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Buy an Electric Refrigerator (1926)

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The Electric League of Pittsburgh encourages everyone to buy an electric refrigerator in this short. A hand is visible holding open a refrigerator door: inside are milk, lettuce, tomatoes ... See full summary »
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The Electric League of Pittsburgh encourages everyone to buy an electric refrigerator in this short. A hand is visible holding open a refrigerator door: inside are milk, lettuce, tomatoes or fruit, grapes, and a small platter of sliced meat or vegetables. In the freezer compartment are a couple of metal trays. A woman in an apron enters the frame, bends over, and picks up the platter. A title card discloses that an electric refrigerator provides convenience and comfort, promotes health, and is economical. A scrolling message invites all to the refrigerator show, April 5th to 19th on Liberty Avenue: free admission! Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

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Not Rated
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Advertising films for electric refrigerators, like this one, in the 1920s actually boosted sales of ice boxes instead. See more »

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What's to say about this piece of ephemera?!
21 December 2009 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

Wow...talk about a hard film to rate! This is a short snippet that is only about 30 seconds long and was used in the Pittsburgh area to announce the marvels of the new electric-style refrigerator (all had been non-electric models using ice up until that time). Since it was made for 1926 audiences, there was no sound and the theaters might have used some incidental music to make it a bit more interesting. However, the approach is rather dry and I doubt if it encouraged that many to run out and purchase one or go to the electric show the appliance was hawking. It just needed more pizazz--more than simply showing the inside of a new fridge. In other words "sex it up a bit" or use some gimmick to draw the curious. Still, it's good this sort of ephemeral piece has survived, as it is a part of our history--a dull part, to be sure.

Note: According to IMDb, this was copied at 24 frames per second (the standard for sound films). Because it was originally shown at somewhere between 16 and 22 frames per second (the rates varied), it would have run just a bit longer in 1926.


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