5.2/10
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34 user 23 critic

Flight to Mars (1951)

Not Rated | | Sci-Fi | 11 November 1951 (USA)
Five astronauts successfully fly to Mars where they encounter seemingly friendly and advanced inhabitants who harbor covert plans to use their ship to invade Earth.

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
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Lucille Barkley ...
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Tillamar (as Robert H. Barratt)
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Storyline

A newspaper reporter and a bunch of scientists fly a rocket to Mars just to find out that Martians look exactly like us. Mars is running low on one of their natural resources (Corium), and plan to steal the Earth astronauts' rocket and conquer Earth. The Martian underground helps the Earthmen stop the insidious plan. Written by Marty McKee <mmckee@wkio.com>

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Taglines:

The Most Fantastic Expedition Ever Conceived by Man! See more »

Genres:

Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

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Release Date:

11 November 1951 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Vuelo a marte  »

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Color:

(Cinecolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The name of Marguerite Chapman's character is derived from the Queen of Mars from the classic Soviet silent film Aelita (1924). See more »

Quotes

Steve Abbott: [playing solitaire] How many years you've been in love with him?
Carol Stafford: [tearfully] Three.
Steve Abbott: How many tears do you think it'll take to wash out three years.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in World Without End (1956) See more »

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User Reviews

A "lost" gem from the 1950s. Don't pass on this one!
9 November 2001 | by See all my reviews

Four men and a lady blast off for the red planet Mars in this lean-budgeted but likable little yarn. The explorers find a thriving civilization of completely humanoid Matians. The leaders of the Martian government act friendly, but they secretly plot to kill the Earthlings and steal the secret of their rocket propulsion system.

Scientist Arthur Franz (`Invaders from Mars') is the leader of the expedition, Cameron Mitchell is the wisecracking newspaper man, and Virginia Houston is Franz's jilted fiancé'. Mitchell fall in love with Miss Houston, and Franz falls in love with a gorgeous Martian lady in a minidress, played by Marguerite Chapman, the heroine of `Spy Smasher' -- one of the Republic serials which Lucas and Speilberg patterned `Raiders of the Lost Ark' after.

Director Lesley Selander shot the picture in just 11 days, and admirable accomplishment in view of the results. After all, it was made in 1951 (the same year as `The Thing' and `The Day the Earth Stood Still') in glorious Cinecolor, and the set designs are remarkably similar to those used in `This Island Earth'. I read somewhere (`Starlog' magazine, I think') that the sets and special effects were by the same people.

The costumes are excellent, especially those worn by the attractive female stars (extremely short, `futuristic' dresses). Also noteworthy is the fact that we get to see Morris Ankrum in his second sci-fi role (the first was `Rocketship X-M'). He portrays a general, as he did in so many 1950s sci-fi films -- but this time he's a MARTIAN general who urges his people to invade the Earth!

A lovely irony for 1950s sci-fi fans.

The highly appealing rocket in `Flight to Mars' was reused in at least three other 1950s movies -- `Queen of Outer Space', `World Without End', and `It ! The Terror from Outer Space'. And that makes this rocket the most well-traveled interplanetary vehicle in film history, second only to the Millennium Falcon!

If you've got a soft spot for 1950s films, this one will warm the your heart if you can find it. Lemme' know if you do.


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