Childish Things (1969) Poster

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10/10
One of the finer films I have ever seen.
victormin28 March 2007
'Childish Things' is one of the tightest written, best presented movies I have ever seen come out of Hollywood. In this listing, the film is shown as released in 1969, but I saw it in 1967 as 'Tale of the Cock' when I was stationed with the Army at Fort Myer, VA. The latter title, I believe, is more representative of the story, and the double (triple?) entendre of the title lends to the wonderfully complex nature of the "Tale" as the symbolic plot of the story unfolds. I imagine that courageous efforts went forth in the production of this movie as some viewers might take offense at any message (Biblical) while others may scoff at its simplicity, but the "Tale" runs deeper than would be seen at the surface. The writer and directors are to be lauded for their reserve, the filming and editing are superb, and the performances of the entire cast are at the top of the actors' craft. Outstanding job, Don Murray! And John Derek gently coaxed a fine performance from Linda Evans. I may be the only person who ever saw this film.
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10/10
one of my favorite films (no foolin')
jonbecker034 November 2010
"Victormin" may think he's the only person who ever saw this film. But I saw it as well. I saw it on television about twenty or thirty years after HE saw it. What "Victormin" says about the film is correct. It is a concise, tightly presented feature. But I wouldn't label it as a product that came "out of Hollywood." It is definitely a West Coast product, yet it was produced far from the Hollywood mainstream. In fact I'd say that it's a production that emerged from the seedy underbelly of the film industry. (Despite its Christian theme, and despite the fact that Don Murray and David Nelson are such fine, upstanding exemplars of middle-class rectitude.) What I like about the project is that it has two directors to handle the two elements or "sides" of the story. Sex-obsessed skank (and I say it in a kind way) John Derek is there to show us the tough, gritty background of the Tom Harris character, and squeaky-clean David (son of Ozzie) Nelson is there to detail Harris's redemption. John Derek does double duty, working as cinematographer, and his washed-out "California sunshine" photography is effective. "Confessions of Tom Harris" is a "religious" picture, sure. But above and beyond that, it's a tough, kickin' indie flick with BALLS.
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