The Twilight Zone (1959–1964)
6.7/10
893
16 user 2 critic

The Mind and the Matter 

Using the power of mind over matter, Archibald Beechcroft remakes the world to his own specifications.

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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
...
Archibald Beechcroft
...
Henry
Chet Stratton ...
Rogers
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Storyline

The intolerant Archibald Beechcroft is a misanthropic clerk of the Central Park Insurance Co. that hates everybody. When a colleague gives him a book about the power of the mind, Archibald reads the magic book and decides to wipe out the human race. However, he feels lonely and uses his ability to make the entire population of his city his perfect clone, discovering how hateful the world would be. Written by Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Certificate:

TV-PG
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Release Date:

12 May 1961 (USA)  »

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(Westrex Recording System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Goofs

At the 4:32 mark, in the upper left corner a boom mic shadow can be seen. See more »

Quotes

[closing narration]
Narrator: Mr. Archibald Beechcroft, a child of the twentieth century, who has found out through trial and error - and mostly error - that with all its faults, it may well be that this is the best of all possible worlds. People notwithstanding, it has much to offer. Tonight's case in point - in the Twilight Zone.
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User Reviews

 
A Malcontent
27 October 2014 | by (North America) – See all my reviews

Shelley Berman plays unhappy Insurance clerk Archibald Beechcroft, who is also deeply misanthropic, but one day, after reading a book about mental power given to him by a clumsy colleague(played by Jack Grinnage) he decides to put it to the test by wishing away the entire human race, which astonishingly succeeds, though Beechcroft finds that solitude isn't all he believed it to be, and tries to put his self-inflicted situation right. Silly episode is only moderately funny. Though Berman does his best, his character becomes annoying, and suffers from a lack of imagination more than anything else. Still, it's just passable, but little more.


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