6.7/10
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The Lady in the Van (2015)

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A man forms an unexpected bond with a transient woman living in her van that's parked in his driveway.

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(screenplay), (memoir)
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 1 win & 5 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Underwood
Clare Hammond ...
George Fenton ...
Conductor
BBC Concert Orchestra ...
The British Symphony Orchestra
...
Jamie Parker ...
Estate Agent
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Pauline
...
Rufus
Richard Griffiths ...
Sam Perry
Pandora Colin ...
Fiona Perry
...
Giles Perry
...
Actor
Giles Cooper ...
Passer by
Tom Klenerman ...
Tom Perry
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Storyline

The Lady in the Van tells the true story of Alan Bennett's strained friendship with Miss Mary Shepherd, an eccentric homeless woman whom Bennett befriended in the 1970s before allowing her temporarily to park her Bedford van in the driveway of his Camden home. She stayed there for 15 years. As the story develops Bennett learns that Miss Shepherd is really Margaret Fairchild (died 1989), a former gifted pupil of the pianist Alfred Cortot. She had played Chopin in a promenade concert, tried to become a nun, was committed to an institution by her brother, escaped, had an accident when her van was hit by a motorcyclist for which she believed herself to blame, and thereafter lived in fear of arrest.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A mostly true story


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG - 13 for a brief unsettling image | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

26 February 2016 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dama iz dvorišta  »

Box Office

Budget:

$6,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£2,256,121 (UK) (15 November 2015)

Gross:

$10,017,675 (USA) (5 June 2016)
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Company Credits

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Did You Know?

Trivia

At one point Alan Bennett says he'd rather write about spies than about Miss Shepherd. This is a reference to his plays 'The Old Country' (staged 1977), An Englishman Abroad (1983) and Screen One: A Question of Attribution (1991), all of which are about real or fictitious Britons who spied for the Soviets. See more »

Goofs

There are a couple of historical mistakes which the filmmakers perhaps missed, and which show the hazard of filming in today's environment. In one of the early street scenes, circa 1974, Miss Shepherd is seen walking away from a crossroads. The traffic signals shown there are a modern design, not introduced until 1997. In another scene where she is seen with Alan Bennett near the gates of the convent, the block of flats in the background have modern double-glazing. In the 1970s, this would either have been single-glazed with wood frames or light aluminium. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Alan Bennett: [typing] The smell is sweet, with urine only a minor component, the prevalent odor suggesting the inside of someone's ear. Dank clothes are there, too, wet wool and onions, which she eats raw. Plus, what for me has always been the essence of poverty, damp newspaper. Miss Shepherd's multi-flavored aroma is masked by a liberal application of various talcum powders, with Yardley's Lavender always a favorite. And currently it is this genteel fragrance that dominates the second subject, ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

During the first part of the credits, a young Margaret can be seen playing the piano at her concert in King's Hall. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Lady in the Van: Deleted Scenes (2016) See more »

Soundtracks

Liberty of Action
Written by Herman Langschwert and Wolfgang Killian
Performed by Herman Langschwert and Wolfgang Killian
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User Reviews

 
Dame Maggie as another cranky old bird
20 November 2015 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

At the bottom of the poster it says: 'This is a mostly true story.' Nicholas Hytner directs a 'revisionist' take on Miss Shepherd, the tramp-like old biddy who parked her van in Alan Bennett's front drive for a few weeks that turned into 15 years. The movie version fleshes out her story with glimpses of her past (a convent, a piano recital, a family feud, a fatal accident) which the narrator (one of the two Alan Bennetts played by Alex Jennings) tells us he only found out after she died.

A woman in front of me whispered to her companion, who wondered why Alan Bennett had a twin, that he actually had a split personality. That's not a bad explanation for the device of the householder Alan who puts up with Miss Shepherd (and clears her mess from his drive) and the writer Alan who doesn't think there's a story in this. I'm not sure that the double-act is entirely effective or necessary: a voice-over from the real Alan would have worked just as well, wouldn't it?

Despite the attempts to give the Lady a life before the Van, the screenplay is more revealing about the playwright, the reluctant Samaritan who is also having to deal with his northern mother's journey down the road to dementia. There are even a few references to the fact that Mr Bennett's sexuality was being questioned for many years before he finally outed himself.

The movie has more pace than the book and the play did. Maggie Smith is of course simply magnificent, fully absorbed into the grimy skin of this unlovable old harridan. Her performance is pitched midway between the Duchess of Downton and Muriel from the Marigold Hotel, although the character preposterously blends Hyacinth Bucket with Victor Meldrew. The 'History Boys', who largely owe their careers to Mr Bennett, pop up in a series of cameos, along with Frances de la Tour and Stephen Campbell-Moore from the same play. Jim Broadbent's scrounger is the least convincing presence and is perhaps mostly untrue.

This looks like being another highly competitive year for Oscars and BAFTAs, but Dame Maggie is certain to be a contender and could well be a winner. THE LADY IN THE VAN is not pitch-perfect in the way that THE HISTORY BOYS was (and the first - best - MARIGOLD HOTEL), but it is another master-class exemplar of British writing, acting and film- making.


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