4.5/10
15,258
237 user 89 critic

Rape Me (2000)

Fuck Me (original title)
Unrated | | Crime, Drama, Thriller | 28 June 2000 (France)
Two young women, marginalised by society, go on a destructive tour of sex and violence. Breaking norms and killing men - and shattering the complacency of polite cinema audiences.

Directors:

, (co-director) (as Coralie Trinh Thi)

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) (as Coralie Trinh Thi) | 1 more credit »
3 nominations. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Romance (1999)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.3/10 X  

Although deeply in love with her boyfriend - and indeed sleeping in the same bed with him - a schoolteacher cannot handle the almost complete lack of intimacy he will allow. Increasingly ... See full summary »

Director: Catherine Breillat
Stars: Caroline Ducey, Sagamore Stévenin, François Berléand
Comedy | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.1/10 X  

A Love Story Of Two Women Who meet up in their late forties and attempt to retrieve the romance they had in their youth.

Director: Virginie Despentes
Stars: Emmanuelle Béart, Béatrice Dalle, Soko
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.6/10 X  

In a decript apartment, a young man watches as his father and a friend shoot an amateur porn film. Issues of morality, reality TV and friendship are explored.

Director: Lukas Moodysson
Stars: Thorsten Flinck, Björn Almroth, Sanna Bråding
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.4/10 X  

Reluctantly, a sulky adolescent returns to her parents' house for yet another boring summer vacation, dabbling in desire and the art of desirability, eventually mixing reality with vision, caged fantasies with the fierce female sexuality.

Director: Catherine Breillat
Stars: Charlotte Alexandra, Hiram Keller, Rita Maiden
Intimacy (2001)
Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.2/10 X  

A failed London musician meets once a week with a woman for a series of intense sexual encounters to get away from the realities of life. But when he begins inquiring about her, it puts their relationship at risk.

Director: Patrice Chéreau
Stars: Mark Rylance, Kerry Fox, Susannah Harker
Ken Park (2002)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.9/10 X  

Ken Park is about several Californian skateboarders' lives and relationships with and without their parents.

Directors: Larry Clark, Edward Lachman
Stars: Adam Chubbuck, James Bullard, Seth Gray
9 Songs (2004)
Drama | Music | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 4.9/10 X  

In London, England, love blooms between an American college student, named Lisa, and an English glaciologist, named Matt, where over the next few months in between attending rock concerts, the two lovers have intense sexual encounters.

Director: Michael Winterbottom
Stars: Kieran O'Brien, Margo Stilley, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Karen Lancaume ...
Nadine (as Karen Bach)
Raffaëla Anderson ...
Céline Beugnot ...
La blonde au billard
Adama Niane ...
Le garçon au billard
Christophe Claudy Landry ...
Le mec au comptoir
Tewfik Saad ...
Le serveur bar
Delphine McCarty ...
La colocataire (as Delphine Mc Carty)
Ouassini Embarek ...
Radouan
Patrick Kodjo Topou ...
Wanted (as Patrick-Kodjo Topou)
Simon Nahoum ...
Su copain
Karim Chala ...
Su copain
Lisa Marshall ...
La copine de Manu
Hacène Beddrouh ...
La frère de Manu
Patrick Eudeline ...
Francis
...
Mec 1 viol
Edit

Storyline

Manu and Nadine lose their last tenuous relationship with main-stream society when Manu gets raped and Nadine sees her only friend being shot. After a chance encounter, they embark on an explosive journey of sex and murder. Perhaps as a revenge against men, perhaps as a revolt against bourgeois society, but certainly in a negation - almost joyful in its senseless violence - of all the codes of a society which has excluded, raped and humiliated them. Controversial for its violence and real sex scenes: a vividly nihilist road movie set in France. Written by H. G. Ziche <hgz@ehess.fr>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama | Thriller

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

28 June 2000 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Rape Me  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$5,793 (USA) (29 April 2001)

Gross:

$5,793 (USA) (29 April 2001)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

, ,  »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

The stars and a director are adult film stars. See more »

Quotes

La colocataire: A girl with character scares men. They feel less virile. They are all sissies, that's what they are.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Un heureux événement (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Sweet Belly
Written and Performed by Wei Ji
(P) Pan-Européenne Musique
©2000 Pan-Européenne Musique
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
useful perhaps in looking at the issues it raises
23 September 2007 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

I'm not exactly a Francophile. I love the cooking but hate the restaurants. French is one of the great languages of the world, but I find the French attitude to it xenophobic. Yet there is one thing that always stirs my passion. I admire them for it. I wish we had an ounce of it in Britain.

The best known examples of course are the film protests in 1968 – a time when everyone was protesting about everything. But they helped, indirectly, to restore the international prestige of French cinema. When Baise-Moi was banned shortly after release in 2000, there were spontaneous street protests. Now this is a bit different – the film's artistic merits or lack of them are still a matter of debate. But I take my hats off to the French. I would love to see the British protest in the name of cinematic freedom. (The ban was eventually lifted after separate protests signed by Parisian intellectuals.)

As you will already have guessed, the issues around this film are complicated. And they get worse. There is a tendency to react emotively to any highly charged sexual issues. This tendency can maybe blind us somewhat when it comes to analysing more important ones.

This is a film made by women, about women living on the fringes of society. I was once importunate enough to argue with acclaimed filmmaker Gaspar Noé (after a public screening of Irreversible) that his film didn't address the issue of rape as well as Baise Moi. I still believe that, although Irreversible is a landmark film for other reasons entirely. Most films about rape follow male-orientated story lines. They often emphasise the purely physical, violence-aspect (as in Irreversible) or have a strong woman seeking and finding redress (as in The Accused). The reality is that most rape victims are traumatised mentally and emotionally. Physical hurt as a result of violence is no less an issue, but a separate one. Although The Accused looks at some of the metal trauma, it ultimately plays out as a success story. Few rape victims take on such a masculinised determination to succeed against the odds. Odds which are still stacked against the victim.

What I liked about Baise-Moi is that it eschews the woman-survivor scenario for a more realistic picture of lasting psychological damage. Films that show the real horror of rape may discourage it more than ones that show women 'getting over it.' One of the victims of rape in Baise-Moi actually 'lets' her assailants get on with it, commenting to her friend afterwards that at least they didn't wind up dead. The rape (and the violence) of Baise-Moi convinced me that she probably hedged her bets wisely. Her lack of struggle didn't, in my mind, make her any the less a victim. And neither did the unpleasant fact that she was a part-time prostitute make her any more 'deserving.' This is something that it is not easy to live with. As a society, we have moved past the point where a girl in a short skirt acting flirtatiously (The Accused) is 'asking for it' or 'deserving of rape.' But where is our cut-off point? The marginals in society are often seen as dispensable. No-one wants to acknowledge them – least of all mainstream filmmakers. Yet they can be just as much victims.

Another thing I like about Baise-Moi is that the two girls that form a bond and go on a road trip are fully developed as characters. Like most young women, they enjoy having a good time and going after boys. But they have been mentally scarred. One of them has been brutally gang-raped and the other has watched her only friend being killed. They are not 'good girls gone bad'. They are fairly 'bad' already. But they are still victims. Beneath their bravado their mental deterioration is apparent. In Black Snake Moan, the horrific effects of a redneck woman's history of sexual abuse and rape are given some time through Christina Ricci's great acting, but the plot is driven by male characters towards a stupid and not very believable conclusion. In Baise-Moi, it is the trauma that the women went through that drives the plot. (Sadly one of the main actresses, Karen Bach committed suicide in 2005.) The film is arguably weakened by a change of style. The initial scenes are very realistic, including the horrific rape. But then the main protagonists go on a killing spree reminiscent of Natural Born Killers on trash aesthetic. Perhaps this is appropriate – they live in la-la land as long as they can. But it will confuse some viewers.

"To reclaim women's rights over their true sexuality, to seize it back from the male gaze. It's always men who have a problem with a woman's sex: that's their problem, not ours." A noble aim by the filmmakers. But will feminists baulk when they realise that one of the directors and two of the stars have previously worked in hard-core pornography? "There's no logical reason why sex scenes should only be in porn," says Trinh Thi. Indeed, Hollywood agrees. I am sure there are convincing psychological arguments, but realistic sex still upsets many audiences (personally I have more of a problem with overly-realistic violence).

This analysis has outstayed its welcome. I have laboured the good points of the film and rated it accordingly. On a technical level, the idea of using only natural lighting also works well. But apart from its stand against censorship and the way it deals with rape, the film is lacking in many respects. It was made on a very small budget and it shows. The acting is acceptable but not much is demanded from actors in terms of interiorisation and so on. There's a good soundtrack. But the main reason to see the film may probably be to argue over the issues it raises.


26 of 34 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?