Edit
I Married a Witch (1942) Poster

Trivia

Veronica Lake was best known for her iconic hair style of having her right eye covered. Many women copied the style which caused problems since they were working in war plants and their hair kept getting caught in the machinery. Lake was asked to change her style until after the war. When she did she lost her iconic look and her popularity soon faded along with her career.
Many scenes had to be reshot because of the unprofessional behavior of Veronica Lake. Fredric March, her co-star, found her particularly annoying. Other Lake co-stars held her in the same low esteem.
Veronica Lake and Fredric March did not like one another, due in part to some disparaging remarks March made about her. During filming, Lake delighted in playing pranks on March. In one scene in which the two were photographed only from the waist up, Lake stuck her foot in March's groin. In another incident, Lake hid a 40-pound weight under her costume when March had to carry her in his arms. After that incident, March nicknamed the film "I Married a Bitch."
Joel McCrea was initially cast as the lead, but declined the role because he didn't want to work again with Veronica Lake, his co-star in Sullivan's Travels (1941).
Sol Saks, creator of Bewitched (1964), stated in an interview for E! True Hollywood Story: Bewitched (1999) that he drew inspiration both from this film and Bell Book and Candle (1958) in creating the iconic TV series. Columbia Pictures owned the rights to both of those movies. Since it also owned the television studio that was to produce "Bewitched," Saks didn't worry about getting sued.
Dalton Trumbo was a contributing writer, but left because his interpretation of the novel differed from that of producer Preston Sturges'. Sturges also left the production (and declined onscreen credit) because of artistic differences with director René Clair
When the petite Jennifer is standing very close to Wallace, she tells him, "I'm as high as your heart." This line is apparently borrowed from William Shakespeare. In "As You Like It" (Act III, Sc. ii), Jaques asks Orlando about Rosalind, "What stature is she of?", and Orlando replies, "Just as high as my heart."
One of several Paramount Pictures productions purchased by United Artists for theatrical release in 1942-43 during a product surplus of the former company, and a product shortage of the latter.
Not only was the TV show Bewitched (1964) influenced by this film, but Eily Malyon (who played 'Frederic March' (q's mother in the opening witch burning scene) played a character named "Tabitha."
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The car Wallace drives is a 1941 Cadillac Series 67. The original cost of the car was $2,595-$2,890, or the equivalent of $41,823-$46,577 in 2016. That car, in good condition, would sell at auction for $20,000-$30,000 in 2016. Note how very dirty the car is--that was to prevent reflections of studio lights and equipment.
9 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Several cast members listed in studio records did not appear in the movie. These were (with their character names): Reed Hadley (Young Man), Jan Buckingham (Young Woman), Florence Gill (Woman Playing Chess) and Walter Soderling (Man Playing Chess).
9 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The scene where a lightning bolt splits open the tree imprisoning the souls of Veronica Lake's and Cecil Kellaway's characters was later re-used in Cheyenne: Satonka (1962).
8 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This was one of two dozen Walter Wanger films re-released theatrically in the 1940s by Masterpiece Productions, and ultimately sold by them for US television syndication in 1950. It was first telecast in New York City on WCBS Saturday 2 September 1950.
4 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page