7.4/10
83,098
212 user 98 critic

Tootsie (1982)

Michael Dorsey, an unsuccessful actor, disguises himself as a woman in order to get a role on a trashy hospital soap.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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Popularity
2,639 ( 124)

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ON DISC
Won 1 Oscar. Another 24 wins & 30 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Sandy
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Ron
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Les
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Rita
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Jacqui
Peter Gatto ...
Rick
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Jo
Ronald L. Schwary ...
Phil Weintraub
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Mrs. Mallory
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Storyline

Michael Dorsey is an unemployed actor with an impossible reputation. In order to find work and fund his friend's play he dresses as a woman, Dorothy Michaels, and lands the part in a daytime drama. Dorsey loses himself in this woman role and essentially becomes Dorothy Michaels, captivating women all around the city and inspiring them to break free from the control of men and become more like Dorsey's initial identity. This newfound role, however, lands Dorsey in a hot spot between a female friend/'lover,' a female co-star he falls in love with, that co-star's father who falls in love with him, and a male co-star who yearns for his affection. Written by Bryan Kuniyoshi

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

This Is a Hell of a Way To Make a Living. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Romance

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

17 December 1982 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Would I Lie to You?  »

Box Office

Budget:

$22,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$5,540,470 (USA) (19 December 1982)

Gross:

$177,200,000 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.40 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Cinematographer Owen Roizman was initially opposed to Dorothy's character wearing glasses, as the reflective nature of their lenses tend to hamper lighting crews. After some tests, however, it was decided that glasses added a distinct, flattering dimension to Dorothy: Hoffman's prominent nose became less obtrusive and the glasses further feminized his personality, creating a more noticeable gender separation between the Dorothy/Michael characters. The glasses stayed, but a compromise was reached when Sydney Pollack suggested that the production try a special non-reflective coating developed by then Panavision head, Robert Gottschalk. The spray had been used to coat camera lenses, improving light transmission through the front elements. When the spray was used on Dorothy's glasses, it proved to be a godsend. See more »

Goofs

Throughout the film, the length of Michael's hair changes constantly between longer and shorter styles. See more »

Quotes

John Van Horne: I'm just an untalented old has-been.
Dorothy Michaels: Were you ever famous?
John Van Horne: No.
Dorothy Michaels: Then how can you be a has-been?
See more »

Crazy Credits

Dustin Hoffman is credited twice: Dustin Hoffman .... Michael Dorsey Dustin Hoffman .... Dorothy Michaels See more »

Connections

Referenced in Butch Jamie (2007) See more »

Soundtracks

It Might Be You
(1982)
Lyrics by Alan Bergman & Marilyn Bergman
Music by Dave Grusin
Sung by Stephen Bishop
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User Reviews

 
They Don't Get Better Than This
16 May 2005 | by (Ottawa, On) – See all my reviews

Remember when comedies used to be actual movies with actual stories with actual points and the funny just flowed out of them, instead of just a flimsy excuse to string together jokes and funny scenes and stock situations? Yeah, me too. What happened?

If you're in the mood for a great movie that will get you to cough up a boatload of honest laughs, then you ain't gonna do better than TOOTSIE. You are not going to find a better written, acted, and directed comedy anywhere. There are plenty as good - but none better. This is a career highpoint for all involved, and when "all" includes names such as Sydney Pollack and Dustin Hoffman, you know that's a sentiment that carries some significant weight.

And it just reaffirms the old adage that every single comedy should have Bill Murray in it.


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