6.2/10
17,245
104 user 164 critic

I'm Still Here (2010)

Trailer
1:04 | Trailer

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Documenting Joaquin Phoenix's transition from the acting world to a career as an aspiring rapper.

Director:

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Popularity
4,452 ( 427)
1 win & 3 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Antony Langdon ...
Anton
Carey Perloff ...
Himself - Play Director
Larry McHale ...
Larry McHale
...
Casey Affleck
...
Himself
...
Billy Crystal
...
Danny Glover
...
Himself
...
Herself
Johnny Moreno ...
Victor - Danny DeVito's stand-in (as Johnny Marino)
...
Danny DeVito
...
Jerry
Susan Patricola ...
Susan
...
Patrick
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Storyline

In 2008 while rehearsing for a charity event, actor Joaquin Phoenix, with Casey Affleck's camera watching, tells people he's quitting to pursue a career in rap music. Over the next year, we watch the actor write, rehearse, and perform to an audience. He importunes Sean Combs in hopes he'll produce the record. We see the actor in his home: he parties, smokes, bawls out his two-man entourage, talks philosophy with Affleck, and comments on celebrity. Written by <jhailey@hotmail.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

He's done with Hollywood

Genres:

Comedy | Drama | Music

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for sexual material, graphic nudity, pervasive language, some drug use and crude content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

16 September 2010 (Australia)  »

Also Known As:

I'm Still Here: The Lost Years of Joaquin Phoenix  »

Filming Locations:

 »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$96,658, 12 September 2010, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$408,719, 31 October 2010
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The idea for the film came from Joaquin Phoenix's amazement at the way people believed that reality television shows were unscripted. By claiming to retire from acting, he and his brother-in-law Casey Affleck planned to make a film that "explored celebrity, and explored the relationship between the media and the consumers, and the celebrities themselves". See more »

Goofs

When Phoenix first meets Diddy in the hotel, he knocks on the door on the right side of the hall, then the camera switches and Diddy is opening the door on the left side of the hall. It can't just be a change in camera angle since the door is the last one on the hall. See more »

Quotes

Joaquin Phoenix: Did someone just human shit on me?
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Connections

References Synecdoche, New York (2008) See more »

Soundtracks

Cool Water
Written by Royston Langdon
Performed by Antony Langdon & Joaquin Phoenix
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Will be utterly fascinating...for some.
27 November 2010 | by See all my reviews

This has to be one of the most weird and surreal movies that I've ever seen. Watching Joaquin Phoenix bouncing around like a gibbering idiot and rapping in front of Edward James Olmos (rap name: EJO), while a nonsensical voice-over of Olmos rambles about raindrops and mountains and inner light...it's just insane. And the entire mockumentary is like that, to varying degrees. 

Joaquin plays a deranged, drug-using, prostitute-frequenting, delusional, destructive, bizzaro-version of himself, and I just can't look away. Every time he steps up onto a stage to rap, it's a hilarious train wreck. Even though you can't help but feel painfully embarrassed for the character. The way he berates his assistants, tries to get a friend in recovery to take drugs, constantly surrenders to his own paranoia and delusions, and takes narcissism and selfishness to the furthest excesses, it's all just unbelievably compelling. It's like watching the worst person in the world and wondering what insanity they're going to race towards next.

I thought that the performance by Phoenix was great. This is my absolute favorite movie by him, and my favorite "character" that he's played. It's not by accident that so many people thought this movie was a genuine documentary about Phoenix's spiraling life. He genuinely makes the character seem crazy enough to believe that his music is actually good and that the absurd things that he's saying have meaning. It feels real, even when you know it's not. Every uncomfortable, embarrassed and incredulous reaction of his friends and the people he meets just drew me deeper into the world of this bizarre man.

I was beyond impressed by what Phoenix and Casey Affleck did with this. When I first heard about it, it sounded like a vanity project that would be an amusing oddity, at best. What I got instead was one of the best movies I've seen this year. It is NOT for everyone. But how can I not rate a movie highly that made me laugh so much, while also making me feel sadness, disgust, pity, incredulity, anger, hope, embarrassment, and ten other things? 

This experiment was a smashing success, in my opinion, and something truly unique that I'll be thinking about for a long time. I'm Still Here is audacious, ridiculous, and certainly divisive. I can honestly see why some people would hate this movie, and the entire idea behind it. But, long before that perfect ending left my screen, I knew which side of that divide I would fall on.


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