Local gangster Frankie Barrow is running a protection racket and demands money from the Steptoes. Harold believes they need someone to defend them like in that film 'The Seven'... 'The ... See full summary »

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(uncredited)

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(by), (by)
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Cast

Episode cast overview:
Harry H. Corbett ...
Harold Steptoe
Wilfrid Brambell ...
Albert Steptoe
Henry Woolf ...
Frankie Barrow
Paddy Ryan
Tony Smart
Billy Horrigan
...
Gang Member (as Dougie Robinson)
Marc Boyle
Tim Condren ...
(as Tim Condron)
Aubrey Danvers-Walker
Ernest C. Jennings ...
(as Ernest Jennings)
David J. Grahame ...
(as David J. Graham)
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Storyline

Local gangster Frankie Barrow is running a protection racket and demands money from the Steptoes. Harold believes they need someone to defend them like in that film 'The Seven'... 'The Seven Year Itch?' suggests Albert. No, 'The Seven Samurai'. Albert assembles Shepherd's Bush's own answer to the Seven Samurai. They might be ancient but they see off Barrow and his heavies all right. Written by don @ minifie-1

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Comedy

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Release Date:

25 September 1974 (UK)  »

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1.33 : 1
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Connections

References Enter the Dragon (1973) See more »

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The Seven Steptoerai
8 February 2017 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

On the day when co-writer Alan Simpson has died, what better way to remember him and watch one of his classic comedies. This is a spoof of the 1970s king fu craze as Albert and his fellow old codgers exit the cinema excitedly as they have been to see Bruce Lee in Enter the Dragon.

Harold thinks he has purchased an expensive Oriental vase which turns out to be from Stoke but even worse they are menaced by a local gangster, Frankie Barrow (Henry Woolf) who demands 'insurance' money or his boys would cause some damage.

However Albert gets his old boys round to take on Barrow and his thugs and it seems they have the fists of fury as the thugs flee from the yard.

Woolf reprised his character from the film Steptoe and Son Ride Again. This is a divisive episode because the violence from Barrow's thugs smashing up the yard is jarring for a comedy show but the final showdown is a hoot as the goons get a beating from the old codgers who look to be more expert in Origami than Aikido.


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