7.5/10
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Cloud Atlas (2012)

Trailer
2:34 | Trailer

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An exploration of how the actions of individual lives impact one another in the past, present and future, as one soul is shaped from a killer into a hero, and an act of kindness ripples across centuries to inspire a revolution.

Writers:

(novel), (written for the screen by) | 2 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
745 ( 116)
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 16 wins & 75 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
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Storyline

Everything is connected: an 1849 diary of an ocean voyage across the Pacific; letters from a composer to his lover; a thriller about a conspiracy at a nuclear power plant; a farce about a publisher in a nursing home; a rebellious clone in futuristic Korea; and the tale of a tribe living on post-apocalyptic Hawaii far in the future. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Everything Is Connected


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for violence, language, sexuality/nudity and some drug use | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Official Sites:

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Country:

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Language:

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Release Date:

26 October 2012 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Cloud Atlas  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$102,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$9,612,247, 28 October 2012, Wide Release

Gross USA:

$27,108,272, 7 July 2013

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$130,482,868, 7 July 2013
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (Mainland China Cut Version)

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The character played by Amanda Walker is nursing-home resident "Veronica Costello," based on the popular song "Veronica" sung by Elvis Costello and written by Elvis Costello and Sir Paul McCartney. That song tells the story of a similar Veronica. See more »

Goofs

When Zachry is looking for enemies in his family's hut, he is holding the knife upside down. Several seconds afterwards, the knife is facing up. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Zachry: [shivering beside the fire] Oh, lonesome night. And babbits bawling, the wind biting the bone. Wind like this... full of voices. Ancestry howling at you, yibbering stories, all voices tied up into one. One voice differing. One voice, whispering out there, spying from the dark. The fangy devil, Old Georgie hisself. Mm. Now your ear up close, and I'll yarn you about the first time we met, eye to eye.
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Crazy Credits

When a montage is shown of all the characters the actors are playing, the font of the names changes with each time period. See more »


Soundtracks

Chimhyang Moo
Written by Byeong-ki Hwang (as Byungki Hwang)
Performed by Byeong-ki Hwang (as Byungki Hwang)
Taken from the album Chimyang Moo (CNLR0903-2)
Courtesy of C&L Music, Inc.
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Like flipping channels for 3 hours.
22 January 2013 | by See all my reviews

A grandiose production and stellar cast doesn't help this overly ambitious mix come together in a coherent movie. The series of different stories isn't set up well in the beginning so it feels confusing for a while. Then when they sort of come together it isn't clever or convincing. Maybe this story was unfilmable. It just felt like a mix of bad movies shredded and mixed up together. It tries to have a common theme about standing up to oppression of some sort or other via corporate corruption, musical composition, the slave trade, science fiction etc but in the end it wasn't worth the effort.

The white actors acting as Asian and vice versa are distractingly comical although I understand there is a reason for it.

It's easy to see why it wasn't a box office success and didn't receive any major nominations.

Skip it.


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