The Return of Sherlock Holmes (1986) - News Poster

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Sherlock Season 4 to premiere on New Year’s Day

It looks like people will be ringing in more than just the New Year on January 1st as the BBC has just revealed that Sherlock‘s fourth season will premiere on New Year’s Day with “The Six Thatchers”. This will be the first new episode of a Sherlock season in almost three years, save for its The Abominable Bride special last year.

Little is known about the fourth season, but it can be assumed that “The Six Thatchers” is a reference to Arthur Conan Doyle’s short story ‘The Adventure of the Six Napoleons’ collected in The Return of Sherlock Holmes.

Previously, Benedict Cumberbatch stated that this season might just be Sherlock‘s final, saying “It feels like the end of an era, to be honest. Series 4 goes to a place where it will be pretty hard to follow on immediately.”

Toby Jones was revealed to be playing one of the villains this season,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Long Before Downey Jr. There Was Gillette: Lost Holmes Movie Has Been Unearthed

'Sherlock Holmes' movie found at Cinémathèque Française (image: William Gillette in 'Sherlock Holmes') Sherlock Holmes, a long-thought-lost 1916 feature starring stage performer and playwright William Gillette in the title role, has been discovered in the vaults of the Cinémathèque Française. Directed by the all-but-forgotten Arthur Berthelet for the Chicago-based Essanay production company, the approximately 90-minute movie is supposed to be not only the sole record of William Gillette's celebrated performance as Arthur Conan Doyle's detective, but also the only surviving Gillette film.* In the late 19th century, William Gillette himself wrote the play Sherlock Holmes, which turned out to be a mash-up of various stories and novels featuring the detective, chiefly the short stories "A Scandal in Bohemia" and "The Final Problem." ("May I marry Holmes?" Gillette, while vying for the role, telegraphed Conan Doyle. The latter replied, "You may marry or murder or do What you like with him.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

'Sherlock' Season 3, or why 'Doctor Who' needs less Steven Moffat

It's a Steven Moffat showdown, as our favorite consulting detective demonstrated just how hard it is to watch "Doctor Who." For most fans, it isn't a question that they would choose to answer. "Doctor Who" versus "Sherlock" -- which show do you love more? But the return of "Sherlock" Season 3 has reminded us just how good a show helmed by Moffat can be -- and how bad "Doctor Who" now looks in comparison. 

Of course "Sherlock," unlike "Doctor Who," has two showrunners. Mark Gatiss joins Moffat as a co-creator, and it was actually Gatiss who wrote the "Sherlock" Season 3 opener, "The Empty Hearse." But as with all shows, just because the showrunner did not author that particular script does not mean that they weren't involved in the creative direction. In fact, we would be concerned if they weren't involved. 

"Sherlock" Season 3 episode 1 "The Empty Hearse" was funny, dramatic, surprising, and
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

10 Reasons Why Elementary Is Better Than Sherlock

CBS

Sherlock and Elementary have a great deal of things in common. This is to be expected, as they both follow a pretty standard pitch – to take Sherlock Holmes and place him and the other characters within his short stories and novels into a modern context. But the similarities are greater than that, due to the origins of Elementary which resulted in legal threats being issued by some of the Sherlock production staff. To explain, CBS approached the producers of Sherlock with the intent of remaking that show for an American audience. This didn’t go ahead, but then CBS separately created Elementary. In the words of Sherlock executive producer Sue Vertue on Twitter:

‘Mmm interesting CBS, I’m surprised no one has thought of making a modern day version of Sherlock before, oh hang on, we have!’

For those that have managed to miss the obvious, Sherlock is the
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

'Sherlock' Season 3 premiere: Holmes' impossible return in 'The Empty Hearse'

The "Sherlock" Season 3 does the near-impossible: Sherlock Holmes comes back from the dead. He and Watson even manage to get passed that little death issue as well, even if it does take **another brush or two with doom to inspire it.

Also, Sherlock likes Mary Morstan, Watson's fiancee. "The Empty Hearse" really is the most impossible episode of a crazy show. But somehow it all works.

How to fake a death ... three different ways

When the producers of "Sherlock" said that they had worked out exactly how Holmes had faked his death, they weren't kidding. There isn't just one explanation for how the detective fooled the world: There are three.

The first explanation comes right at the beginning of the episode, from the mouth of Lestrade's odd, ex-detective friend. According to this guy, Sherlock strapped on a bungee cord and bounced through Molly Hooper's window instead of dying. Mycroft's people,
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

Photo: BBC Sherlock's New Nemesis

Lars Mikkelsen, brother of actor Mads Mikkelsen and a talent in his own right, will serve as a major antagonist in the upcoming third series of the BBC's "Sherlock".

Producer Sue Vertue revealed the first photo of Mikkelsen in character today, that of Charles Augustus Magnussen.

The character is based on Charles Augustus Milverton, the "king of blackmailers" who appears in one of Arthur Conan Doyle's short stories from "The Return of Sherlock Holmes".

He's also a man who "causes Holmes more revulsion than any of the 50-odd murderers in his career."
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Terence Longdon obituary

Distinctive, durable British character actor on stage and screen

Terence Longdon, who has died of cancer aged 88, was a character actor whose parted hair and thick-set face – though not his name – were familiar for several decades. Only once did he step into the spotlight at the top of the bill, when he starred as the title character in the television series Garry Halliday (1959-62). The almost-forgotten BBC children's adventure programme, based on books by Justin Blake, perfectly fitted Longdon's educated, smooth, well-mannered persona – and a man who had flown with the Fleet Air Arm during the second world war. The actor played a Biggles-like commercial airline pilot, with Terence Alexander as his co-pilot, Bill Dodds. Posing a constant threat to the Halliday Charter Company was "The Voice", an arch-villain who sat behind a two-way mirror and shone a light into the faces of his gang members, keeping his own in darkness.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Terence Longdon obituary

Distinctive, durable British character actor on stage and screen

Terence Longdon, who has died of cancer aged 88, was a character actor whose parted hair and thick-set face – though not his name – were familiar for several decades. Only once did he step into the spotlight at the top of the bill, when he starred as the title character in the television series Garry Halliday (1959-62). The almost-forgotten BBC children's adventure programme, based on books by Justin Blake, perfectly fitted Longdon's educated, smooth, well-mannered persona – and a man who had flown with the Fleet Air Arm during the second world war. The actor played a Biggles-like commercial airline pilot, with Terence Alexander as his co-pilot, Bill Dodds. Posing a constant threat to the Halliday Charter Company was "The Voice", an arch-villain who sat behind a two-way mirror and shone a light into the faces of his gang members, keeping his own in darkness.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Edward Hardwicke obituary

Actor best known as a valiant Dr Watson in Granada's Sherlock Holmes series

For eight years from 1986, Edward Hardwicke, who has died aged 78, was the face of Dr Watson on television, proving a valiant and reliable foil to the dashing, neurasthenic Holmes of Jeremy Brett in the Granada series The Return of Sherlock Holmes, followed by the Casebook and the Memoirs, as well as stand-alone versions of The Sign of Four (1987) and The Hound of the Baskervilles (1988). The role was a perfect fit for an actor who had played important supporting roles for a similar length of time in Laurence Olivier's National theatre company at the Old Vic, but it also demonstrated his lightness of touch as well as his sturdiness.

His Watson was not an amiable old pudding-faced duffer in the style of Nigel Bruce in the series of films and radio series opposite Basil Rathbone in the 1940s; instead,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Actor Hardwicke Dies

  • WENN
Actor Hardwicke Dies
British actor Edward Hardwicke has died, aged 78.

The star, best known for playing Dr. Watson opposite Jeremy Brett's Sherlock Holmes on U.K. TV in the 1980s, passed away on Monday.

Hardwicke appeared as the detective's sidekick in The Return of Sherlock Holmes for eight years, before moving on to beloved British shows Lovejoy, Agatha Christie's Poirot and Shameless.

The actor also more recently appeared in movies including Love Actually and Roman Polanski's Oliver Twist.

He is survived by two daughters, Kate and Emma.

Books: Book Review: Graham Moore: The Sherlockian

Sherlock Holmes is just the most visible figure in a sleuthing tradition that stretches from Edgar Allan Poe’s C. Auguste Dupin to Dr. Gregory House, but more than any other professional epiphanizer, Holmes has taken on a life separate from his creator, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. In addition to occasionally being transplanted from his native 19th-century London and starring in numerous comic-book and film adaptations—including 1929’s The Return Of Sherlock Holmes, which introduced the world to “Elementary, my dear Watson”—the great detective has also spawned organizations like The Baker Street Irregulars, the group of feverishly fanboyish ...
See full article at The AV Club »

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