6.9/10
122
3 user 10 critic

Who Gets to Call It Art? (2006)

Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Henry Geldzahler reflects on the 1960s pop art scene in New York.

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Cast

Credited cast:
John Chamberlain ...
Himself
Ivan Karp ...
Himself
...
Himself
Frank Stella ...
Himself
Larry Poons ...
Himself
James Rosenquist ...
Himself
...
Himself
...
Himself
Mark Di Suvero ...
Himself
Ellsworth Kelly ...
Himself
...
Himself
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Richard Bellamy ...
Himself (archive footage)
Leo Castelli ...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
Willem de Kooning ...
Himself (archive footage)
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Storyline

Metropolitan Museum of Art curator Henry Geldzahler reflects on the 1960s pop art scene in New York.

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

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Details

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Release Date:

1 February 2006 (USA)  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$7,520 (USA) (5 February 2006)

Gross:

$27,344 (USA) (5 March 2006)
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Company Credits

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Did You Know?

Connections

Features Painters Painting (1973) See more »

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User Reviews

 
So, about that title...
30 September 2009 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

The name of this film is "Who Gets to Call it Art?". A more appropriate title might have been "Who Gets to Call it Art? Henry Geldzahler Does!" or maybe "Henry Geldzahler is Totes Awesome". This movie is relentlessly effusive and congratulatory about Geldzahler's life and work - it feels like an extended version of something you'd play at a banquet thrown in someone's honor, right before giving them a Lifetime Achievement Award.

That said, there's a lot of good stuff in this movie: there's great footage of influential New York artists in their youths along with more-recent interviews, and it provides a decent look at the fabled mid-20th-century New York art scene. It's worth 80 minutes of viewing-time for any art-lover, but it's not a satisfying piece of work.


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