5.5/10
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30 user 49 critic

Strange Invaders (1983)

Charlie's ex-wife disappears, and he travels to where she grew up--a rural town in the Midwest--to look for her. But, surprisingly, nobody knows about her or any of her many relatives, the ... See full summary »

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay) (as William Condon), (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
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1 win & 6 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Margaret
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Willie Collins
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Waitress / Avon Lady
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Arthur Newman
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Mrs. Bigelow
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Professor Hollister
Lulu Sylbert ...
Elizabeth
Joel Cohen ...
Tim
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Teen Boy (Prologue)
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Teen Girl (Prologue)
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Gas Station Attendant
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Storyline

Charlie's ex-wife disappears, and he travels to where she grew up--a rural town in the Midwest--to look for her. But, surprisingly, nobody knows about her or any of her many relatives, the Newmans. He meets aliens; but when he contacts the FBI, they don't believe him. He tells his story to a tabloid; and suddenly, he is chased by the aliens. Written by Mattias Thuresson

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Of all the worlds in all the galaxies...why did they pick this one? See more »

Genres:

Horror | Mystery | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

16 September 1983 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Extraños invasores  »

Filming Locations:


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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$655,461, 18 September 1983, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$1,362,303
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Bill Condon: The co-screenwriter appears in the 'National Informer's office, standing in the doorway listening in as Charles tells his story to Betty. See more »

Goofs

The red truck at the beginning of the movie that has the teenage couple in it keeps changing. The wooden side rails on the truck box disappear and reappear. See more »

Quotes

Mrs. Benjamin: [to FBI man, to whom she previously said that nobody takes the train any more] They took the train!
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Connections

References Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956) See more »

Soundtracks

Blue Moon
(uncredited)
Music by Richard Rodgers
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User Reviews

 
Fun 80's treat for fans of nostalgic 50's Sci-Fi.
18 December 2005 | by See all my reviews

"Strange Invaders" is a cheerful and likable 80's movie, regretfully forgotten these days because nowadays audiences don't understand the charm and inside jokes of authentic "Alien Invaders"-science fiction from the 1950's. This movie is one giant spoof/tribute to wonderful films such as "Invasion of the Body Snatchers" and "Invaders from Mars", but the screenplay is intelligent enough to add new and surprisingly original twists of its own. We have the typical remote American town – Centerville, Illinois – getting colonized by hideous aliens that take over the identities of the locals and examine the earthly life-style in the meantime. The ingenious elements in the script are, however, that this whole invasion-project was seemly approved by the government AND that the aliens never evolved after they landed on our planet. Centerville still looks like a swinging 50's town, with jukeboxes, old cars and traditional dress codes. University professor Charles Bigelow teams up with a gossip-journalist Betty Walker to investigate the town's bizarre secret. "Strange Invaders" is well-directed by Michael Laughlin ("Dead Kids") and cleverly co-written by Bill Condon. There's very few gore, which is a good thing, but the special effects are definitely not bad with a couple of adorable space-ship designs and the aliens' inventive method to "cristalyze" people. The acting performances are vivid, with Paul LeMat ("American Graffiti) and Nancy Allen ("Carrie", "Dressed to Kill"). The supportive cast is even better with spirited roles from Michael Lerner, Diana Scarwid and the wonderful Louise Fletcher, once again as the mean shrew. The happy-ending is somewhat lame and far too Disney/Steven Spielberg-like, but I suppose that's forgivable. Good, cheesy and nostalgic 80's entertainment.


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