6.1/10
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172 user 102 critic

The Replacement Killers (1998)

A troubled hitman seeks aid from a forger to help him get papers to China. However, the drug lord has hired replacements to finish the job, and kill the hitman.

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Writer:

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ON DISC
1 nomination. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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John Lee (as Chow Yun-Fat)
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Michael Kogan (as Jurgen Prochnow)
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Loco (as Clifton Gonzalez Gonzalez)
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Hunt (as Carlos Gomez)
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Rawlins
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Lam
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Alan Chan
Andrew J. Marton ...
Stevie
Sydney Coberly ...
Sara
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Storyline

John Lee is the best hitman money can buy. But when John refuses to kill because of the seven year-old son of his target, John's bosses send someone after John to kill him and then take his place in the ring of hitmen. John then teams up with Meg Coburn to help him escape these "Replacement Killers." Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

When people need to disappear, they come to see Meg. When they're about to go, they never see John coming. See more »

Genres:

Action | Crime | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong violence and for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

|

Release Date:

6 February 1998 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Asesinos sustitutos  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$30,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$8,046,553, 8 February 1998, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$18,967,571, 19 April 1998

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$35,100,000
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (extended cut)

Sound Mix:

| (8 channels)

Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Also the first American film for Til Schweiger, who already was a major movie star in his native Germany at the time. Number of words his character, one of the title's replacement killers, speaks: zero. See more »

Goofs

In the alleyway, when John pulls out a pistol for the third time, he shoots a man on a fire escape, but no report from the gun is heard, nor is a flash seen. See more »

Quotes

John Lee: I'll need guns.
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Connections

Features Magoo's Private War (1957) See more »

Soundtracks

Keep Hope Alive
Written by Ken Jordan and Scott Kirkland
Performed by The Crystal Method
Courtesy of Outpost Recordings
Under license from Universal Music Special Markets
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Hits the center of the bulls-eye with hair-raising accuracy.
17 April 2002 | by See all my reviews

Wild and absolutely menacing thriller involving Chow Yun-Fat (in his American film debut) as John Lee, a quiet yet resourceful hit-man who along with a sarcastic forger, Meg Coburn (Mira Sorvino), become involved when Lee refuses to take out someone close to a cop (Michael Rooker), who shot and killed his mobster boss' drug-dealing son during a drug bust and in the process, Coburn and Lee are also targeted by his superiors.

It's a brilliant debut for Yun-Fat and director Antoine Fuqua ("Bait", "Training Day"), both of whom show their skills with such respect. Some of the shoot-outs that take place in some areas that you wouldn't even think of (car wash, alley, movie theater, etc.). Plus, the cinematographer Peter Lyons Collister and composer Harry Gregson-Williams excell in making the movie even more entertaining. The scenery has a very colorful and artistic look to it and the music doesn't get too loud. I think of the movie as "Lethal Weapon" made like in the style of John Woo, who is one of the film's producers.

"The Replacement Killers" certainly hits the center of the bulls-eye with hair-raising accuracy.


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