6.4/10
1,648
57 user 7 critic

Rustlers' Rhapsody (1985)

PG | | Comedy, Western | 10 May 1985 (USA)
While the audience watches a black and white horse opera, a narrator's voice wonders what such a movie would be like today. Rex O'Herlihan, The Singing Cowboy, finds himself in color and ... See full summary »

Director:

Writer:

Reviews

Watch Now

From $2.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

ON DISC
1 nomination. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
...
...
...
...
Brant von Hoffman ...
Jim (as Brant Van Hoffman)
...
Jud
...
Blackie
...
Sheepherder No.1
...
Sheepherder No.2
Margarita Calahorra ...
Sheepherder's Wife
...
Town Doctor
...
Town Sheriff
Emilio Linder ...
Sheepherder in Saloon
Edit

Storyline

While the audience watches a black and white horse opera, a narrator's voice wonders what such a movie would be like today. Rex O'Herlihan, The Singing Cowboy, finds himself in color and enters a cliché-ridden town, in which the evil cattle baron (Andy Griffith) and the new Italian cowboys (who always wear raincoats no matter how hot it gets) join forces to get him and the sheep ranchers to leave the valley. Written by John Vogel <jlvogel@comcast.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

From the Director of 'Police Academy' See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Western

Certificate:

PG | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

10 May 1985 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Addio vecchio West  »

Edit

Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,374,973, 12 May 1985

Gross USA:

$6,090,497
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

| (Metrocolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The movie is "a parody of many Western conventions, most visibly of the singing cowboy films that were prominent in the 1930s and the 1940s" according to website Wikipedia. See more »

Goofs

After the big shoot out at the end of the film, in an overhead shot, the Railroad Colonel briefly disappears. See more »

Quotes

Colonel Ticonderoga: Let me just ask you one question. There's one thing I'm most curious about. Why bring the body here? My god, this is a home! People live here!
Jim: Well, Colonel, we didn't know exactly what to do with him.
Colonel Ticonderoga: Bury him! How 'bout that? Don't you think that's a good idea?
Jud: Oh, yes sir, yes sir, Colonel!
Colonel Ticonderoga: I mean, do you think that when somebody dies, they place them permanently on the family couch?
Jim: No sir.
Colonel Ticonderoga: Gee whi-iz!
See more »

Connections

Spoofs Once Upon a Time in the West (1968) See more »

Soundtracks

I Ride Alone
Written by Steve Dorff and Milton Brown
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

Better than its rating indicates if you like the genre
9 August 2003 | by See all my reviews

I didn't really understand on why this movie was rated so low, until I realized that to really enjoy this film you needed to grow up watching horse operas on Saturdays. This means to appreciate the humor, you're probably closer to 40 than 20 or spend a lot of time watching TVLand. From what I've seen most members here are closer 20. This movie satires the Saturday matinee western where you can tell the good guys in the white hats from the bad guys. So it would be better for those of us who saw and liked westerns before the "anti-hero" westerns of the late 60's to present. Where the cowboy star has a new set of duds on for each scene, foils the bad guys and gets the girl but would rather kiss the horse. The storyline is thin because they were all pretty much the same back in the 50's. That's part of the joke. I'd forgotten about this little gem until I was looking at Tom Berenger's credits. He and the rest of the cast were really good. It may not be a great movie but its definitely worth a watch. Favorite line G.W. Bailey saying "Gee Rex, you really ARE a good guy!" 7 out of 10


9 of 9 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 57 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Paul Scheer on Why There Are No Bad Movies

Paul Scheer discusses The Disaster Artist and his love of awesomely bad movies. Plus, we dive into the origins of midnight movies and explore how The Room became a cult classic.

Watch now