.”

Multiple sources told IndieWire that Howard Milstein, chairman of Milstein Properties, had been seeking a buyer »


- Jenna Marotta

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‘Live Pd’: Secrets Behind A&E’s Addictive Cop Show, and How It Almost Goes Off the Rails Each Week

12 hours ago

There’s nothing quite like “Live Pd,” the hit A&E series that follows cops and sheriffs — live, in real time, as they patrol various cities and counties across the country. The series began as an eight-episode experiment, for two hours a week, back in October 2016. But as it turned into a sensation, A&E kept expanding the show’s footprint.

Now, “Live Pd” airs twice a week, on Friday and Saturday nights, for three hours both evenings (from 9 p.m. to midnight). And other than a brief five-week hiatus in September, it’s been on the air for most of the year.

“It is by far the most frustrating, challenging, and gratifying program that I have ever been involved with,” said executive producer Dan Cesareo, whose Big Fish Entertainment is behind the series. “No two nights are the same. You could have a great show one night, where we »


- Michael Schneider

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Netflix’s ‘A Christmas Prince’ Is Just the Start of the Streaming Giant’s Quest for Christmas Dominance

12 hours ago

If you haven’t watched Netflix’s “A Christmas Prince” yet, then you’re missing out. It’s not that the movie is really all that good. It’s Ok, but we’ll get back to that in a second. What matters is that this fairy tale rom-com has helped Netflix begin its mission: to steal Christmas from cable networks.

While networks like Lifetime, Freeform, Up, and Ion have been cranking out some holiday rom-coms and programming, Hallmark is the undisputed leader of Christmas fare. The channel began its new original Christmas movies back in October, ruled over the five-day Thanksgiving weekend, and is still making a splash with yuletide movies like “The Christmas Train” and “Switched for Christmas.”

Read More:Hallmark’s Cheesy Christmas Movies Are Already Dominating Cable This Holiday Season — Ratings Watch

Yet despite Hallmark’s apparent dominance, Netflix’s “A Christmas Prince” is the far buzzier name »


- Hanh Nguyen

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‘The Post’: Director Steven Spielberg Turned His Journalism Thriller into a Film Production Metaphor

12 hours ago

The convergence of the micro and macro worlds of politics and journalism in “The Post” most appealed to two-time Oscar-winning production designer Carter (“Lincoln,” “Avatar”). The entry point of Liz Hannah’s script was Katharine Graham (Meryl Streep) finding her voice at 54 as the new publisher of The Washington Post with the landmark publication of “The Pentagon Papers” in 1971. Director Steven Spielberg added the social context of journalists having a vital voice in search of the truth with the help of Hannah and scribe Josh Singer (“Spotlight”).

“I think that when Liz grasped the idea of Kay’s rite of passage as a road map for the rest of her life beyond raising children that she was onto something that certainly was significant,” said Carter. “So then, for me, there’s the intimate side of Juliet and Romeo being the Kay Graham and Ben Bradlee [Tom Hanks] platonic love story, where their »


- Bill Desowitz

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‘The X-Files’ Season 11 Review: Mulder and Scully Return, and The Results Are Genuinely Exciting

12 hours ago

When “The X-Files” returned to Fox in January 2016 after lying dormant for years, no one was really quite sure what to expect. After all, sometimes when a beloved franchise dusts itself off for a new run of episodes, it works. But sometimes, the end result is best described as, well, dusty — which was the case with Season 10 (or, if you like, a special Fox “event series”), a mixed bag of episodes which reunited stars Gillian Anderson and David Duchovny with creator Chris Carter, but at best was clumsy and at worst a pale echo of the once-great drama.

In reviewing the Season 10 cliffhanger finale, “My Struggle II,” IndieWire noted that if the show had ended there forever, it would have been a real tragedy for the show’s legacy. However, the season overall was enough of a disappointment to leave us nervous about what would happen when Fox (inevitably) greenlit a follow-up season. »


- Liz Shannon Miller

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Martin Scorsese’s ‘The Age of Innocence’ and More Join Criterion Collection in March 2018

13 hours ago

Martin Scorsese is no stranger to The Criterion Collection, but that doesn’t make the announcement that his period drama “The Age of Innocence” will be officially joining the club in March 2018 any less exciting. Scorsese’s 1993 adaptation of Edith Wharton’s seminal novel will join other Scorsese films like “The Last Temptation of Christ” in the Collection.

Read More:‘Silence of the Lambs,’ ‘Night of the Living Dead,’ and More Join Criterion Collection in February 2018

“Innocence” is one of six new movies coming to Criterion in March 2018. Other new additions include Carl Theodor Dreyer’s silent masterpiece “The Passion of Joan of Arc” and Volker Schlöndorff’s largely-unseen “Baal.” You can head over to The Criterion Collection website to pre-order the titles now. Check out all the new additions below. Synopses provided by Criterion.

Elevator to the Gallows

For his feature debut, twenty-four-year-old Louis Malle brought together a mesmerizing performance by Jeanne Moreau, »


- Zack Sharf

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Minnie Driver Has Some Issues With Matt Damon’s Sexual Harassment Opinions: ‘Good God, Seriously?’

13 hours ago

Minnie Driver is criticizing Matt Damon after the actor shared some new controversial opinions on sexual harassment. Damon is making headlines for expressing his belief that a “continuum” exists between different types of sexual misconduct. The actor told Peter Travers of Rolling Stone that it would be unfair to compare accused men like Al Franken to other likes Harvey Weinstein because their harassment allegations “don’t belong in the same category.”

Read More:Matt Damon on Harvey Weinstein and Al Franken: Not All Sexual Misconduct ‘Belongs in the Same Category’

“When you see Al Franken taking a picture putting his hands on that woman’s flak jacket and mugging for the camera, going like that, you know, that is just like a terrible joke, and it’s not funny. It’s wrong, and he shouldn’t have done that,” Damon said. “But when you talk about Harvey and what he’s accused of, »


- Zack Sharf

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Ranking the 20 Best Movie Musicals of All Time, From ‘Singin’ in the Rain’ to ‘Lemonade’

14 hours ago

The musical often feels like a relic of a long-dead Hollywood studio system, but it remains a genre that captures movies’ ability to create story worlds that move freely between reality and fantasy. The worst examples come from filmmakers who give license to music, color, and movement run amok; the best musicals transcend artifice and integrate songs that become expressions of pure character emotion. It offers endless possibilities, but success demands a complete mastery of the medium.

Very few current stars could learn the choreography of Busby Berkeley, Jerome Robbins, or Bob Fosse, and adapting a medium developed and most suited for the stage requires innovative direction. In translating the joy of a live musical to the magic of cinema, some things are easily lost in the shuffle.

Read More:The 10 Best Cinematographers of 2017, Ranked

From “A Star is Born” to “Singin’ in the Rain,” here are 20 musicals that represent the »


- Jude Dry, Chris O'Falt, Anne Thompson, Jamie Righetti, Jenna Marotta and David Ehrlich

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RuPaul is Heading to Sundance for a ‘Drag Race’ Retrospective, Cementing Icon Status Across Industries

14 hours ago

RuPaul is heading to Park City this winter, and it’s not to shoot a special ski bunny episode of “RuPaul’s Drag Race.” It’s an odd couple pairing for the indie film community and the person who brought drag into the mainstream more than once, proving that even the most devout cinephiles love their reality television — as long as it’s paired with a fabulous dash of biting satire. RuPaul has two Emmys for his role hosting “RuPaul’s Drag Race,” which he executive produces with Sundance regulars Fenton Bailey and Randy Barbato of World of Wonder productions.

According to Deadline, RuPaul will host an official “Drag Race” retrospective to celebrate the show’s impact and commemorate its forthcoming tenth season. The event is being billed as, “RuPaul’s Drag Race: A Retrospective of the Cultural Phenomenon.” In addition to the panel, RuPaul will present the Next Innovator Award, »


- Jude Dry

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‘Mudbound’ Director Dee Rees on Mud as an Allegory for Race: Awards Season Spotlight Profile

15 hours ago

Mudbound” stands on its own as an artistic statement, but to hear Dee Rees describe her vision adds another layer to this dense tale. Sundance regulars have had their eye on Rees since 2011’s “Pariah,” an understated coming-of-age tale about a young lesbian growing up in Brooklyn. Rees’ career took a giant leap when “Mudbound” sold to Netflix for a whopping $12.5 million, becoming the biggest acquisition at this year’s Sundance. A sweeping, Southern-set period drama, “Mudbound” lays bare the stark realities of race in America through the lens of two families—one black and one white—and their parallel lives.

Read More:Jason Mitchell on the Extreme Empathy of ‘Mudbound’: Awards Season Spotlight Profile

“I wanted to give weight to what is it to not be able to come home, to be self-reliant,” Rees told IndieWire in an interview for our Spotlight Awards series. “It’s this pioneer story, »


- Jude Dry

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‘The Florida Project’: How Sean Baker and His Collaborators Used Instagram, Target, and Motels to Find its Cast

15 hours ago

Despite casting Willem Dafoe and working with a $2 million budget — the biggest in Sean Baker’s career — the director knew that his sixth feature, “The Florida Project,” couldn’t abandon what’s become his personal trademark: populating his films with untapped talent.

Read More:Willem Dafoe On What He Learned From Working With Non-Actors on ‘The Florida Project’ — Exclusive

“For me, Spike Lee was always one that really did it right,” Baker said. “He would have big A-list stars in his films, and then he would always give fresh faces to some of the bigger supporting characters. He would be introducing so many new faces to the world, new talent to the industry, which is I think really important.”

The Florida Project” has received glowing reviews (IndieWire gave it an A-, and it’s currently rated 95 percent fresh on Rotten Tomatoes) and received multiple awards, including Golden Globes and SAG nominations for Dafoe. »


- Jenna Marotta

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‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’: Stream John Williams’ Score Now — Listen

15 hours ago

Good news for Luke and Leia fans who can’t see “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” until punching out: the space opera’s 20-track score is now streaming online. The latest batch of compositions from five-time Oscar-winner and 50-time nominee John Williams comes with a 70-minute runtime and a track list — “Fun with Finn and Rose,” “The Rebellion Is Reborn,” “A New Alliance” — low on spoilers (but if you want them, here you go).

Read More:‘Star Wars: The Last Jedi’ Review: Here’s the Most Satisfying Star Wars Movie in Decades

Officially racing into theaters just one day after its distributor, Disney, agreed to pay more than $52 billion for 21st Century Fox, the film will likely deliver the biggest weekend opening of 2017, having already claimed $45 million last night in domestic preview sales. It marks writer-director Rian Johnson’s inaugural trip to the galaxy far, far away, but »


- Jenna Marotta

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Harvey Weinstein Denies Telling Peter Jackson Not to Cast Ashley Judd and Mira Sorvino in ‘Lord of the Rings’

16 hours ago

Harvey Weinstein has responded to claims made by Peter Jackson that allege the producer blacklisted actresses Ashley Judd and Mira Sorvino from auditioning for “The Lord of the Rings.” In an official statement released by his publicist, Weinstein said he has “nothing but the utmost respect for Peter Jackson” but that he was never involved in any way with the film’s casting.

Read More:Peter Jackson Reveals Harvey Weinstein Blacklisted Ashely Judd and Mira Sorvino From ‘The Lord of the Rings

Jackson revealed to the New Zealand news publication Stuff that he removed Ashley Judd and Mira Sorvino’s names from “The Lord of the Rings” casting list after a meeting with Weinstein. Jackson was pitching his idea for the J. R. R. Tolkien adaptation to Miramax in 1998 and met with Bob and Harvey Weinstein, who told him both Sorvino and Judd were “a nightmare to work with.”

Sorvino »


- Zack Sharf

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‘Ultimate Beastmaster’ Review: This Insane Obstacle Course Competition is Netflix’s Best Alternative to the Olympics

16 hours ago

One of the thrills of watching sports, either in person or on TV, is recognizing that everyone taking part is capable of things that you fundamentally are not. Sometimes it’s throwing a baseball at speeds that would get you booked for reckless driving. Other times, it’s running so fast that you can pose for a picture while beating all of your peers. In Season 2 of the Netflix series “Ultimate Beastmaster,” one of those feats is leaping between giant treadmills suspended ten feet in the air.In that way, “Ultimate Beastmaster” is crafted as unabashed TV comfort food. Following in the well-established vein of other televised obstacle course spectacles, it’s similar enough to “American Ninja Warrior” (even using the same director, Patrick McManus) that anyone stumbling across it on Netflix would be forgiven if they thought that this might be the same show that’s been a staple »


- Steve Greene

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The 5 Biggest Spoilers in ‘The Last Jedi’ and What they Mean for the Future of ‘Star Wars’

16 hours ago

The wait is over. The wait for not only the first mainline Star Wars movie since “The Force Awakens,” but also the wait for the first great Star Wars movie since “The Empire Strikes Back.” Mileage will vary, and the series’ diehard fans are only just starting to see Rian Johnson’s space opus and process their feelings on the most eventful Episode in a very long time.

Nevertheless, it’s already safe to say that “The Last Jedi” has been very well received by critics who wanted the story to break free from the past and challenge the fundamental nature of the galaxy’s biggest franchise. As IndieWire’s Eric Kohn wrote in his A- review of the film: “‘The Last Jedi’ turns the commercial restrictions of this behemoth into a Trojan horse for rapid-fire filmmaking trickery and narrative finesse. The result is the most satisfying entry in this »


- David Ehrlich

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Tommy Wiseau Wants A Part in ‘Star Wars Episode IX,’ and This Video Proves It Must Happen — Watch

16 hours ago

The Room” mastermind Tommy Wiseau may be too busy to direct a “Star Wars” movie right now, but he’s apparently free enough to be able to play a part in “Star Wars Episode IX.” Taking full advantage of the fact that “The Last Jedi” and “The Disaster Artist’ are both playing in theaters, Wiseau is pitching himself for the next “Star Wars” sequel, which is being directed by J.J. Abrams.

Read More:Tommy Wiseau Wants to Direct a ‘Star Wars’ Movie — but He’s ‘Very Busy,’ So He’d Prefer to Act

Wiseau has taken to Twitter to directly address the official “Star Wars” account and request a part in the third entry in the Rey-centric trilogy. Fortunately, we already know how brilliant a Tommy Wiseau-starring “Star Wars” film would be thanks to a viral video that launched in May earlier this year.

Oh, hi, Mark. Put me in the next Star Wars. »


- Zack Sharf

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The 10 Best Cinematographers of 2017, Ranked

17 hours ago

There were so many incredibly shot films this year that narrowing it down to 10 wasn’t easy. What follows is not an attempt the highlight the best-looking movies of the year, but the ones that used cinematography most effectively in building expressive, cinematic worlds. This list embraces exploration of form, creative use of limitations, and overcoming challenges with craft and innovation. Often, the awards-season narrative for below-the-line talent is scale and the most obvious use of craft; here, the focus is how form can be used to elicit emotion and tell a story. These are 10 films that do that exceeding well.

10. “A Ghost Story

A movie made with a small group of friends, shot in small house over a small number of days, is not supposed to be this visually big. But just like David Lowery’s film itself, cinematographer Andrew Droz Palermo finds incredible depth and beauty in the simplicity of “A Ghost Story. »


- Chris O'Falt

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