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The Doors (1991)

The story of the famous and influential 1960s rock band The Doors and its lead singer and composer, Jim Morrison, from his days as a UCLA film student in Los Angeles, to his untimely death in Paris, France at age 27 in 1971.

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(as J. Randal Johnson),
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3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Josh Evans ...
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Dog
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Cat
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Engineer - Last Session
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Mom
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Dad
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Storyline

Oliver Stone's homage to 1960s rock group The Doors also doubles as a biography of the group's late singer, the "Electric Poet" Jim Morrison. The movie follows Morrison from his days as a film student in Los Angeles to his death in Paris, France at age 27 in 1971. The movie features a tour-de-force performance by Val Kilmer, who not only looks like Jim Morrison's long-lost twin brother, but also sounds so much like him that he did much of his own singing. It has been written that even the surviving Doors had trouble distinguishing Kilmer's vocals from Morrison's originals. Written by Denise P. Meyer <dpm1@cornell.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

The Ultimate Story of Sex, Drugs & Rock 'N' Roll See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for heavy drug content, and for strong sexuality and language | See all certifications »

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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

1 March 1991 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ha-Dlatot  »

Box Office

Budget:

$38,000,000 (estimated)

Gross:

$35,183,792 (USA)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

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(analog 70 mm prints)| (digital 35 mm and 70 mm prints)| (analog 35 mm prints)

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Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the film, the band is signed after being fired from Whiskey-a-Go-Go. In real life, they were signed by Elektra Records on August 18, 1966. Whiskey-a-Go-Go fired the band on August 21, after Morrison used acid induced, profane, Oedipus Rex lyrics. See more »

Goofs

At the bar, Jim drinks Miller Genuine Draft, which was not available until the late 1980s. See more »

Quotes

Jim Morrison: I'm a fake hero.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Hollywood Mouth 2 (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Moonlight Drive
Written by The Doors
Performed by Val Kilmer
Elektra Records
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User Reviews

 
A refreshing cinematic breakthrough in an era in which cinema seems all but forgotten!
3 December 2000 | by (Dallas, Tx) – See all my reviews

This film is truly a gem. The Doors is easily the best film of the rock n' roll genre and at least one of the most important films of its era. Though I am not an Oliver Stone fan I must give credit where it is due. Stone really does a terrific job with this film, and shows what he is capable of when he actually knows about the subject he is attempting to comment on. A few of the scenes in the film are almost exact recreations of actual events. However, the magnificent thing about this film is that it manages to recreate a certain amount of reality while simultaneously realizing that for a film to possess its own vitality it must transcend the preexisting reality, move beyond the surface, beyond everything that is obvious, and express and explore something deeper. Val Kilmer delivers a powerful performance in which he almost seems to be channeling the energy of Jim Morrison, and though I've seen many of Meg Ryan's films this is the only one I can recollect where she does such a good job that she makes you really forget about her and focus on the character. The cinematography of the film by Robert Richardson (Platoon, Wall Street, Born on The Fourth of July, Natural Born Killers, Casino, Bringing out the Dead, and many more) is bold and unique making the film one of the most distinct visual films I've ever seen. This film is truly one of a kind, and breaks through into new cinematic territory, giving priority to the visual aspects of the film in an era where there are so few films that even give much consideration to the single most important aspect of the motion picture. The genius of this film is that it is visual-audio as opposed to audio-visual and is more concerned with expressing something than simply impressing the audience. The Doors is a refreshing cinematic breakthrough in an era in which cinema seems all but forgotten.


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