6.7/10
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Resurrecting the Champ (2007)

PG-13 | | Drama, Sport | 24 August 2007 (USA)
Up-and-coming sports reporter rescues a homeless man ("Champ") only to discover that he is, in fact, a boxing legend believed to have passed away. What begins as an opportunity to resurrect Champ's story and escape the shadow of his father's success becomes a personal journey as the ambitious reporter reexamines his own life and his relationship with his family.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) | 3 more credits »

On Disc

at Amazon

2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Polly
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Andrea Flak
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Perlmutter
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Marciano
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Whitley
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Ike Epstein
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Kenny
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Jaws
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Runt
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Storyline

A young journalist comes to the aid of a homeless man who claims he is a former heavy weight title contender. Seeing a chance to redeem his struggling career, the writer's story of the champ's life raises questions about the past that will threaten all he holds dear. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Based on a true story, that was based on a lie.

Genres:

Drama | Sport

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some violence and brief language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

24 August 2007 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

O Resgate de Um Campeão  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Budget:

$13,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

$1,667,659 (USA) (20 July 2012)

Gross:

$3,172,573 (USA) (20 July 2012)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the original article in the Los Angeles Times, the gentleman who first makes the journalist question the truth of "the champ's" identity is Ernie Terrell, a heavyweight contender who is perhaps most famous for being severely beaten by Muhammad Ali, after Terrell had refused to refer to Ali by his new name at the weigh-in for their fight, instead addressing Ali by his former name of Cassius Clay. See more »

Goofs

When Erik leaves Champ at the house they were conversing in front of, Champ is shown standing on the curb as he contemplates knocking on the door of the house. Then, as Erik is driving away, he looks into his rear-view mirror, and Champ is instantly shown standing in the middle of the street instead of on the curb. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Announcer: He lost to Harold Johnson and to Nino Valdez. That win to Valdez catapulted him into the national statistics spotlight also. Charles, 32 years old, Satterfield, 30. Here's round two. 189 for Charles, 180 for Satterfield. Charles is in the white trunks.
Erik Kernan Jr.: [narrating] A writer, like a boxer, must stand alone.
Announcer: Satterfield has surprised all tonight with his right.
Erik Kernan Jr.: Having your words published, like entering a ring, puts your talent on display. And there's nowhere to hide. The truth is ...
[...]
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Connections

References NFL Monday Night Football (1970) See more »

Soundtracks

Got Your Wealth
Written by Lee Silver
Performed by Lee Silver
Courtesy of Tru Gem Records
By Arrangement with PEN Music Group, Inc.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Fathers and Sons
27 June 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

I was lucky to preview this movie a few months back and needed some time to digest it. For those of you use to films by Rod Lurie, this movie will take you by surprise; in a very good way. I much enjoy Rod's films, and I did this one as well, but not for the reasons that I normally do. I have grown accustomed to his sharp whit and snappy screenplays as well as the fluidity of the cinematography. Resurrecting the Champ delivers all that, but in so many ways it was better than the Lurie movies I have learned to love. I think it is because Rod puts his heart into this film.

In the technical sense, the film is well directed and edited. The cast is spectacular with solid performances by all; including Alan Alda and Samuel L. Jackson. The characters are very believable and no one actor overshadows another. The film has balance. The movie is well paced and does not confuse the viewer. But what really makes this film excel is that Lurie leaves his comfort zone of the political thriller and really directs a movie that touches all viewers. This was a great risk for Rod, but it paid off because it resulted in a movie that will no doubt become the part of many film libraries.

While this move is set around a newspaper and boxing, this is really a movie about fathers and sons. It embraces the understanding that we are not all perfect and that it is OK not to be. It dwells at the dilemma of what fathers must do when their children find out that they have flaws, and the pressure sons have to live up to the heroics of their fathers. This is the kind of film that you will go and see and then talk about for hours afterwards. I have to wonder if Mr. Lurie is giving both his father and his son a gift with this film. I cannot wait for it to come out in the theaters so that I can take my sons to see it. Well done Rod!!


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