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The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)

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Gandalf and Aragorn lead the World of Men against Sauron's army to draw his gaze from Frodo and Sam as they approach Mount Doom with the One Ring.

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(novel), (screenplay) | 2 more credits »
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235 ( 13)
Top Rated Movies #8 | Won 11 Oscars. Another 197 wins & 122 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Noel Appleby ...
Everard Proudfoot
...
Elanor Gamgee (as Alexandra Astin)
...
Sam
...
Gondorian Soldier 3
...
Madril
...
Boromir
...
...
...
Sadwyn Brophy ...
Eldarion
Alistair Browning ...
Damrod
...
Richard Edge ...
...
Uruk 2
...
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Storyline

The final confrontation between the forces of good and evil fighting for control of the future of Middle-earth. Hobbits: Frodo and Sam reach Mordor in their quest to destroy the "one ring", while Aragorn leads the forces of good against Sauron's evil army at the stone city of Minas Tirith. Written by Jwelch5742

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

orc | epic | battle | journey | hobbit | See All (274) »

Taglines:

The eye of the enemy is moving. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for intense epic battle sequences and frightening images | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

|

Release Date:

17 December 2003 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Return of the King  »

Box Office

Budget:

$94,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$1,764,458 (Austria) (19 December 2003)

Gross:

$377,845,905 (USA) (28 June 2011)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Blu-Ray Extended Edition) | (Special DVD Extended Edition) | (DVD Widescreen Edition)

Sound Mix:

| |

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Lawrence Makoare, when wearing the Gothmog make-up, was called "Pimplehead" by extras who didn't know his name. See more »

Goofs

At the beginning of the film, Gandalf confronts Saruman at Orthanc. Saruman is standing on the top-most platform of Orthanc 500 feet above the ground, while Gandalf and his party are standing very close to the bottom of the tower. It is clear from the elevated camera angles that those on the ground would have to be looking almost straight up to be able to see Saruman, and Saruman would have to be leaning out over the edge looking nearly straight down to be able to see those on the ground. Thus the entire scene is logistically impossible as depicted. The actors on the ground are not looking up nearly high enough to see Saruman, and when Legolas shoots his bow he is not aiming high enough to reach the top of the tower. Saruman is not close enough to the edge to even be visible from the base of the tower, and Wormtongue is even further back than Saruman, yet he is somehow shot by Legolas from below. Finally, it would not be possible for them to hear and speak to one another at that distance. It would be like standing on top of a 50 story building (Orthanc is 500 feet tall) casually talking to someone on the ground. That is why in the book, Saruman and Wormtongue speak to Gandalf from a window above the entrance, instead of from the top of the tower. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Deagol: Smeagol, I've got one! I've got a fish, Smeag. Smeagol!
Smeagol: Pull it in. Go on. Go on. Go on. Pull it in.
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Crazy Credits

Christopher Lee, who played Saruman in the film was not originally credited at the end of the film as all the other main characters were because he did not appear in the theatrical version. For the Extended DVD however, he does appear in the film and justly gets his drawn character and name credit with the other actors. See more »

Connections

Referenced in Atop the Fourth Wall: Watchmen (2009) See more »

Soundtracks

Aragorn's Coronation
Music by Viggo Mortensen
Lyrics by J.R.R. Tolkien
Performed by Viggo Mortensen
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
The problem with imagination
22 January 2005 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Overall, I am disappointed, though not surprised, by the negative criticism of this movie. Indeed, this criticism exceeds the offering of alternative viewpoints and the expression of other cinematic possibilities and sinks into the realm of bitter invective. So many armchair critics are currently competing with avid Tolkien, Jackson, and movie fans alike in order to espouse the "true" value of Peter Jackson's landmark movie trilogy. For it is a landmark event in cinema history based on its sheer size and careful attention, praise and evisceration apart. The issue that greatly irritates me and pushes me to write is that many of the negative reviewers on this website have such limited room in their imagination that they cannot conceive of a world outside their own narrow framework. I find that a most sad reality in light of the legacy of Tolkien, Jackson, and all good story-tellers -- to create, to engender, and to nourish the growth of any and all imaginative ventures.

The problem with imagination is that it is an individual event, a unique subjective experience that a single person experiences completely alone. Those who enter into the realm of Art, Fiction, Fantasy, and any degree of Story-telling agree (willingly or no) to take that personal act of creation and primal nature and share it with the community of human beings, each of whom has his or her own imaginative context. It is a bold act of sacrifice, self-confidence, and faith (spiritual, one could argue) to thrust the contents of one's subjective reality into (to borrow from Douglas Adams) the Whole Sort of General Mish Mash. People who do so deserve respect for the mere creative act, the ability to foist forward what they believe is true. From Homer to Bill O'Reilly, this concept of personal creation, what Tolkien called Sub-Creation, is the essence of modern human existence, and we owe it to each other to respect the right to creation history has granted us.

Therefore, in defense of both Tolkien (whom some on this website have maligned) and Jackson (whom many have maligned), I forward that both are imaginative creators in their own right, with different and completely acceptable offerings to the world. Those who cannot tolerate either for "mediocre writing" or "atrocious film-making" should offer forth their literary or cinematic offspring instead of cunningly-worded diatribes of their deep dissatisfaction with all that does not conform to their inner reality. Then, we few who believe in and trust the creative ability of all will be able to see how those critical inner realities (so authoritative in exposition) match up with the rest of our perceptions.

Tolkien was an enormously talented, intelligent, and imaginative man, one whose stories, though unpolished by experience, still managed to attract a worldwide audience and devoted following with their luster. Jackson's movies took the sheen and inherent value of Tolkien's stories and placed it in a visual medium, a place where fans of LOTR could witness and love the events and people they held so dear. Of course Tolkien's story is imperfect; of course Jackson's movies aren't as full as we wish them to be. Their great successes are that they still manage to capture our imagination, to move us, to take genuine truth and isolate it in a world outside our ken, a place where we see ourselves better against a foreign backdrop. Both have created and done so masterfully, with the intuitive grasp that is termed "genius." Tolkien would have had much at issue with Jackson's movies, where plot incongruities, lapsed character development, and visual splendor overshadow the philological and melancholic overtones of his book. Jackson admits he finds much at issue with Tolkien's book, including a lack of clear character motivation, extended and largely extraneous dialog, and heightened language not suited for Hollywood. But Tolkien, despite his perfectionist griping and loathing for any film version of his book, would respect Jackson for continuing the act of creation, for taking his modern-day mythology and spreading it to as many people as possible. Jackson has taken the beauty, the scope, the complexity, the richness, and the loss that permeate Middle-Earth and shared those leitmotifs with the world. Tolkien's characteristic "niggling" would have prevented any such attempt (even Jackson's), but in the end, his heritage lives on in beautifully conceived and executed films.

I do not ask others to stifle their opinions of this movie or any other. Indeed, continue to express the direst and bleakest of your frustrations with the creative power of others, as it may lead you to actually do some creation yourself. Remember though, that the great evils of history, from Satan to Hitler to Sauron, are never capable of creation -- only twisting, mutilating, mocking, deforming, and misapplying. Be open to the vision of others and what they have to offer, especially when that offering comes in the virtuosic shape of Tolkien's writing or Jackon's movies. Look for the True in the Secondary and how it manifests itself everywhere once you recognize it.

This movie receives a 10 from me because it not only maintains incredible faithfulness to Tolkien's themes (and yes, events may deviate in completely separate and dissimilar media) but it asks intelligent viewers to look deeper into the circumstances of its own creation and beauty. From the loyalty of Sam and the weight of epic history to the sacrifice of Arwen and the never-completely-won nature of war, Jackson's movies capture the essence and heart of Tolkien's tale, with the benefit of the director's own imaginative fruit as well. The world owes Mr. Jackson its gratitude, as he has created another world and another reality that so many can, do, and will cherish.

One final word: There are few who would not rather be wandering in a far green country rather than dwelling in their own Circles of the World.


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