Join us for a rousing celebration of the life and work of one of Broadway's greatest legends - the one and only Stephen Sondheim.

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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
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Himself - Host
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Himself - Conductor
New York Philharmonic ...
Themselves
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Herself - Performer
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Himself - Performer
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Herself - Performer
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Herself - Performer
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Himself - Performer
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Herself - Performer
Nathan Gunn ...
Himself - Performer
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Himself - Performer
Blaine Hoven ...
Himself - Performer
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Herself - Performer
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Himself - Performer
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Herself - Performer
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Join us for a rousing celebration of the life and work of one of Broadway's greatest legends - the one and only Stephen Sondheim.

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Not Rated
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Release Date:

16 November 2010 (USA)  »

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1.78 : 1
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Quotes

Paul Gemignani - Conductor: [Gemignani leads the orchestra in the opening chords of "The Ballad of Sweeney Todd when Pierce comes on stage and interrupts him] What?
David Hyde Pierce - Host: We're not going to start with Sweeney Todd.
Paul Gemignani - Conductor: Oh, come on, David, it's my favorite!
David Hyde Pierce - Host: I know it's your favorite. We talked about this. This is a birthday party.
Paul Gemignani - Conductor: Oh, man...
David Hyde Pierce - Host: We're going to eat cake, not people.
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Soundtracks

Losing My Mind
Written by Stephen Sondheim
Performed by Marin Mazzie
[from "Follies"]
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User Reviews

 
Stereophonic sound made me feel like I was there!
13 October 2016 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

A fantastic overture introduces all of those wonderful Broadway performers there to honor Stephen Sondheim on the occasion of his 80th birthday. It seemed that practically every season, Sondheim was represented on the New York City in one way or another, whether it was in a concert of his sings or a revival of one of his classics. Between two productions of "Company", "Follies", "Gypsy", "Sweeney Todd" and "Into the Woods", single revivals of "West Side Story", "Anyone Can Whistle", "Do I Hear a Waltz?", "A Little Night Music", "Pacific Overtures", "Merrilly We Roll Along", "Sunday in the Music", "Sunday in the Park With George", "Passion", " The Frogs" and "Road Show" have all been seen in one way or another in New York. Oh, and all over the country....over and over and over, to the pleasure of many.

There have been many variations of compilation concerts over the years, and although I saw two of them just in the past 10 years, this one I had to settle for on PBS. I was not disappointed, because every one of his shows are represented, plus a few surprises as well. Obscure songs, many standards, and a real party atmosphere to kick things off. Some people complain that Sondheim songs aren't often singable, but for somebody who prefers to listen, that's where the challenge comes in. I like the opportunity to think when I'm at the theater, whether it's a musical play or an Albee or Pinter drama.

The stars, here, are phenomenal, and all you have to do us give a first or last name, their faces come into your mind, the song they are most identified with, and the history of modern musical theater passes through your memory. LuPone, Stritch, Bernadette, Marin, Murphy, Audra. You get the idea. I can never hear enough of "Follies", and even a flop like "Do I Hear a Waltz?" has been added to my list of favorites. I love the similarities between "We're Going to be alright" from "DIHAW" and "Love Will See Us Through" from "Follies", thrilled the first had the original lyrics that were deemed too "controversial" for 1965.

Now with the 86 year old legend preparing for another show, I long to hear what's in the mind of a man who constantly seems open to refresh his shows for changing times. The themes remain the same, simply because they ARE universal AND timeless. I would be thrilled even with a symphony of his instrumental interludes, such as the openings for "Follies" and "A Little Night Music", because he twists the music in ways that no other composer could dream of that are a surprising delight to the ear. Sadly, we've lost two of the performers here, the regal John McMartin and the unsurpassable Elaine Stritch. So many legends in a span of two hours makes for a marvelous party.


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