The Shiver of the Vampires (1971) - News Poster

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Jean Rollin’s Erotic Horror Films Are Celebrated in Excerpt From ‘Lost Girls’ — Exclusive

  • Indiewire
Jean Rollin’s Erotic Horror Films Are Celebrated in Excerpt From ‘Lost Girls’ — Exclusive
Editor’s note: The following is an exclusive excerpt from “’Castles of Subversion’ Continued: From the Roman Noir and Surrealism to Jean Rollin” by Virginie Sélavy. This essay is featured in “Lost Girls: The Phantasmagorical Cinema of Jean Rollins,” which is available now. To celebrate the book’s release, curator and editor Samm Deighan will be on hand to introduce a special screening of Rollin’s 1971 film “The Shiver of the Vampires” at the Brooklyn Horror Festival on October 14.

Usually deserted or abandoned, often in ruins or in a state of decay, sometimes captured just before demolition, always bearing the melancholy traces of human presence, locations are key to Jean Rollin’s cinema and often were the starting points for his films. Three in particular recur throughout his work: the famous Dieppe beach (specifically Pourville-sur-Mer), the cemetery, and the castle. The latter two are typical Gothic locations and an
See full article at Indiewire »

Sex & Death: The Strange Gothic Poetry of Jean Rollin

The era of cinema referred to as Eurohorror is defined by its eroticism, over-the-top violence, and psychedelic supernatural approaches to storytelling. It’s a rabbit hole of movie culture. There are twisting avenues and bizarre subsections that seem endless, but few filmmakers created a library as compulsively watchable and weirdly hypnotizing as Jean Rollin’s. This man’s filmography is massive, a good amount of them representing his work-for-hire hardcore movies and the cheesier selection of horror films. One gets what one might expect: waif-like young women seducing men, seducing each other, and drinking gallons of bright red blood.

Yet something sets Rollin’s films apart from similar offerings: they’re literate. Rollin draws many of his plots from classic Gothic romances. He must have adapted Carmilla in one form or another a dozen times. Sheridan Le Fanu’s story, about an innocent girl seduced by a lonely but evil companion,
See full article at DailyDead »

The Blacklist Season 4 Episode 12 Review: Natalie Luca

Who is Isabella Stone?

If you stuck around for the promo for The Blacklist Season 4 Episode 13, then you already have a tidbit of an answer and a face behind the name.

But that aside, just who is this character that is attacking Red’s organization? Why is she coming after him? What is the deeper meaning behind it?

It’s the type of name drop that can keep Red sitting down and us viewers eager to find out just what type of character Red is going up against.

Clearly, The Blacklist Season 4 is trying to go somewhere different with respect to Red’s story.

I’m interested to see what his being targeted will mean going forward.

The name drop of Baldur Maggnuson on The Blacklist Season 4 Episode 11 certainly piqued my interests in Red facing off with a new nemesis.

The Blacklist Season 4 Episode 12 revealed he was pretty much a red herring,
See full article at TVfanatic »

Crowdfund This! Rollin-inspired Blood Of The Tribades Lusts For '70s Vampire Kink

Award-winning indie filmmakers Sophia Cacciola and Michael J. Epstein (Magnetic, Ten) have launched their latest Kickstarter to fun their third feature, Blood of the Tribades. Described as a Hammer- and Jean Rollin-inspired, '70s lesbian vampire film, Cacciola and Epstein namecheck the majestic Countess Dracula, Twins of Evil, Vampyros Lesbos, and The Shiver of the Vampires as influences. Not content to simply be a vampire lesbian film, the story also focuses in on a socio-political statement. From the film's description: "A vampire named Bathor turned an entire village to vampires, stuck around long enough to teach them to survive, and then promised to return 2,000 years after conquering the rest of the continent. The only problem with this plan is that the vampires, although immortal, have only a...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Jean Rollin: The Vampire Films

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: Feb. 18, 2014

Price: DVD $59.95, Blu-ray $89.95

Studio: Kino Lorber

Jean Rollin's Requiem for a Vampire

Kino Lorber is bundling four of French filmmaker’s Jean Rollin sexy vampire flicks together in the inevitably entitled box set Jean Rollin: The Vampire Films.

As the constraints of censorship began to see in the late 1960′s and early ’70′s, visionary French filmmaker Rollin created a series of mesmerizing horror-thrillers that injected the Gothic vampire film with a more contemporary strain of eroticism. (He took what Hammer had done in the previous decade and turned it up a kinkily erotic notch.) Fluctuating between visual allure and shocking violence, Rollin’s films have come to be recognized as vital entries in the vampire genre.

The four films—The Rape of the Vampire (1968), The Nude Vampire (1970), The Shiver of the Vampires (1971) and Requiem for a Vampire (1973)—are mastered in HD from the original 35mm negatives.
See full article at Disc Dish »

Nyff 2013 Mubi Coverage Roundup

  • MUBI
The New York Film Festival began last Friday. It has long been the Notebook's hometown festival, but this year an unusual amount of films in the 2013 lineup our team has seen and written on at festivals throughout the year. We'll hopefully bring you some fresh coverage during and after the festival, but for now you'll find an index, below, of our reviews of, dialogues on, and interviews about films included in the 51st Nyff. The list will be updated new coverage as we publish it.

The Posters of the 51st New York Film Festival

by Adrian Curry

Abuse of Weakness (Catherine Breillat)

by Daniel Kasman

Interview with Catherine Breillat

by Darren Hughes

At Berkeley (Frederick Wiseman)

by Daniel Kasman

Interview with Frederick Wiseman

by Daniel Kasman

Bastards (Claire Denis)

by Daniel Kasman

Interview with Claire Denis

by Daniel Kasman

Gloria (Sebastián Lelio)

by Adam Cook

The Immigrant (James Gray)

Dialogue
See full article at MUBI »

Digital Fury: DVD Essentials for April

A Planet Fury-approved selection of notable genre releases for April.

John Dies at the End (2012) Magnolia Home Entertainment Blu-ray and DVD Available Now

Finally, a new Don Coscarelli movie! After years of waiting, the cult auteur comes back with a lively adaptation of David Wong’s popular novel. A drug that induces an out-of-body experience sends its users across time and other dimensions. When some of them come back not quite human, an otherworldly invasion is set into motion. Suddenly, college dropouts John (Rob Mayes) and Dave (Chase Williamson) find themselves in an epic battle to save the world. Coscarelli’s surreal visual flair and black comic bent are in full effect here. Hopefully, its critical success will ensure that the beloved filmmaker won't have to wait another ten years to make a film.

Special Features:

· Feature-length audio commentary by Coscarelli, Williamson, Mayes and producer Brad Baruh

· Seven deleted
See full article at Planet Fury »

Now on Blu-ray: Redemption Films: Good, Bad, & Ugly: The Pete Walker Collection, Oasis Of The Zombies, Zombie Lake

It's been a little over a year since Kino Lorber's partnership with Redemption Films bore fruit to the home video consumer with their releases of five classic Jean Rollin features. The last year has been an amazing ride packed with some incredible titles and neat little discoveries for the discerning Eurosleaze film fan. The latest batch of titles from Redemption prove nothing if not their dedication to preservation of these sometimes awful films, but their treatment of even the most boring of garbage is to be commended, and lord knows there's someone out there chomping at the bit to complete their collection. That someone is me.The Pete Walker CollectionOne of the fantastic things about Redemption Films vast catalog is that they, very much like the BFI's...

[Read the whole post on twitchfilm.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

DVD/Blu-ray news #1: “Stitches,” “Citadel,” found-footage “Frankenstein,” etc.

  • Fangoria
Fango got the word that Dark Sky Films will release Conor McMahon’s killer-clown flick Stitches (pictured) on DVD ($24.98) and Blu-ray ($29.98) February 19; special features, if any, are to be announced. Art has appeared for New Video’s DVD ($26.95) and Blu-ray ($29.95) editions of Ciarán Foy’s Citadel, out January 29 with no bonus features announced, and the company also has Michael Axelgaard’s rural chiller Hollow hitting February 19 and the Vicious Brothers and director John Poliquin’s found-footage sequel Grave Encounters 2 set for March 12 on DVD ($26.95 each) and Blu-ray/DVD combo ($29.95 each) with a behind-the-scenes featurette on the former and a Vicious Brothers interview on the latter.

Speaking of found footage, that approach is applied to Mary Shelley’s creation in The Frankenstein Theory, in which a documentary film crew accompanies a professor—who believes the classic novel was based on fact—to the Arctic Circle. Directed by Andrew Weiner, the
See full article at Fangoria »

DVD/Blu-ray news #1: “Stitches,” “Citadel,” found-footage “Frankenstein,” etc.

  • Fangoria
Fango got the word that Dark Sky Films will release Conor McMahon’s killer-clown flick Stitches (pictured) on DVD ($24.98) and Blu-ray ($29.98) February 19; special features, if any, are to be announced. Art has appeared for New Video’s DVD ($26.95) and Blu-ray ($29.95) editions of Ciarán Foy’s Citadel, out January 29 with no bonus features announced, and the company also has Michael Axelgaard’s rural chiller Hollow hitting February 19 and the Vicious Brothers and director John Poliquin’s found-footage sequel Grave Encounters 2 set for March 12 on DVD ($26.95 each) and Blu-ray/DVD combo ($29.95 each) with a behind-the-scenes featurette on the former and a Vicious Brothers interview on the latter.

Speaking of found footage, that approach is applied to Mary Shelley’s creation in The Frankenstein Theory, in which a documentary film crew accompanies a professor—who believes the classic novel was based on fact—to the Arctic Circle. Directed by Andrew Weiner, the
See full article at Fangoria »

DVD/Blu-ray news #1: “Stitches,” “Citadel,” found-footage “Frankenstein,” etc.

  • Fangoria
Fango got the word that Dark Sky Films will release Conor McMahon’s killer-clown flick Stitches (pictured) on DVD ($24.98) and Blu-ray ($29.98) February 19; special features, if any, are to be announced. Art has appeared for New Video’s DVD ($26.95) and Blu-ray ($29.95) editions of Ciarán Foy’s Citadel, out January 29 with no bonus features announced, and the company also has Michael Axelgaard’s rural chiller Hollow hitting February 19 and the Vicious Brothers and director John Poliquin’s found-footage sequel Grave Encounters 2 set for March 12 on DVD ($26.95 each) and Blu-ray/DVD combo ($29.95 each) with a behind-the-scenes featurette on the former and a Vicious Brothers interview on the latter.

Speaking of found footage, that approach is applied to Mary Shelley’s creation in The Frankenstein Theory, in which a documentary film crew accompanies a professor—who believes the classic novel was based on fact—to the Arctic Circle. Directed by Andrew Weiner, the
See full article at Fangoria »

Night of the Demons 2, Zombie Lake, and Oasis of the Zombies Stalking Blu-ray this February

Fans of early 1990’s direct-to-video sequels and early 1980’s European Nazi zombie flicks have reason to celebrate this February as Night of the Demons 2, Jean Rollin’s Zombie Lake, and Jesus Franco’s Oasis of the Zombies make their debut on Blu-ray.

First up on February 19th, Olive Films is set to give the Blu-ray treatment to Night of the Demons 2, director Brian Trenchard-Smith’s well-regarded 1994 direct-to-video sequel starring Christi Harris, Amerlia Kinkade, Robert Jayne, Zoe Trilling, and a pre-Mrs. Ben Stiller Christine Taylor.

In this diabolical sequel to the popular shocker, the students from St. Rita's Academy throw a party at a haunted house, only to have it disrupted by Angela, the hostess from Hell, and her ghoulish pals. The kids try to find refuge at a teen dance, but things get even scarier there! Bobby Jacoby and Amelia Kinkade star in this special effects-filled terrorthon...

No disc specs as of yet.
See full article at Dread Central »

Jean Rollin on Blu-ray: Two Orphan Vampires Review

Up to this point, Redemption's Blu-ray releases of the work of Jean Rollin has focused on his classical period, that is, the films from his debut in 1968 with The Rape of the Vampire through the early '80s with films like The Living Dead Girl. The latter film pretty much serves as the line of demarcation between those films made from passion in his hungry years and the films he made in the '80s to pay the bills. Between 1983's Sadomania and 1994's Le parfum de Mathilde, Rollin mostly served as a hired gun making sex films; some classy and some not so classy. It wasn't until 1997 that he was able to make something that resembled the films for which he's known best;  that...
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Mario Bava on Blu-ray: Hatchet For The Honeymoon Review

Back in 2010, we were extremely excited to review the very first Mario Bava film to hit Blu-ray with Arrow Video's release of Bay of Blood. At the time cult video geeks were hoping that this release would open the flood gates for Bava in HD, if ever there was a filmmaker whose work was made for Blu-ray it is this one. However months passed and there were no more releases in sight until Eurohorror collection Redemption Films teamed up with Arthouse champions Kino Lorber, and those floodgates began to leak like a sieve. Redemption introduced themselves to the world of high definition with a massive pile of Jean Rollin Blu-rays, an impressively curated collection which has still not exhausted itself. Then they released the...
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Mario Bava’s Black Sunday And More Coming To Blu-ray From Kino/Redemption Sept 18th!

The beginning of this year home video label Kino partnered with Redemption Films and has since been reissuing remastered Blu-ray & DVDs of some of the finest and trashiest Euro films to ever grace the screen and now, in some cases for the first time in America! Chock full of Bonus Features, Kino/Redemption has been pumping these releases out non-stop every month with much focus going towards lavish releases dedicated to the films of Jean Rollin (The Nude Vampire, Fascination, etc). To be blunt, these are most-own discs fellow cult enthusiasts and you shouldn’t hesitate to add these to your collection.

Kino/Redemption recently just made a major announcement concerning a library acquisition of a certain Italian filmmaking legend; Mario Bava! Come September 18th, horror classics like Black Sunday, Hatchet For The Honeymoon and a double feature containing The House Of Exorcism/Lisa And The Devil will be making
See full article at Icons of Fright »

The Forgotten: Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

When Bernard Natan, head of Pathé, had his French nationality taken away during the French Occupation (after which he perished in Auschwitz), his brother Emile, also a film producer, was similarly denaturalized. But Emile escaped the country, enlisted abroad, and was able to return to France as a conquering hero at the end of the war. His citizenship was restored and he resumed his producing career, notably with Yves Allegret's Maneges (1950).

When Natan died, his company was taken over by his daughter Monique. Now it was the Sixties, and a whole new generation of filmmakers were at work, with a whole new style. But Monique rejected all offers from the nouvelle vague—the only two filmmakers she took a real interest in were Jean Rollin, with whom she produced and co-wrote Le frisson des Vampires (softcore erotic vampire S&M horror), and Alain Jessua.

Jeu de massacre (1967), Jessua's film for Natan's Les Films Modernes,
See full article at MUBI »

Daily Briefing. Rollin, Hardy, Landis, Dante

  • MUBI
Jean Rollin "was a double outsider," argues Dave Kehr in the New York Times, "a filmmaker drawn to the fantastique in a country that had a limited tradition of genre filmmaking as well as a proud tradition of Cartesian rationalism that discouraged explorations of the supernatural. What France did offer, however, was a thriving interest in eroticism, and when Rollin was finally able to make his first feature, The Rape of the Vampire (1968), he did so by combining his childhood fascination with American cliffhanger serials and early-20th-century French fantasists like Gaston Leroux (author of The Phantom of the Opera) with gauzy nudes and exotic couplings." The British company Redemption is "collaborating with Kino International to release handsomely remastered Blu-rays, taken from the original camera negatives, of five key Rollin titles: The Nude Vampire (1970), The Shiver of the Vampires (1971), The Iron Rose (1973), Lips of Blood (1975) and Fascination (1979)."

"Entering Rollin's cinematic

Jean Rollin On Blu-ray: The Shiver Of The Vampires Review

Our look into the films of Jean Rollin on Blu-ray continues with his third feature, The Shiver of the Vampires (Le frisson des vampires). Shiver finds Rollin exploring the possibilities of the vampire myth in a completely different, yet somehow more conventional way than his previous two films. The piercing black humor in this film makes it one of my favorites, and it really benefits from the HD upgrade. Kino's Blu-ray of this film is beautiful, though not without its fair share of print damage, and definitely worth the upgrade.When a honeymooning couple visit the crumbling estate of the bride's ancestors, they discover her closet is filled with more than skeletons: a sinister lesbian vampire, a pair of nubile handmaidens, and two vampire hunters who...
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Scary Monsters 2011, Round 3

  • MUBI
Following rounds 1 and 2, this one will take us right on through the countdown to Halloween and will surely be the most actively updated of the bunch. Best to begin, then, by grounding it in a classic, so we turn to David Kalat: "Frankenstein isn't a science fiction story about an arrogant scientist who intrudes on God's domain, it's a metaphor about our relationship to God." That's his argument, and I'll let him explain, but I want to pull back to a couple of earlier sentences in his piece. Mary Shelley's novel, "and the 1910 film version, treated the 'science' of Frankenstein as just so much folderol, a MacGuffin to introduce the artificial man into the story. Whale was so good at providing a reasonably convincing visualization of reviving the dead — no, more than that, a stunningly satisfying visualization of reviving the dead — it focused popular attention on that part of
See full article at MUBI »

Kino Lorber and Redemption Films Celebrate Their New Partnership

Kino Lorber and Redemption Films Celebrate Their New Partnership
Kino Lorber and Redemption Films celebrated their new partnership at the Gershwin Hotel in New York last night with a screening of Jean Rollin's 1970 "The Shiver of the Vampires," one of several vintage horror titles from Redemption's library. The deal between the companies positions Kino Lorber as the exclusive distributor for Redemption Films in U.S. and Canada. Kino Lorber plans on releasing 35 films from the library on DVD, ...
See full article at Indiewire »
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