7.1/10
7,797
29 user 225 critic

Plemya (2014)

Unrated | | Crime, Drama | 11 September 2014 (Ukraine)
A deaf mute boy joins a boarding school for similar children. Confronted by the violent and criminal antics of some of the other boys and girls, he struggles to conform and join the 'tribe'.

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31 wins & 22 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Credited cast:
Hryhoriy Fesenko ...
Sergei (as Grigoriy Fesenko)
Yana Novikova ...
Anya
Rosa Babiy ...
Svetka
Oleksandr Dsiadevych ...
Gera (as Alexander Dsiadevich)
Yaroslav Biletskiy
Ivan Tishko ...
Makar
Oleksandr Osadchyi ...
King (as Alexander Osadchiy)
Oleksandr Sydelnykov ...
Shnyr (as Alexander Sidelnikov)
Oleksandr Panivan ...
Woodwork Teacher (as Alexander Panivan)
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Kyrylo Koshyk ...
Sponsor (as Kyril Koshyk)
Maryna Panivan ...
Nora
Tetyana Radchenko ...
Principal
Liudmyla Rudenko ...
History Teacher (as Lyudmila Rudenko)
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Storyline

A deaf teenager enters a specialized boarding school where, to survive, he becomes part of a wild organization - the tribe. His love for one of the concubines will unwillingly lead him to break all the unwritten rules within the Tribe's hierarchy. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Crime | Drama

Certificate:

Unrated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

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Release Date:

11 September 2014 (Ukraine)  »

Also Known As:

The Tribe  »

Filming Locations:

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Box Office

Opening Weekend:

$11,094 (USA) (19 June 2015)

Gross:

$150,564 (USA) (18 September 2015)
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Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Color:

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

All the actors are deaf and the film makes no use of any vocal language nor even subtitles, only sign language throughout. This may quite well be a first for a feature film of fiction. See more »

Connections

Featured in See Hear: Film Casting & Portrayal (2015) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Brutal but incredible filmmaking
5 October 2014 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

At the time of writing (October 2014) this is on release in France but not the UK or the US so I'll write this for the benefit of audiences elsewhere in the world who might be wondering whether to go and see it or not. When not extorting money from other students at a boarding school for the deaf in the Ukraine, the 'tribe' of thugs in the title spend their time robbing train passengers, people in the street or, with the help of their teachers, pimp each other at a truck stop. New kid Sergey arrives and falls for one of the young hookers...which is about all the synopsis you need. There's no dialogue, or subtitles, all the communication between the characters is through sign language. Along with a total absence of incidental music this has the paradoxical effect of heightening the sound...the sounds of footsteps, lorry engines revving for example becoming sinisterly effective. It's not difficult to follow the narrative at all, so don't be put off. The bleak surroundings of the institution combine with a dreary landscape of crumbling apartment blocks, supermarkets at night time in a bitter, dirty grey winter, to heighten the feeling of an amoral universe, a dog eat dog world where everyone is out only for themselves. There's no compassion, the one intimate relationship which develops seems to be motivated by lust, carnality and characterised by opportunism on either part. There doesn't appear to be any real tenderness there. Is the closed institution an allegory for the Ukraine, or human societies as a whole? The Tribe is a unique piece of cinema and inspired me to write, I've seen nothing in the last few years quite so extraordinary, but be warned it most definitely is not for the faint hearted. The violence is sickening, stomach churning, and made all the more shocking by the use of sound and absence of music since even if averting your gaze you remain all too aware of what's happening on screen, with no music to distance or make things ironic. The Tribe forces you to gaze, unblinking, into the abyss of total human depravity.


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