Once (2007) - News Poster

(2007)

News

'Dancing With the Stars' Season 25, Week 4: Best Lifts, Kicks, Tricks and Flips!

'Dancing With the Stars' Season 25, Week 4: Best Lifts, Kicks, Tricks and Flips!
It was an emotionally charged night on Dancing With the Stars.

The 11 remaining contestants danced their hearts out to routines symbolizing their Most Memorable Year on Monday, moving us with their heartfelt, inspiring stories. Although a fan-favorite pair from the beginning, former NBA star Derek Fisher and his pro partner, Sharna Burgess, were eliminated at the end of the night, leaving us with the season 25 top 10.

From the best technical lifts to the most tear-filled performances, Et's breaking down all the memorable choreography moments from week four of the competition.

Watch: 'DWTS' Eliminates Fan Favorite After Tearful 'Most Memorable Year' Week -- Find Out Who Got Cut!

Frankie Muniz & Witney Carson - Quickstep, "Adventure of a Lifetime" by Coldplay

Most memorable year: 2017, celebrating a mix of everything he's done, and to now be in a position where he can inspire others. "I have gotten to do everything I've wanted," Frankie said in his interview package. "I just don't
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

‘Once’ Embodies the Musical Form with Uncommon Purity

Looking back on this still-young century makes clear that 2007 was a major time for cinematic happenings — and, on the basis of this retrospective, one we’re not quite through with ten years on. One’s mind might quickly flash to a few big titles that will be represented, but it is the plurality of both festival and theatrical premieres that truly surprises: late works from old masters, debuts from filmmakers who’ve since become some of our most-respected artists, and mid-career turning points that didn’t necessarily announce themselves as such at the time. Join us as an assembled team, many of whom were coming of age that year, takes on their favorites.

How much can you strip away the widest-known conventions of a genre before people will stop calling your film what it is? Many refer to Once as a “music film” instead of a musical, and it sort
See full article at The Film Stage »

Film Review: ‘Becks’

Film Review: ‘Becks’
Becks” is the kind of modest, non-earthshaking indie enterprise that ends up being so satisfying mostly because it’s about a character type familiar from real life but all too under-represented at the movies. In this case, that’s a woman — played with consummate lived-in assurance by Broadway veteran Lena Hall — whose primary personality traits would be considered banally typical if she were a slacker-type dude, yet they can still seem exotic and frightening to some when they come in the form of a young lesbian.

A not-yet-successful musician who parties too hard, horndogs too much and seeks gainful employment too little, Becks (née Rebecca) might be a staple in any gay scene. Still, she remains a stubborn outsider in the hometown she’s been forced back to in Elizabeth Rohrbaugh and Daniel Powell’s narrative feature debut. What happens during her stay there is not particularly surprising or original, but
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Celebrating Irishness at the Movies

And look at that, not a leprechaun in sight.

For a relatively small island with a tiny film industry, Ireland certainly gets a lot of representation in movies — sometimes via other places masquerading as Ireland, other times by representing other places (the beach landing scene in Saving Private Ryan was shot in Wexford, for example) or worlds (Ahch-To in The Force Awakens), and occasionally it even gets to play itself. The island also exports a rather impressive number of cinematic talents considering the fact that, though every third or forth person you meet on the street in, say, Boston or Chicago (a lot of places, really) will claim Irish heritage, the Republic of Ireland has a population of slightly less than 4.6 million and Northern Ireland slightly more than 1.8 million, bringing the island to a total of only around 6.4 million. In other words, still around 2 million less than before the Famine, over
See full article at FilmSchoolRejects »

25 films all but guaranteed to cheer you up

Joe Richards Mar 24, 2017

Need to find a bit of movie happiness? Here are 25 films that might just do the trick...

Let's face it, we could all probably do with a little bit of cheering up right about now. Times are scary and times are tough, so it's perfectly natural to look for some kind of reassurance that everything will indeed be all right in the end.

Film is perhaps one of the most powerful and effective tools in doing this. It can be a transportative experience, an escape from reality, and, most importantly, it can act as a reminder of all that is good in the world.

With that in mind, here’s a list of 25 movies that are almost-guaranteed to make you smile and restore your faith in humanity...

City Lights

In truth, any of Charlie Chaplin’s films are perfect for those times when you just need to smile.
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Don’t Knock Twice’ Exclusive Clip: Katee Sackhoff and Lucy Boynton Fight off a Disturbed Witch

  • Indiewire
‘Don’t Knock Twice’ Exclusive Clip: Katee Sackhoff and Lucy Boynton Fight off a Disturbed Witch
In the new horror film “Don’t Knock Twice,” there’s a disturbing urban legend involving a child-stealing witch living in an abandoned house. “Knock once to wake her from her bed, twice to raise her from the dead…” goes the rhyme, but when troubled teen Chloe (Lucy Boynton) raps at the door one night, she has no idea the horror she’s about to unleash. She flees to the country home of her estranged mother (Katee Sackhoff) — a former addict turned famous artist — and must learn to trust her after many years in order to stop the demon stalking them. It co-stars Nick Moran (“Lock, Stock and Two Smocking Barrels”), Richard Mylan (“The Upside of Anger”), Pooneh Hajimohammadi (“Words with Gods”), Jordan Bolger (“Peaky Blinders”) and more. Watch an exclusive clip from the film below.

Read More: ‘Don’t Knock Twice’ Trailer: Katee Sackoff and Her Kid Might Have
See full article at Indiewire »

‘A Dog’s Purpose’ Terrified Dog Video: Star Josh Gad and Director Lasse Hallström ‘Disturbed’ by Canine’s Treatment on Set

  • Indiewire
‘A Dog’s Purpose’ Terrified Dog Video: Star Josh Gad and Director Lasse Hallström ‘Disturbed’ by Canine’s Treatment on Set
TMZ has obtained footage from the set of the movie “A Dog’s Purpose” in which a handler is seen forcing a shaking German Shepherd into a pool of rapidly churning water as the dog attempts to scramble back up the side. Offscreen, a man can be heard saying: “You just gotta throw him in.” The video then cuts to show the dog in the water, his head disappearing below the surface, and the crew rushing over to him before someone yells, “Cut it! Cut it! Cut it!”

“A Dog’s Purpose” is produced by Amblin Entertainment, Walden Media, and DreamWorks. It is set to open in theaters nationwide on January 27th, but its intended audience of dog lovers might not be lining up anytime soon.

Read More: ‘Finding Dory’ Wins People’s Choice Award For Favorite Movie

Josh Gad (“Frozen”), who voices the movie’s dog protagonist, took to
See full article at Indiewire »

La La Land review – worth making a song and dance about

Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling lay on the charm in Whiplash director Damien Chazelle’s magical love letter to the golden age of Hollywood

The Australian film-maker Stephan Elliott once jokingly told me that he’d made The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert to bring screen musicals back from the grave into which Xanadu had put them. Yet despite reports of their death, musicals have never gone away, providing the backbone of the movie business in key territories such as India, and regularly flourishing elsewhere across the globe. In 2008, Phyllida Lloyd’s film of the Abba-fest Mamma Mia! became a record-breaking UK hit (paving the way for Sunshine on Leith et al), while stage-to-screen adaptations, from Chicago to Les Misérables, have consistently charmed Oscar voters in America.

Alongside Baz Luhrmann’s Moulin Rouge!, early 21st-century cinema has given us everything from Lars von Trier’s Dancer in the Dark
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

For ‘Sing Street’, Director John Carney Cast Musically-Oriented Non-Actors Who Could ‘Drive It Like They Stole It’

  • Deadline
For ‘Sing Street’, Director John Carney Cast Musically-Oriented Non-Actors Who Could ‘Drive It Like They Stole It’
Breaking onto the global stage with 2007's Once, a minimalist Irish musical which took the Oscar for Best Song, writer/director John Carney has had great success with a string of original musicals, including the Mark Ruffalo-starring Begin Again, and his latest, the Golden Globe-nominated Sing Street. In tandem with La La Land helmer Damien Chazelle, Carney is among a select few revitalizing the Hollywood musical. Sharing certain influences with that director—Singin’ in th…
See full article at Deadline »

The 11 Most Underrated Movies of 2016

The 11 Most Underrated Movies of 2016
Although 2016 is a record-breaking year in ticket sales at the U.S. box office, that statistic doesn’t tell the whole story. In fact, it’s the best of times and the worst of times at the movies. Big-screen epics like “Rogue One” are striking it rich, but independent movies have never had a tougher time competing for an audience’s limited attention.

For every “Captain America: Civil War” or “Finding Dory,” dozens of small- or medium-sized films went unnoticed in 2016. These feast-or-famine returns are part of the business, but the volume of prestige titles that are falling through the cracks is growing. The new economic reality is that fledgling distributors don’t know how to sell as many tickets (or simply can’t). Blame it on TV, Netflix, the 24-hour news cycle or the short-attention span of millennials.

But whatever is going on, it’s leaving great movies on the shelf,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

We Tried It: Shimmering Glitter Lips for New Year’s Eve

  • PEOPLE.com
If there’s any time of the year to experiment with one of beauty’s latest trends – glitter lips – New Year’s Eve is that time. Thanks to celebrity makeup artist Pat McGrath’s lip kits that can barely stay on shelves and celebrities like Chrissy Teigen, Jenna Dewan-Tatum, Shay Mitchell and more looked as glamorous as ever wearing it, I was inspired to test out the look just in time for Nye.

Sadly, McGrath’s Lust 004 kit, which was the one all the stars used to achieve this glimmering red lip, sold out almost instantly. But I dug around,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Den Of Geek films of the year: Sing Street

Simon Brew Dec 28, 2016

In second place in our favourite film of the year 2016 poll? That'd be Sing Street...

Our writers have voted for their favourite films of 2016! And here's what lies in second place...

See related Batman Forever: the case for and against Val Kilmer looks back on Batman Forever Joel Schumacher on Batman Forever, Batman & Robin, nipples Jim Carrey on Batman Forever: Tommy Lee Jones hated me

2. Sing Street

On Friday May 20th, John Carney’s latest film, Sing Street, opened in English, Welsh and Scottish cinemas (following a nine week run in Ireland and Northern Ireland). It did so off the back of a triumphant premiere at the Sundance Film Festival earlier in the year, and with reviews practically screaming from the page and screen about just what a charming, uplifting, wonderful film it was.

Carney, who had previously given the world Once and Begin Again,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Golden Globes’ Surprises & Snubs: Finding Dory Gets Lost, Tom Hanks Isn’t Flying High

  • PEOPLE.com
Golden Globes’ Surprises & Snubs: Finding Dory Gets Lost, Tom Hanks Isn’t Flying High
The 2017 Golden Globe nominations are here, and although a few big names earned awards buzz leading up to the noms, they won’t have a shot at the prestigious award.

A few lesser known films, television shows and actors, however, pulled some unexpected nods (congrats to Sing Street and Aaron Taylor-Johnson!).

Here’s who will have – and who should have had – a chance at a Golden Globe award on Jan. 8.

Films Snub: Denzel Washington

Although the Oscar winner was recognized for his acting in Fences, his directing work for the 1950s-set drama failed to secure him a nomination or a best motion picture drama honor.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Meet 'Oitnb''s Secret Metalhead: Inside Jessica Pimentel's Double Life

Meet 'Oitnb''s Secret Metalhead: Inside Jessica Pimentel's Double Life
It's just after 6 p.m. on a Friday, and Duff's – a noisy heavy-metal bar adorned with autographed memorabilia and jagged-looking instruments in Williamsburg, Brooklyn – has just opened its doors to the sober, work-weary masses. In the center of the room, a woman clad in a black dress and high heels is headbanging atop a carpet adorned with Iron Maiden's corpse-mascot Eddie. The music is "Bleed," an angular, machine-gun–like aural assault that's little over seven minutes long, by Swedish extreme-metal growlers Meshuggah. Bargoers sip their beer in the back,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Golden Globes Open Awards Season Doors to Overlooked Genres

Golden Globes Open Awards Season Doors to Overlooked Genres
Among the unique attributes of the Golden Globes — guests seated at round tables, eating and drinking throughout the show — its category for comedy/musical best picture stands out and offers recognition for films that often don’t make the cut when Oscar nominations are released.

Last year, “Spy” and “Trainwreck” received Globe nominations in the category, but were not nominated for best picture at the Oscars. This year, “Deadpool,” “Bad Moms,” “Love & Friendship,” “Edge of Seventeen,” “Sing Street,” “Florence Foster Jenkins,” “Everybody Wants Some!!,” “Queen of Katwe,” and “The Meddler” are among the films with a shot at Golden Globes attention in the comedy/musical category.

Kate Beckinsale, star of Whit Stillman’s “Love & Friendship,” says in these tumultuous times, there’s more need than ever for a good comedy.

“There’s a relief and lightness and connection and laughing at ourselves as a human race that particularly right now,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

New to Streaming: ‘Hell or High Water,’ ‘Kubo and the Two Strings,’ ‘Dog Eat Dog,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’ve taken it upon ourselves to highlight the titles that have recently hit platforms. Every week, one will be able to see the cream of the crop (or perhaps some simply interesting picks) of streaming titles (new and old) across platforms such as Netflix, iTunes, Amazon, and more (note: U.S. only). Check out our rundown for this week’s selections below.

Dog Eat Dog (Paul Schrader)

Paul Schrader might want to consider expanding his thematic scope a little. Decade after decade, film after film, regardless of whether he’s been writing scripts for others (Martin Scorsese, first and foremost), or sitting in the director’s chair himself, the erstwhile Calvinist has come back to the theme of redemption with obstinate persistence. His protagonists are almost always men, they’re almost
See full article at The Film Stage »

Christmas 2016: our DVD and Blu-ray gift guide

Rob Leane Nov 15, 2016

Which films are coming to disc this festive season? What on Earth do I buy for [insert friend’s name here]? We’ve got the answers...

Christmas comes this time each year, and, purely by coincidence, a lot of DVDs and Blu-rays just so happen to be released at the same sort of time. They fit rather well in stockings, don’t they? How convenient!

See related The Missing series 2: the writers on episode 5’s revelation The Missing series 2 episode 5 review: Das Vergessen The Missing series 2 episode 4 review: Statice The Missing series 2 episode 3 review: A Prison Without Walls

If, like me, you’ve a tendency to give and/or receive a few discs each yuletide, read on for our run-through of all the new goodies coming to home release formats this winter...

Out now Batman: Return Of The Caped Crusaders

One of the surprise treats of this year, Batman: Return Of The Caped Crusaders
See full article at Den of Geek »

Hit Irish Comedy ‘The Young Offenders’ Is A Scrappy, Likeable Crowd Pleaser [BFI London Film Fest Review]

  • The Playlist
Irish cinema is having a bit of a moment. On the one hand, you have the McDonagh brothers, Martin and John Michael, who’ve had big hits at home and abroad with their often violent dark comedies “In Bruges,” “The Guard” and “Calvary.” On another, you have John Carney, whose warm musical comedies “Once” and “Sing Street” have won hearts all over the shop.

Continue reading Hit Irish Comedy ‘The Young Offenders’ Is A Scrappy, Likeable Crowd Pleaser [BFI London Film Fest Review] at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

Shelf Life: John Carney outdoes his own previous best with 'Sing Street'

  • Hitfix
Shelf Life: John Carney outdoes his own previous best with 'Sing Street'
What is Shelf Life? I recently moved into a new apartment, which means I had to box my entire movie collection. Now I’m trying to figure out how much of my physical media actually fits here. Each and every title is now up for grabs, new or old, and it’s time to decide what goes on the shelf and what just plain goes. Title: Sing Street Year: 2016 Director: John Carney Screenwriter: John Carney Format: Blu-ray Purchased Or Sent: Sent What Is It? Conor (Ferdia Walsh-Peelo) is a young man in Dublin in the 1980s, and when he meets a girl worth impressing, the soon-to-be-a-model Raphina (Lucy Boynton), he starts a band with the express purpose of getting her to star in the music video. Random Thoughts: Holy cow, I missed this one. While it had a brief theatrical run, I consider it a major mistake to have missed the press screening.
See full article at Hitfix »

Old Dominion Breaks Down the 20 (Yes, 20!) Songs It Name-Checks in 'Song For Another Time'

  • PEOPLE.com
Old Dominion Breaks Down the 20 (Yes, 20!) Songs It Name-Checks in 'Song For Another Time'
For Old Dominion, their third single - "Song For Another Time" - might just be their most charming, and certainly their most unique, yet. "This song means so much to me and I'm so proud of how it came out," frontman Matt Ramsey tells People of the band's follow-up to their big hits "Break Up with Him" and "Snapback." What makes it so special? The lyrics are actually made up of 20 other song titles - and the song almost didn't make the album. It was written on their tour bus one evening last summer on the Kenny Chesney tour, just
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites