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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2003

9 items from 2017


Harry Dean Stanton: An Enigmatic Icon Whose Final Starring Role Might Be His Best

16 September 2017 4:41 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

As Ry Cooder’s slide guitar sounds melancholy echoes, the man suddenly appears in the desert, walking purposely toward some vague destination off in the distance. His sunbaked face covered with several days of beard, his pinstripe suit dusty and ill-matched with a red baseball cap, he is plainly driven by some inner demons. Just as plainly, he isn’t going to last much longer.

That’s how Harry Dean Stanton first appears in “Paris, Texas,” the classic 1984 drama directed by Wim Wenders from a screenplay credited to Sam Shepard and L.M. Kit Carson. And while taking stock of the much-respected actor on the occasion of his passing — Stanton died Friday in Los Angeles at the age of 91 — I cannot help viewing that unforgettable image as metaphoric: After a long trudge through a wilderness of secondary roles, he finally broke through in this film to get the attention he so richly deserved.

Of course, »

- Joe Leydon

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Film News: Character Actor Harry Dean Stanton Dies at 91

16 September 2017 6:21 AM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Los Angeles – He was often categorized as the ultimate male character actor, but Harry Dean Stanton stood out on his own, with a persona that added immediate recognition in any supporting performance, and was unforgettable when he stepped into a lead role. Stanton died on September 15, 2017, at age 91.

With his hang dog demeanor and distinctive voice, Stanton made his mark over a 60 year career, and appeared in character roles in notable films such as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967), “Kelly’s Heroes” (1970), “The Godfather Part II” (1974), “Escape From New York” (1981), “Pretty in Pink” (1986) and “Last Temptation of Christ” (1988). He had bigger and more up front roles in “Repo Man” (1984), “Paris, Texas” (1984), “Wild at Heart” (1990), “The Straight Story” (1999), “The Green Mile” (1999) and the upcoming “Lucky” (2017).

Harry Dean Stanton in a Recent Photo

Photo credit: File Photo

Harry Dean Stanton was born in Kentucky, and was a World War II veteran in the Navy, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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Harry Dean Stanton dies, aged 91

15 September 2017 5:14 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Tony Sokol Sep 18, 2017

Harry Dean Stanton has died at the age of 91, it was confirmed over the weekend.

Actor Harry Dean Stanton died of natural causes in Los Angeles on Friday September 15th, his agent John Kelly announced. He was 91.

Stanton, who made his breakthrough in Wim Wenders’ Paris, Texas, submerged himself in over 250 movies since he began acting in the 1950s. That didn’t make him any less unforgettable, putting his subtle stamp on such films as Cool Hand Luke (1967), Two-Lane Blacktop (1971), Godfather II (1974), Ridley Scott’s Alien (1979) and John Carpenter’s Escape From New York (1981). Plus he taught Emilio Estevez how to boost cars in the cult classic Repo Man.

Stanton hit the mainstream in John HughesPretty In Pink (1986), he played Molly Ringwald’s unemployed father.

He played against Jack Nicholson, a lifelong friend, in The Missouri Breaks and Bob Rafelson’s Man Trouble.  He also appeared in The Mighty, »

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Harry Dean Stanton, 'Repo Man' and 'Twin Peaks' Actor, Dead at 91

15 September 2017 4:09 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

Harry Dean Stanton, the legendary character actor and offbeat leading man who starred in Repo Man, Paris, Texas, Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me and Big Love in a career that spanned over seven decades, has died at the age of 91.

Stanton died of natural causes in Los Angeles, Variety reports, with TMZ adding that the actor died peacefully Friday afternoon at the city's Cedars-Sinai Hospital.

Director David Lynch, who cast Stanton in Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me, Wild at Heart, The Straight Story and the recent Twin Peaks: The Return, »

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Harry Dean Stanton Dies at 91

15 September 2017 3:35 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Harry Dean Stanton has died at 91, reports TMZ. The actor, a screen legend who endeared himself to moviegoers for his performances in everything from “Pretty in Pink” and “The Godfather Part II” to “Alien” and “Repo Man,” passed away peacefully at Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles.

Read More:‘Lucky’ Review: 90-Year-Old Harry Dean Stanton Gives a Performance for the Ages in Wry Comedy Co-Starring David Lynch — SXSW 2017

Best known as a character actor, Stanton had his share of leading roles as well. None was more moving than Wim Wenders’ “Paris, Texas,” in which he plays a grief-stricken drifter who attempts to reconnect with his former life. Stanton frequently collaborated with David Lynch, appearing in “Wild at Heart,” “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me,” “The Straight Story,” “Inland Empire,” and the just-concluded “Twin Peaks” revival.

Read More:‘Lucky’ Trailer: Harry Dean Stanton and David Lynch Reunite For This Wise Meditation on »

- Michael Nordine

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Opening Wednesday At A Theater Or Drive-in Near You: The Shadow Cinema Of The American ‘70S

6 August 2017 11:28 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

“All the films in this book share an air of disreputability… I have tried to avoid using the word art about the movies in this book, not just because I didn’t want to inflate my claims for them, but because the word is used far too often to shut down discussion rather than open it up. If something has been acclaimed as art, it’s not just beyond criticism but often seen as above the mere mortals for whom its presumably been made. It’s a sealed artifact that offers no way in. It is as much a lie to claim we can be moved only by what has been given the imprimatur of art as it would be to deny that there are, in these scruffy movies, the very things we expect from art: avenues into human emotion and psychology, or into the character and texture of the time the films were made, »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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Recommended New Books on Filmmaking: ‘Wonder Woman,’ 1970s Cinema, ‘Alien: Covenant,’ and More

10 July 2017 6:08 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

We are knee-deep into a summer of dreary sequels, kids’ fare, and a few whip-smart outliers. If you’ve already seen the likes of The Beguiled and Baby Driver, perhaps staying home with a book is a better idea than trekking to the cinema. Let’s dive into some worthy film-centric reads.

Wonder Woman: The Art and Making of the Film by Sharon Gosling (Titan Books)

Patty JenkinsWonder Woman is one of the biggest superhero success stories, and it deserves that designation. The classification makes reading a book like Wonder Woman: The Art and Making of the Film feel like a celebratory affair. After a brief account of the character’s comics history, we delve into designs for Themyscira, concept art of Dr. Maru’s laboratory, and somber depictions of battle. What stands out, however, are drawings and photographs showing the film’s winning costume designs. It is illuminating, »

- Christopher Schobert

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Wild, Dangerous, Imperfect, Wounded Grandeur: 18 Double Features About America

2 July 2017 9:02 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

The United States is “my country, right or wrong,” of course, and I consider myself a patriotic person, but I’ve never felt that patriotism meant blind fealty to the idea of America’s rightful dominance over global politics or culture, and certainly not to its alleged preferred status on God’s short list of favored nations, or that allegiance to said country was a license to justify or rationalize every instance of misguided, foolish, narrow-minded domestic or foreign policy.

In 2012, when this piece was first posted, it seemed like a good moment to throw the country’s history and contradictions into some sort of quick relief, and the most expedient way of doing that for me was to look at the way the United States (and the philosophies at its core) were reflected in the movies, and not just the ones which approached the country head-on as a subject. »

- Dennis Cozzalio

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How Today’s ‘Nonsensical’ Blockbuster Filmmaking Can Learn a Lesson From American Movies of the ’70s

7 June 2017 8:25 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Film critic Charles Taylor’s first collection of essays, “Opening Wednesday at a Theater or Drive-in Near You: The Shadow Cinema of the American ’70s,” explores the rich history of ’70s-era American filmmaking through a unique lens, opting to highlight some of the period’s underseen and often underappreciated gems. As one of the most fruitful times in American filmmaking, Taylor understands why certain features — including offerings from such respected filmmakers as Jonathan Demme, Walter Hill, and Irvin Kershner — didn’t quite make it big at a crowded box office, but he’s also eager to give them their due.

Told with an eye towards the current state of cinema — a blockbuster-driven machine that Taylor calls “nonsensical” and contributing to “the destruction of the idea of content” — the book is a loving look at some forgotten gems and the power of moviemaking that can often be ignored. In our excerpt from the book, »

- Indiewire Staff

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2003

9 items from 2017


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