7.0/10
273
5 user 6 critic

Travelling North (1987)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Drama | 19 June 1987 (USA)
After their late-life marriage, a middle-aged Australian couple move to the countryside. Their life and tempestuous marriage is detailed.

Director:

Writers:

(play), (screenplay)
Reviews
5 wins & 2 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Frank
...
Frances
Henri Szeps ...
Saul
...
Freddie
Michele Fawdon ...
Helen
Diane Craig ...
Sophie
...
Joan
Drew Forsythe ...
Martin
John Gregg ...
Jim
Rob Steele ...
Syd
John Black ...
Alan
Roger Oakley ...
Stan
Joe MacColum ...
Boat owner
Nick Holland ...
Waiter
Steve Shaw ...
Estate agent
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Storyline

After their late-life marriage, a middle-aged Australian couple move to the countryside. Their life and tempestuous marriage is detailed.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A Journey into love, tears and laughter

Genres:

Comedy | Drama

Certificate:

PG-13 | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

19 June 1987 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Travelling Man  »

Box Office

Gross:

$214,722 (USA)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

(Eastmancolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Final screen performance of Graham Kennedy. See more »

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User Reviews

 
A film to show who you may someday be.
16 March 2010 | by (Nova Scotia, Canada) – See all my reviews

You see, the thing about a film like "Traveling North" is that it depends wholly and completely on the characters. Your enjoyment of a film like this hinges directly on how much you can identify with these people. Personally, I see a lot of my grandfather in the character of Frank (Leo McKern). There's a depth and painful personality to this role. He draws you in to his personal charm, but not without making it apparent just how hard to live with he can be.

There's a lack of larger conflict to the script which shows just how dedicated the story is to simply reflecting real life. You are privy to actual human interaction in this film, with very little in the way of distraction from that goal. Carl Schultz directs David Williamson's writing with a close, personal focus. It's refreshing in a time when most films seem to have far too much happening in them. Williamson has written dialogue that is both very real and intensely witty. Overall, this is a soft, quiet film. Abrasive for some of its characters, but only so much as needed.


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