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The Godfather Trilogy: 1901-1980 (1992)

R | | Crime, Drama, Thriller | Video
The multigenerational saga of the rise and fall of the Corleone crime family.

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, (novel)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Don Michael Corleone (archive footage)
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Tom Hagen (archive footage)
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Kay Adams (archive footage)
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Connie Corleone Rizzi (archive footage)
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Don Vito Corleone (archive footage)
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Sonny Corleone (archive footage)
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Fredo Corleone (archive footage)
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Young Vito Corleone (archive footage)
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Vincent Mancini (archive footage)
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Peter Clemenza (archive footage)
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Hyman Roth (archive footage)
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Frankie Pentangeli (archive footage)
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Mary Corleone (archive footage)
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Al Neri (archive footage)
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Don Altobello (archive footage)
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Storyline

This direct-to-video feature re-edits the three Godfather films into one cohesive package. The saga of the Corleone Family is told in chronological order, and numerous scenes that were deleted from each film have been restored. Written by Phil Fernando

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Genres:

Crime | Drama | Thriller

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence and language | See all certifications »
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Also Known As:

Kmotr 1, 2, 3  »

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| (DVD) | (longer)

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(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Vito Corleone, Clemenza and Tessio are going to the gunsmith the owner's name is Augustino Coppola, later he introduces his son, Carmine Coppola, who demonstrates his flute playing abilities. This scene is a tribute to Francis Ford Coppola's father and grandfather. His father was the first flautist with the NBC symphony under Arturo Toscanini. His grandfather was an actual gunsmith. His father worked in the "shop" from time to time as a child. They both insist the event actually happened. See more »

Goofs

As the Corleone's pack up to move to Las Vegas, there is a real estate sign outside the compound offering the property for commercial development. Later, Michael meets Frankie Pentangeli in his father's old (redecorated) house. See more »

Quotes

Don Michael Corleone: It's not personal, Sonny. It's strictly business.
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Connections

Edited from The Godfather: Part III (1990) See more »

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User Reviews

A truly fascinating and well-devised saga.
14 August 1999 | by (London, England) – See all my reviews

In 1972 and 1974 Francis Ford Coppola in association with novel-writer Mario Puzo created two of the most critically acclaimed films in motion picture history, and either of them being strong contenders for the best picture ever made. Sixteen years later, Coppola and Puzo teamed up again to create an intriguing third installment, continuing the incredible saga set around 20 years after the events portrayed in the first two films. Now we can see all three superb films combined, carefully and effectively edited and containing scenes previously cut from original theatre versions. "The Godfather Trilogy: 1901-1980" is one of the finest pieces of cinema art.

The truly epic and grandness of the saga can now be appreciated in its full when the whole 9hrs and 32mins can be seen at once, what's more, it is in perfect chronological order.

The trilogy begins with The Young Vito Corleone (Robert DeNiro) and his rise to power in New York, this originally being a prologue to "The Godfather, Part II" is now placed right at the start of the saga, making the later flashbacks of DeNiro much more effective and it sets the scene beautifully for the following wedding scene at the beginning of the original "Godfather" film. Instead of being plunged into exposition far too quickly, as in the original cut of the first film, the exposition here is much more effective. The scene takes place at the wedding of the ageing Vito's (Marlon Brando) daughter Connie (Talia Shire) and it introduces his three sons, Sonny (James Caan), Fredo (John Cazale) and Michael (Al Pacino) along with Vito's adopted son and lawyer Tom Hagen (Robert Duvall), soon we are presented with the familiar though very interesting plot, including severed horse's heads, a lot of gunfire and various questions of morality. The final scene of the first film is immediately followed by the continuation of the same plot in "The Godfather, Part II," this being another masterful act of editing. The consequences at the end of the second film (particularly the death of Fredo) are therefore a lot more harrowing and effective.

Soon, we are elegantly taken to the events surrounding the ageing Michael Corleone, including the surviving members of the original films and also introducing a whole new generation of people including Sonny's illegitimate son Vincent (Andy Garcia) and Michael's own daughter (Sofia Coppola), and there is another opposition character in the form of Joey Zasa (Joe Mantegna) and so the story continues, this with an even more grim and equally powerful finale.

On a whole, this is simply a masterpiece, the story exceedingly effective (being based from Mario Puzo's successful novels) and the acting (particularly in the first two films) impeccable. To see it is more of an experience than anything else.


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