6.1/10
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140 user 87 critic

The Kid (2000)

An unhappy and disliked image consultant gets a second shot at life when he is mysteriously confronted by an eight-year-old version of himself.

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1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Amy
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Sam Duritz (as Daniel Von Bargen)
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Susan Dalian ...
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Newsstand Cashier (as Vernee Watson Johnson)
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Storyline

Russ Duritz (Bruce Willis) is a wealthy L.A. image consultant, but as he nears 40, he's cynical, dogless, chickless, estranged from his father (Daniel von Bargen), and he has no memories of his childhood. One night he surprises an intruder (Spencer Breslin), who turns out to be a kid, almost 8 years old. There's something oddly familiar about the chubby lad, whose name is Rusty. The boy's identity sparks a journey into Russ's past that the two of them take - to find the key moment that has defined who Russ is. Two long-suffering women look on with disbelief: Russ's secretary, Janet(Lily Tomlin), and his assistant, the lovely Amy, to whom Rusty takes a shine. What, and who, is at the end of this journey? Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Nobody ever grows up quite like they imagined.

Genres:

Comedy | Family | Fantasy

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG for boxing action and mild thematic elements | See all certifications »

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Details

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Release Date:

7 July 2000 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Disney's The Kid  »

Box Office

Budget:

$65,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$12,687,726 (USA) (9 July 2000)

Gross:

$69,691,949 (USA)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Jerry Goldsmith was the original composer for the film. He wrote music for the film before it was shot, and this music was then used as a temporary score during editing, and for test screenings. He spoke about this at the Director's Guild at the time. He said this was the first time he had ever done this. Unfortunately, he never got to do the final music for the finished film, and was replaced as the composer. See more »

Goofs

When Rusty's father grabs him we see that he grabs his shirt but in the next shot the father is gripping Rusty by the shoulders. See more »

Quotes

Russ Duritz: Toshiya, let me ask you something. If you get called a jerk four times in a single day, does that make it true?
Amy: What, only four? Did you get up late?
Russ Duritz: Excuse me, I'm asking Toshiya.
Toshia: Four times is a pattern. It have to be five times to be a fact.
Russ Duritz: Thank you. See? There's hope after all.
Amy: Jerk.
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Crazy Credits

Rich Eisen.........Stuart Scott See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Holiday (2006) See more »

Soundtracks

(Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher And Higher
Written by Carl Smith, Gary Jackson and Raynard Miner
Performed by Jackie Wilson
Courtesy of Brunswick Records
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User Reviews

 
No kidding - I loved it!
11 July 2000 | by (Vancouver, BC) – See all my reviews

The Kid - At 39 years old Russel Duritz has a life that most men would envy

  • he has a great job, is respected (and feared), has a beautiful house and
makes buckets of money. But everything comes at a cost, in this case no social life, no conscience and a fear of spending the rest of his life alone. He just needs someone to show him the way.

As I watched the movie, I kept wondering why Disney didn't pass this film on to Miramax - not because it's particularly daring or edgy, but because it is clearly a movie for adults. This is exacerbated by the marketing campaign which is clearly targeting children - it is lumped in with trailers for "Rugrats the Movie", and "Pokemon 2000" (aren't they passe yet?). But I quibble.

I was impressed by the sensitive treatment of the subject matter - rather than the typical male midlife crisis that involves some pathetic sap buying a Porsche convertible and acting like a moron, Willis' character undertakes some serious introspection and takes stock of his life. His guide on this journey of self-discovery is himself at age 8 (they never explain how Rusty arrives and frankly, I didn't care). Young Rusty's innocence and unbridled optimism give him a distinct advantage in divining the truth - he sums up Russell's job as an image consultant thusly, "You teach people how to lie and pretend to be something they aren't". In order for a good script to succeed, however, you need actors to bring it to life. Not a problem here.

Although Willis has thrice ignored W.C. Fields' warnings about starring with children or animals he has lucked out once again, meshing as well comedically with Breslin as he did dramatically with Osment. Willis manages to balance Russell's cutthroat powerbroker traits with vulnerability and confusion, without becoming ridiculous. Breslin meanwhile gives a dead on portrayal of a kid from everyone's childhood - the one that always stuck out for some reason and got picked on. We also get two bonus performances: Lily Tomlin is great as Russell's levelheaded assistant and Jean Smart is perfect as an insightful charming anchorwoman (I loved her in "Guinevere").

The Kid is charming, heavy, and real. And it will appeal to adults of all ages.


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