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‘The Sinner’: Why This Mystery Is Swapping Out Red Herrings for Something Much More Satisfying

3 hours ago

In the lead-up to “The Sinner,” the creators, actors, and loglines stressed the idea that this was a crime story that concerned itself more about the “why.” But Wednesday night’s episode, down to the horrific discovery that closed out the show’s fourth installment, proved that the show has still been concerned with plenty of those other “w” questions, particularly “what” it is that every character in this USA drama thinks they’re pursuing.

The murder that opened the series has been combed over by all the show’s major players: possibly unwitting perpetrator Cora (Jessica Biel), detective Harry Ambrose (Bill Pullman), and Cora’s husband Mason (Christopher Abbott). Determined to stumble on some sort of meaning to a senseless act of violence, each of them have had to confront times when they were not who they purported to be. Harry is struggling through his infidelities and Mason even »


- Steve Greene

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Brie Larson, Women of Cinefamily Co-Founder, Calls for ‘Further Action’ on Sexual Harassment Charges

7 hours ago

In the wake of sexual harassment allegations against staffers at Los Angeles independent theater Cinefamily, actress Brie Larson has commented on the dramatic events at the institution where she co-founded the Women of Cinefamily collective.

Larson and Tina Poppy co-founded the Women of Cinefamily group in 2014. After Poppy left Cinefamily, Alia Penner took the role of co-founder. A source close to both Larson and Penner said that they were planning to step back from involvement with the organization for the foreseeable future.

“The allegations at Cinefamily are upsetting to me personally, both as an advocate for sexual assault survivors and a member of the community,” Larson said, in a statement posted to her Twitter feed. “Firstly, I would like to thank the brave survivors who spoke up — I believe you. The responsibility of handling allegations of this nature should never fall on the assaulted. Cinefamily prides itself on being a »


- Eric Kohn

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Overspending Is Good: Despite Expensive Risks, Studios Should Keep Opening Their Wallets at Film Festivals

8 hours ago

There’s an energy in the sold out theater before a big premiere at the Sundance Film Festival, as the packed audience of industry leaders and indie film fanatics anticipate the unveiling of what could be the next “Beasts of the Southern Wild” or “Reservoir Dogs.” If the film delivers on only a fraction of the lofty expectations, the excited crowd can help a film soar in ways it wouldn’t if potential buyers were watching it in a quiet screening room.

Read More:How Josh and Benny Safdie Used Guerrilla Filmmaking to Hack Their Way Into Hollywood

It’s in this hyped environment that distributors must make acquisition decisions at lightning speed. Often in matter of hours, distributors need to determine a film’s box office potential, put a price tag on that potential, and present a strategy – one that could include promises of publicity and advertising spending, number of theaters, »


- Chris O'Falt

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’Handmaid’s Tale’ Director Reed Morano Had To Mimic Martin Scorsese on ‘Vinyl,’ and Other TV Challenges

9 hours ago

Reed Morano was an accomplished cinematographer and indie director, but getting the opportunity to come aboard “The Handmaid’s Tale” as an executive producer and director of the first three episodes was both a big break and new experience. With “Meadowland” – Morano’s feature directorial debut – she pushed the boundaries in what is a dark, atmospheric, and personal film. Initially, she wasn’t clear to what degree she could push the boundaries in establishing the visual language of the new Hulu series.

“They obviously had faith in me if they hired me, but they were like, ‘Make sure that it has scope and we know when we’re in a flashback,'” said Morano. “You basically have a lot of people standing over you… I imagine it’s similar to what it would be like to direct a studio feature, with the studio looking over you shoulder all the time saying, »


- Chris O'Falt

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As Joss Whedon and Others Are Confronted By Their Treatment Of Women, Fandom Is Evolving to Listen

9 hours ago

As stories of sexual abuse and assault by well-known men grow more commonplace, a refrain has emerged, one that might sound like a plea: Listen to women. Believe women. Even when they speak out against someone that might be considered a genius or hero, don’t ignore their stories.

This week, “listen to women” became a roar. “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” creator Joss Whedon’s ex-wife Kai Cole wrote frankly from her perspective about Whedon being a “fake feminist” and the years he allegedly spent cheating on her. Tig Notaro, in promoting the new season of her Amazon series “One Mississippi,” spoke out regarding sexual harrassment allegations made against Louis C.K.,who also serves as the show’s executive producer.

And after an anonymous letter went to hundreds of people in the indie film industry, accusing those who run Los Angeles-based nonprofit film society Cinefamily of enabling an atmosphere of »


- Liz Shannon Miller

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Cannes Winner ‘The Square’ Is Sweden’s Oscar Entry

9 hours ago

As expected, Sweden has selected “The Square,” director Ruben Östlund’s Cannes prize-winner, as its official 2018 Oscar entry for Best Foreign Language Film. The outrageous satire of the art world starring Claes Bang, Elisabeth Moss, Dominic West, and Terry Notary will play at both the Toronto and New York film festivals.

Read More:2018 Oscar Predictions: Best Foreign Language Film

Östlund’s follow-up to “Force Majeure” wound up the surprise Palme d’Or winner. “The Square” (Magnolia Pictures) is a brilliantly entertaining takedown of the art world, as world-class Stockholm museum director (Claes Bang) encounters a series of unsettling setbacks to his illustrious career, losing control of his increasingly messy life. In one hilarious subplot, after sex with an American journalist (witty “The Handmaid’s Tale” star Elisabeth Moss), they tussle over his condom. In another memorable sequence, a man with Tourette’s Syndrome interrupts an artist (Dominic West) as he »


- Anne Thompson

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‘England Is Mine’ Review: Maybe the World Didn’t Need a Young Morrissey Biopic

9 hours ago

A handsome little biopic that’s sopping wet with the same clichés that its whiny hero so adamantly disavows, Mark Gill’s “England Is Mine” distills the early days of one Steven Patrick Morrissey into an anonymous coming-of-age story that — if not for its keen sense of place — could really be about any mopey white boy whose talents are dulled by torpor. The film begins in the late ’70s, when young Steven is still living in his family’s splintered Stretford council house and writing flippant concert reviews for some local music rags; it ends a few years later, before he and Johnny Marr have yet to record their first track as The Smiths. This isn’t a portrait of an iconoclastic rock god, but of a brooding artist who thinks he’s far too good for such a boring town, and resents the fact that he should ever have »


- David Ehrlich

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‘Game of Thrones’ Finale Photos Still Show No Signs of Daenerys, but Bran Appears Ready to Finally Speak Up

10 hours ago

In the final episode of “Game of Thrones” this season, history will be made one way or another.

For the first time during her reign, Cersei Lannister (Lena Headey) has deigned to hold court to meet with her biggest rivals: Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke) and Jon Snow (Kit Harington), the leaders whose respective Houses are represented in the episode’s title, “The Dragon and the Wolf.”

Read More:‘Game of Thrones’: In Defense of Believable Timelines and Logic Even on a Fantasy Show With Dragons

While Jon and Dany have seen the White Walkers and their army of the dead up close and personal, they have yet to convince Cersei to put aside her power-hungry ways and call a detente in order to focus their combined forces up North to defeat their common enemy. Because most people in Westeros still believe the White Walkers, whom they’ve dubbed The Others, »


- Hanh Nguyen

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New York Film Festival: Alex Gibney, Vanessa Redgrave, and Abel Ferrara Join Documentary Spotlight Lineup

10 hours ago

The 55th New York Film Festival will debut a starry roster of documentaries featuring giants of the art and literary worlds as well as Alex Gibney’s postponed “No Stone Unturned,” a critical investigation into the 1994 Loughinisland massacre in Ireland, which was pulled from Tribeca in April.

Other new works include films from directors Abel Ferrara, Sara Driver, Nancy Buirski, Mathieu Amalric, and Barbet Schroeder; Vanessa Redgrave’s directorial debut “Sea Sorrow,” which played at Cannes; and films featuring Joan Didion, Arthur Miller, Gay Talese, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Jane Goodall, plus stories about racism, American immigration, and the global refugee crisis.

Three documentaries spotlight acclaimed writers, including the world premiere of Griffin Dunne’s “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold,” returning Nyff filmmaker Rebecca Miller’s tender portrait of her father, “Arthur Miller: Writer,” and the World Premiere of Myles Kane and Josh Koury’s “Voyeur,” tracking journalist »


- Anne Thompson

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Netflix Will Release Nyff Documentaries on Joan Didion and Gay Talese

11 hours ago

Netflix is adding two new documentaries to its crowded 2017 roster: “Joan Didion: The Center Will Not Hold.” and “Voyeur,” both of which will premiere at the 55th New York Film Festival and launch globally on Netflix later this year.

Read More:Documentary, Now: Three Rock Stars Who Run The Fast-Changing Nonfiction World

Author Joan Didion’s nephew, actor-director-producer Griffin Dunne, has been laboring on this portrait of his aunt for years. The film spans more than 50 years of essays, novels, screenplays, and criticism, as Didion chronicled America’s cultural and political tides, from the literati scene of New York in the 1950s and early ’60s to her home state of California, where she wrote “Slouching Toward Bethlehem” and “The White Album” and such film scripts as “The Panic in Needle Park.”

Dunne unearths a trove of archival footage and interviews his aunt at length about the many people she met and »


- Anne Thompson

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‘Veep’ Is the Comedy to Beat, as Julia Louis-Dreyfus Prepares to Make History — Screen Talk Emmy Podcast

11 hours ago

Veep” appears unstoppable.

The HBO comedy broke “Modern Family’s” streak of five consecutive outstanding comedy wins in 2015, and launched a streak of its own. After repeating the win in 2016, “Veep” is the favorite this year to take the category once again.

Read More:Emmys: Even With ‘Atlanta,’ The Comedy Category is Still Frustratingly Resistant to Change

Ditto star Julia Louis-Dreyfus, who is a favorite to win yet again as former President Selina Meyer. If she pulls off her sixth consecutive Emmy, Louis-Dreyfus will beat the record for most Emmys won by a performer in the same role for the same series. She’s also in line this year to tie Cloris Leachman for the most Emmys ever won by a female performer (at eight).

But while “Veep” is rightfully getting all of the attention this year, freshman comedy “Atlanta” could play spoiler. (More likely, star Donald Glover is in »


- Michael Schneider

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‘Carol’ Comes to Netflix: See the Full List of Films to Binge in September 2017

12 hours ago

Netflix may be in massive debt, but that hasn’t changed much for the streaming giant, which announced a robust list of new additions today. Todd Haynes’ “Carol” is heading to Netflix, as well as two other masterpieces from provocative auteurs: Quentin Tarantino’s “Pulp Fiction” and Darren Aronofsky’s “Requiem for a Dream.” As the summer movie season winds down, Netflix has plenty of gems to carry you into fall.

Other titles heading to the streaming service include the entire “Jaws” franchise, Martin Scorsese’s Daniel Day Lewis vehicle “Gangs of New York,” and Noah Baumbach’s “The Squid and the Whale.” Check out the complete list of all the new films joining Netflix in September, 2017 below, including our 7 must-see choices.

Read More:tv Imports: The Best Foreign Netflix Shows to Binge, Part 3 “Amores Perros” (September 1)

September kicks off with “Amores Perros,” the breakout feature from “Birdman” and “The Revenant” director Alejandro González Iñárritu. »


- Jude Dry

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‘Godless’ Photos: Netflix Brings Steven Soderbergh’s Epic Western With a Feminist Twist

12 hours ago

Jeff Daniels and Michelle Dockery star in the series about a town run by women who must defend against a murderous gang headed their way. »


- Hanh Nguyen

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Carrie Coon May Be Midwestern, but ‘Fargo’s’ Gloria Burgle Was One of Her Greatest Challenges Yet

12 hours ago

Fargo” is more than a place; it’s a Midwest state of mind. Mention as much to Carrie Coon, a Midwesterner from the eastern end of the region (Ohio) now living in its heart (Illinois), and she’ll rattle off an impressive list of accurate ideological descriptors.

“The ethos of that place,” she said in a recent interview with IndieWire. “That particular brand of stoicism and emotional restraint; the belief that bad things won’t happen to good people and that you have some control; this idea that we can make meanings in our lives, even though the reality is that we have very little control over anything.”

Read More:The 15 Best TV Performances of 2017 (So Far)

All of these things are built into “Fargo,” but there’s one other characteristic that stands out to Coon above all the rest.

“There’s a kind of Protestant work ethic,” Coon said. “We »


- Ben Travers

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‘Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency’ Season 2 Trailer and Photos Look More Bizarre Than Ever

13 hours ago

Everything is still connected when “Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency” returns, but there just happen to be more things to connect.

The Season 2 trailer, which BBC America released on Wednesday, reveals that Dirk (Samuel Barnett) and his pal Todd (Elijah Wood) will be reunited by the law. Meanwhile, Todd’s sister Amanda (Hannah Marks) appears to have figured out how things are connecting also. And it’s very quick, but we’re happy to see the corgi has returned as well as Bart (Fiona Dourif) looking a little bit sooty and the newly bearded Ken (Mpho Koaho). There’s also a prince with pink hair.

Read More:‘Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency’ Season 2 Sneak Peek Is What Dreams Are Made Of

It’s all very confusing, so here’s the official BBC America description:

Every season is a dizzying, smart, dangerous, unexpected and (for us, not the people »


- Hanh Nguyen

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‘Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency’ Season 2 Photos Reveal an ‘Acceleration of Strangeness’

13 hours ago

The BBC America series returns with new cast members Alan Tudyk, John Hannah, and more on Oct. 14. »


- Hanh Nguyen

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Beyond ‘Moonlight’: Searching for Great Queer Cinema on the 2017 Festival Circuit

13 hours ago

The following essay was produced as part of the 2017 Locarno Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring film critics that took place during the 70th edition of the Locarno Film Festival.

When Barry Jenkins’s “Moonlight” was awarded the Oscar for best picture in early 2017, some critics rushed to see it as a sign that the film community had adapted to the need for more expansive stories about sexual identity. Groundbreaking as it may have been, “Moonlight” was certainly not the first successful feature to address the subject, but its popularity epitomized a positive trend in recent cinema.

It should come as no surprise that an arthouse festival so receptive to the changes in the cinematic universe as Locarno would be responsive to these trends. Indeed, gender identity was at the cornerstone of the Swiss film festival’s 70th edition. Among the panoply of works that addressed the theme, three works »


- Leonardo Goi

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4 American Independent Films That Played Well For European Audiences In 2017

14 hours ago

The following essay was produced as part of the 2017 Locarno Critics Academy, a workshop for aspiring film critics that took place during the 70th edition of the Locarno Film Festival.

The term “independent film” is vaguer than ever, but film festivals are the best place to look for its evolving definition. While American independent film has developed a unique identity thanks to Sundance and other North American showcases, it takes on a very different profile when these films travel abroad.

The Locarno Film Festival has developed something of a reputation for enabling European festival-goers to discover the best of American independent film, its visitors relying on the festival’s programmers to delve through the material sold as independent to find the films that deserve the label. Here’s a look at four highlights from this year’s lineup that were well-received by the festival’s audiences.

Good Time

Though it »


- Matt Turner

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Monsters Haunt a Norwegian Village In Creepy Trailer for Tiff Premiere ‘Valley of Shadows’

14 hours ago

Something very creepy is lurking the woods of the Norwegian countryside in “Valley of Shadows,” the feature debut from director Jonas Matzow Gulbrandsen set to premiere in Tiff’s Discovery section this month. The film unfolds from the perspective of six-year-old Asklak, who lives a lonely life with his single mother. Their quiet existence is complicated by the inexplicable death of sheep at the hands of an unseen presence that haunts the woods at night.

The first trailer for the film leaves the nature of that presence uncertain, although one theory about a werewolf seems to correlate with the evidence at hand.

Gulbrandsen, who also co-wrote the film with Clement Tuffreau, has said that he envisioned the story as “a nightmarish version of the fairy tale ‘Peter and the Wolf.’” In early press notes for the project, he describes the Scandinavian gothic project as “a reflection of a child’s mind and perspective. »


- Eric Kohn

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Tig Notaro Says Louis C.K. Should ‘Handle’ the Sexual Misconduct Rumors Surrounding Him

15 hours ago

The once symbiotic relationship between comedians Tig Notaro and Louis C.K. has soured, as Notaro told The Daily Beast that C.K. has no creative role on her Amazon show, “One Mississippi.” Although C.K. is listed as an executive producer during the opening credits, Notaro said he has “nothing to do with the show… He’s never been involved.”

She repeated similar statements three times throughout the interview. “His name is on it. But we are writing the show, the writers’ room. We’re sitting in editing. We’re acting. We’re on set,” she said. Her insistence might have something to do with the fact that a major plot in season two of “One Mississippi” involves sexual assault in the work place.

Read More:‘One Mississippi’ Teaser: Tig Notaro Is No Longer Gay In Season Two of Amazon’s Dark Comedy

There have been rumors surrounding C.K. »


- Jude Dry

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