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Cabaret (1972)

A female girlie club entertainer in Weimar Republic era Berlin romances two men while the Nazi Party rises to power around them.

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Writers:

(based on the musical play "Cabaret" book by), (based on the play by) | 2 more credits »
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ON DISC
Won 8 Oscars. Another 27 wins & 15 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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The Master Of Ceremonies / Master of Ceremonies
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Elisabeth Neumann-Viertel ...
Helen Vita ...
Fraulein Kost
Sigrid von Richthofen ...
Fraulein Mayr (as Sigrid Von Richthofen)
Gerd Vespermann ...
Bobby
Ralf Wolter ...
Herr Ludwig
Georg Hartmann ...
Willi
Ricky Renée ...
Elke (as Ricky Renee)
Estrongo Nachama ...
Cantor
Kathryn Doby ...
Kit-Kat Dancer
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Storyline

Cambridge University student Brian Roberts arrives in Berlin in 1931 to complete his German studies. Without much money, he plans on making a living teaching English while living in an inexpensive rooming house, where he befriends another of the tenants, American Sally Bowles. She is outwardly a flamboyant, perpetually happy person who works as a singer at the decadent Kit Kat Klub, a cabaret styled venue. Sally's outward façade is matched by that of the Klub, overseen by the omnipresent Master of Ceremonies. Sally draws Brian into her world, and initially wants him to be one of her many lovers, until she learns that he is a homosexual, albeit a celibate one. Among their other friends are his students, the poor Fritz Wendel, who wants to be a gigolo to live a comfortable life, and the straight-laced and beautiful Natalia Landauer, a Jewish heiress. Fritz initially sees Natalia as his money ticket, but eventually falls for her. However Natalia is suspect of his motives and cannot ... Written by Huggo

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Life is a Cabaret See more »

Genres:

Drama | Musical

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

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Release Date:

13 February 1972 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Kabaret  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$42,765,000 (USA)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In a 1972 interview with Dick Cavett, Liza Minnelli said that she learned Sally Bowles was a real person, so she put personal ads in newspapers in a futile attempt to meet her. Presumably Minnelli was unaware at the time that Sally Bowles wasn't her real name (the character was based on Jean Ross). See more »

Goofs

The subtitles are inconsistent with how they show German speech/singing. During the opening, with the Master of Ceremonies (MC) singing in different languages, the subtitles show the German words in German. In at least one other part of the movie (when he's singing/dancing with the ape), some German words are translated into English in the subtitles. In this same ape scene, it may seem to non-German speakers or to viewers with no knowledge of what spoken German actually sounds like, that the MC is inconsistent with his pronunciation of English words that start with 'W'. Sometimes he pronounces them as if they start with a 'W', sometimes with a 'V' (for example, the German "Willkommen" (English "welcome") may appear to an English speaker as if it should be pronounced with a "w" sound, but a native German speaker will, in fact, pronounce it as if it started with an English "v" sound (villkommen). See more »

Quotes

Sally: Mayr tells Kost's fortune every morning, and it's always the same: "You will meet a strange man." Which under the circumstances is a pretty safe bet.
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: Berlin 1931 See more »

Connections

Referenced in Dancing with the Stars: Episode #6.6 (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

If You Could See Her
Written by John Kander and Fred Ebb
Sung by Joel Grey
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Divine Decadence
21 February 2009 | by (Virginia, USA) – See all my reviews

I just finished re-watching Cabaret and it is even better than I remembered it. It is a dazzling ball at the Satan, the Feast during the time of plague. It is an unforgettable film, made by the master, the screen version of his own stage masterwork. It is dark, prophetic capture of "divine decadence" that paved the road to the most horrifying hell of unspeakable catastrophe that the world had not seen before. Bob Fosse proved in his only second directed film how talented he was in everything he was doing. Shot entirely on the location in Berlin with the Kit Kat Club cabaret of the title as a real centerpiece of the movie, "Cabaret" is a marvel of directing, editing, color settings, that in combination with brilliantly clever and catchy songs, creates the doomed ambiguous atmosphere of uncertainty, hanging onto the present moment, and not daring to imagine to whom tomorrow belongs and what tomorrow will bring. It is impossible to talk about Cabaret and not to mention the international cast of the young talented actors who played the characters of their own nationality. Two definite stars of the film are without doubt Liza Minnelli as Sally Bowles and Joel Grey as creepy devilish MC. For me, the film belongs to Liza Minnelli who gave performance of such energy, charisma, and exuberance, that it has become Liza's calling card and, her claim to cinematic immortality. Under her rather intimidating makeup - her eyes that took up the good half of her face, the eyelashes so long that they can reach the opposite wall of the room, the impossible garish colors of her eyelids that probably glow in darkness unmistakably announcing her presence and colored in dark green finger nails that can be considered the dangerous weapon, Sally is vulgar but vulnerable, corrupted but lovable, oblivious but lonely, talented but stuck in the cabaret Kit Kat Club where the music never stops and life is always beautiful ...

In 1973, Cabaret competed for the Best Picture of the Year award with number one of 250 Best Movies as per IMDb users, Francis Coppola's Godfather. Not only it was the equal contender, it won 8 of ten Oscars it was nominated for, including Best Director for Bob Fosse, Best Actress for Liza Minnelli, Best Supporting Actor for Joel Grey (who was against three heavy weights from Godfather - Al Pacino, James Caan and Robert Duvall), and Best Art Direction-Set Decoration and Cinematography. With all my love for Godfather, I believe Cabaret deserved all its awards, and as time goes it proves to be one of the best screen musicals ever made.


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