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Rebel Without a Cause (1955)

PG-13 | | Drama | 29 October 1955 (USA)
A rebellious young man with a troubled past comes to a new town, finding friends and enemies.

Director:

Writers:

(screen play), (adaptation) | 1 more credit »
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3,102 ( 265)

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ON DISC
Nominated for 3 Oscars. Another 2 wins & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Judy's Father
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Judy's Mother
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Steffi Sidney ...
Mil
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Virginia Brissac ...
Beverly Long ...
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Dr. Minton
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Storyline

Jim Stark is the new kid in town. He has been in trouble elsewhere; that's why his family has had to move before. Here he hopes to find the love he doesn't get from his middle-class family. Though he finds some of this in his relation with Judy, and a form of it in both Plato's adulation and Ray's real concern for him, Jim must still prove himself to his peers in switchblade knife fights and "chickie" games in which cars race toward a seaside cliff. Written by Ed Stephan <stephan@cc.wwu.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The bad boy from a good family. See more »

Genres:

Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some violence and thematic elements | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

29 October 1955 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Rebelde sin causa  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,500,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(optical prints)| (RCA Sound Recording) (magnetic prints)| (DVD version)

Color:

(WarnerColor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.55 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The 1949 Mercury coupe James Dean drove in the movie is part of the permanent collection at the National Automobile Museum in Reno, NV. See more »

Goofs

When Plato arrives at the mansion just after Judy and Jim do, after talking briefly, they let him into the house. When he walks into the house and comes up the stairs, a cord is clearly visible dragging on the ground behind him. Probably a cord for the microphone. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
First police officer: Get up, get up. Mixed up in that beating on 12th street, huh?
Second police officer: No. Plain drunkenness.
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Soundtracks

I'll String Along with You
(1934) (uncredited)
Music by Harry Warren
Played on the car radio when Jim pulls up to Judy
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
First American Teenager
28 June 2003 | by See all my reviews

"East of Eden" and "Giant" are both great, don't get me wrong. But this is the James Dean that set the archetype for not only the cool Fifties American teenager but perhaps every teenager since. Dean has his white t-shirt, sleeve rolled up for his smokes. He has his red jacket and blue jeans, he's ready to drag and he's ready to fight. From the first moment we see Dean, drunk on a school night, busted by the cops, he's amazingly both personally secretive and universally accessible at once. He's hurt, lonely and looking for kicks - and no one understands him except, maybe, just maybe, that one person in the audience...

Sure, this movie has it's faults. The parents are cartoonish, some of the kids are hip in only a stilted sense and a lot of the movie is unrealistic. There's something disturbingly hokey and amateurish in this portrayal of a typical American town with it's typical American high school. Yet, Dean, Mineo and Wood put on performances that let the viewer suspend reality all the way through..each of these three put on the performance of their lives!

Sal Mineo plays a mousey misfit named Plato (whose homosexuality is thinly veiled). Natalie Wood plays a young women named Judy, part of the in-crowd, who deep down is at wit's end. Both of these characters are amazingly believable, even fifty years later. Mineo's never been as enigmatic or as compelling as he is here as Plato. Then there's Wood - as cynical and alone in her world as Judy feels, we realize quickly she likes James Dean, she needs James Dean - and Dean can dig her.

In retrospect, it's not surprising that the jacketed juvenile delinquent that Dean plays here would become a role model for both young gay men and young straight men alike. He's comfortable being intimate with Plato, his words, his expressions are all too much, too overly emotional (for a straight man). But, the kids, the town itself, quickly learn Dean's no pushover. He yells, he fights and he's afraid of nothing that other people are afraid of - staring down death is just a way for him to kill time. But, he's afraid, something just isn't right with his life. And most importantly, even if he never really does connect with this "typical town" filled with "typical people", Dean does indeed connect - to anyone whose ever been young - and alone.....


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