7.3/10
51,784
117 user 247 critic

Fish Tank (2009)

Not Rated | | Drama | 11 September 2009 (UK)
Trailer
2:04 | Trailer

Watch Now

From $3.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

Everything changes for 15-year-old Mia when her mum brings home a new boyfriend.

Director:

Writer:

Reviews
Popularity
4,688 ( 388)
20 wins & 28 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Red Road (2006)
Drama | Mystery | Thriller
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.8/10 X  

Jackie works as a CCTV operator. Each day she watches over a small part of the world, protecting the people living their lives under her gaze. One day a man appears on her monitor, a man she thought she would never see again, a man she never wanted to see again. Now she has no choice, she is compelled to confront him.

Director: Andrea Arnold
Stars: Kate Dickie, Tony Curran, Martin Compston
Shame (2011)
Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

A man's carefully cultivated private life is disrupted when his sister arrives for an indefinite stay.

Director: Steve McQueen
Stars: Michael Fassbender, Carey Mulligan, James Badge Dale
Adventure | Drama | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

A teenage girl with nothing to lose joins a traveling magazine sales crew, and gets caught up in a whirlwind of hard partying, law bending and young love as she criss-crosses the Midwest with a band of misfits.

Director: Andrea Arnold
Stars: Sasha Lane, Shia LaBeouf, Riley Keough
Wasp (2003)
Short | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Zoë is a single mother who lives with her four children in Dartford. She is poor and can't afford to buy food. One day her ex-boyfriend drives by and asks her to go on a date with him. ... See full summary »

Director: Andrea Arnold
Stars: Natalie Press, Danny Dyer, Jodie Mitchell
Hunger (2008)
Biography | Drama
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

Irish republican Bobby Sands leads the inmates of a Northern Irish prison in a hunger strike.

Director: Steve McQueen
Stars: Stuart Graham, Laine Megaw, Brian Milligan
Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Mia
...
...
Rebecca Griffiths ...
...
Sydney Mary Nash ...
Keira
Carrie-Ann Savill ...
Tyler's Friend
Toyin Ogidi ...
Tyler's Friend
Grant Wild ...
Keeley's Dad
Sarah Bayes ...
Charlotte Collins ...
Tall Dancing Girl
Kirsty Smith ...
Dancing Girl
Chelsea Chase ...
Dancing Girl
Brooke Hobby ...
Dancing Girl
...
Billy's Brother
Edit

Storyline

Mia, an aggressive fifteen-year-old girl, lives on an Essex estate with her tarty mother, Joanne, and precocious little sister Tyler. She has been thrown out of school and is awaiting admission to a referrals unit and spends her days aimlessly. She begins an uneasy friendship with Joanne's slick boyfriend, Connor, who encourages her one interest, dancing. Written by don @ minifie-1

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Live, love and give as good as you get.

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

|

Language:

Release Date:

11 September 2009 (UK)  »

Also Known As:

Akvarij  »

Box Office

Opening Weekend:

£103,180 (UK) (13 September 2009)

Gross:

$373,060 (USA) (9 May 2010)
 »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Katie Jarvis, who plays Mia, had never acted before this film. A casting director spotted her having a fight with her boyfriend at a train station and offered her the role. See more »

Goofs

As Mia is leaving the dance audition, she passes a mirrored wall and the cameraman and his equipment is clearly reflected. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
[Mia calls Keeley using a cellphone]
Keeley: [from an answering machine] Hey, it's Keeley. Leave me a message.
Mia: Keeley, it's me. What's going on? I've left like three messages. I said sorry, didn't I? You know what I'm like. I was pissed off. Ring me back, you bitch.
See more »

Connections

Featured in The EE British Academy Film Awards (2015) See more »

Soundtracks

Get Up Offa That Thing
Performed by James Brown
Written by Deanna Brown / Deidra Jenkins / Yamma Brown
Published by Dynatone Publishing Company (BMI)
All rights administered by Warner/Chappell Music Publishing Ltd.
All rights reserved
Courtesy of Polydor Records (United States)
Under licence from Universal Music Operations Ltd
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A far cry from the age of aquarius.
30 September 2010 | by (Edinburgh.) – See all my reviews

There's a lot of great content here in this movie and it's already been rightly praised in almost all corners but when I started watching Fish Tank I started to get worried. The first 10-15 minutes were very reminiscent of Thirteen for me and I hated Thirteen with my reasoning being thus: I dislike annoying teeny girls in real life so why would I want to spend the duration of a movie stuck with them? Drama is supposed to be "life with the dull bits cut out" and while we can often handle masses of detail and indeed endure movies with unlikeable characters they have to be done in such a way that it doesn't become a chore.

Then Fish Tank changes gear and, throughout the course of the movie, it does so two or three times in ways both surprising and loaded with provocative moments.

The basic story is all about Mia, a tough young teenager who seems not to have ever been given any confidence in the future her path could take and so lashes out at anyone around her while momentarily escaping into the pleasure of dancing by herself in a vacant flat. Her mother is a drunken woman who clearly doesn't want her kids around whenever she has a chance to party and her younger sister is just, well, used to things and acts accordingly. But things look up when the mother brings home a fella (Connor, played brilliantly by Michael Fassbender) who actually treats the girls with a bit of kindness and shows them encouragement, especially encouraging Mia's dancing ability.

The core of the movie focuses on Mia's feelings for Connor. Here is a man who can treat her both as a daughter and as an equal, depending on the circumstances, and this is clearly a first for her. Torn between wanting to reclaim lost moments of childhood and embracing her upcoming adult life, Mia is confused and veers between happiness and resentment. Every little girl wants to be a princess at times, like Rapunzel waiting to be whisked away, but some only end up ironically letting their hair down too far.

Performances across the board are strong, with Michael Fassbender and Harry Treadaway being as good as ever and Katie Jarvis simply brilliant in her first feature role, and the direction by Andrea Arnold (working from her own screenplay) manages to keep things just about bearable even as characters try to ruin their own happiness or the happiness of others. The camera-work and sound are at times intrusive while in other moments keep back a little from events, mixing things up so that we get a chance to breathe as the tribulations of life threaten to stifle certain people caught up in events.

For me, personally, I must say that I didn't like the way certain situations developed but the movie serves as a reminder of life and the range of possibilities contained within each and every human being. And I must add that, despite my disappointment with parts of the movie, the whole thing adds up to something pretty great and I never expected to be quite so tense during a last half hour that I'm sure will have many on the edge of their seats. Powerful stuff.


42 of 52 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Here We Go: Welcome to "The IMDb Show"

Kevin Smith weighs in on Justice League and the future of DC and Marvel, and answers fan questions. Plus, we battle with fans over who played the greatest Batman of all time.

Here we go