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Pirate Radio (2009)

The Boat That Rocked (original title)
A band of rogue DJs that captivated Britain, playing the music that defined a generation and standing up to a government that wanted classical music, and nothing else, on the airwaves.

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Writer:

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Popularity
3,306 ( 21)

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ON DISC
1 win & 8 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Michael Hadley ...
Mr. Roberts
...
James
...
Mrs. Roberts
...
...
...
Transfer Boatman
...
Will Adamsdale ...
...
...
...
...
...
Ike Hamilton ...
Stephen Moore ...
Prime Minister
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Storyline

"The Boat That Rocked" is an ensemble comedy in which the romance takes place between the young people of the '60s and pop music. It's about a band of rogue DJs that captivated Britain, playing the music that defined a generation and standing up to a government that wanted classical music, and nothing else, on the airwaves. The Count, a big, brash, American god of the airwaves; Quentin, the boss of Radio Rock -- a pirate radio station in the middle of the North Sea that's populated by an eclectic crew of rock and roll DJs; Gavin, the greatest DJ in Britain who has just returned from his drug tour of America to reclaim his rightful position; Dave, an ironic, intelligent and cruelly funny co-broadcaster; and a fearsome British government official out for blood against the drug takers and lawbreakers of a once-great nation. Written by Production office

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

1 Boat. 8 DJs. No Morals. See more »

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Music

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language, and some sexual content including brief nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Country:

| |

Language:

Release Date:

13 November 2009 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Pirate Radio  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$50,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£1,804,773 (United Kingdom), 5 April 2009, Limited Release

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,904,380, 15 November 2009, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$7,994,115, 1 January 2010
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

| | (as dts)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film takes place from 1966 to 1967. See more »

Goofs

When young Karl goes to the broadcast studio to ask Bob about being his Dad, the clock on the wall reads 3:20 (AM) when he arrives. A conversation ensues during which Bob finishes one song, then introduces and starts another as he talks with Karl. But when the scene ends after several minutes, the clock still reads 3:20. See more »

Quotes

Quentin: The day has come. Tonight pirate radio dies. From midnight, we are a ghost ship floating without hope on cold and dark waters. You have done almighty work here. Thank you. But your work is done.
The Count: Not mine, sir. I'm an American citizen and I don't give a hootenanny God damn about your nitpicking limey laws. I intend to broadcast from this ship 24 hours a day until the day I die. And then for a couple days after that.
Gavin Cavanagh: Not wanting to sound rude or anything, but don't you think that might be an ever...
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Crazy Credits

This film is dedicated to all who worked and broadcast on the pirate stations - all those wonderful years, all day and all of the night. See more »

Connections

Referenced in After Hours: Formed a Band (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Wouldn't It Be Nice
(1966)
Music by Brian Wilson (as Brian Douglas Wilson)
Lyrics by Mike Love (as Mike E. Love), Tony Asher
Performed by The Beach Boys
Courtesy of EMI Records Ltd
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
A good-humoured and moving British comedy as a tribute to pop-rock
18 June 2009 | by See all my reviews

If you think of "Four weddings and a Funeral" or "Notting Hill", you will be a little disappointed, being here the overall tone not so brilliant, dialogues not so sparkling, however, the both humorous and moving atmosphere of Richard Curtis's comedies is still recognizable.

I think the real protagonist in "The boat that rocked" is music, that sound pop-rock that in the 60's began to move the world, and to be opposed by the establishment as a dangerous weapon in the hands of the multitudes, as a threat to a well consolidated but no longer valid system. Among unreal situations, a totally-lacking plot, among odd and eccentric characters, what only matters is that power of music to revive one's spirits, to give voice to the most uncontrolled, animal, ancestral instincts of man. And thus becomes, in my opinion, the most vivid scene that of those hundreds of records floating on the water, the symbol of a generation, of an era that was then ready to explode, and that no strict establishment could have wiped away, even once illegal radio stations were shut down.

No revolutionary message is conveyed: it's a good-humoured and at intervals melancholic tribute to a generation who, maybe ingenuously, but deeply, and truly believed in out of time-values, friendship, respect, love, and believed that music was a strong, and powerfully effective means to convey them. Even if you don't belong to that generation, each of us has experienced, one or more times in one's life, the communion of a piece of music with the most sensitive chords of our soul: it's about something emotional, but also physical and that's what the director just wants to celebrate.

If you are fond of music, or simply you have once in your life been moved by a song, you will like this movie, or at least enjoy it for what it is, without the necessity of too much criticism.


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