6.7/10
18,649
86 user 155 critic

The Lady in the Van (2015)

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A man forms an unexpected bond with a transient woman living in her van that's parked in his driveway.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (memoir)
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Popularity
4,043 ( 553)
Nominated for 1 Golden Globe. Another 1 win & 5 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Underwood
Clare Hammond ...
Young Margaret Fairchild
George Fenton ...
Conductor
BBC Concert Orchestra ...
The British Symphony Orchestra
...
Jamie Parker ...
Estate Agent
...
...
Richard Griffiths ...
Sam Perry
Pandora Colin ...
...
Giles Perry
...
Actor
Giles Cooper ...
Passer by
Tom Klenerman ...
Tom Perry
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Storyline

The Lady in the Van tells the true story of Alan Bennett's strained friendship with Miss Mary Shepherd, an eccentric homeless woman whom Bennett befriended in the 1970s before allowing her temporarily to park her Bedford van in the driveway of his Camden home. She stayed there for 15 years. As the story develops Bennett learns that Miss Shepherd is really Margaret Fairchild (died 1989), a former gifted pupil of the pianist Alfred Cortot. She had played Chopin in a promenade concert, tried to become a nun, was committed to an institution by her brother, escaped, had an accident when her van was hit by a motorcyclist for which she believed herself to blame, and thereafter lived in fear of arrest.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

A mostly true story


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG - 13 for a brief unsettling image | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

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Release Date:

26 February 2016 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Dama iz dvorišta  »

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Box Office

Budget:

$6,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend:

£2,256,121 (United Kingdom), 15 November 2015, Limited Release

Opening Weekend USA:

$175,280, 22 January 2016, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$10,017,675, 5 June 2016
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

,  »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was shot in the actual house on the actual street where the events took place, Gloucester Crescent in Camden Town. Some of the same people still lived there when the star prop arrived, decades later. See more »

Goofs

There is a cable TV box on the outside of Bennett's House, there was no cable TV - certainly not in 1973. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Alan Bennett: [typing] The smell is sweet, with urine only a minor component, the prevalent odor suggesting the inside of someone's ear. Dank clothes are there, too, wet wool and onions, which she eats raw. Plus, what for me has always been the essence of poverty, damp newspaper. Miss Shepherd's multi-flavored aroma is masked by a liberal application of various talcum powders, with Yardley's Lavender always a favorite. And currently it is this genteel fragrance that dominates the second subject, ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

During the first part of the credits, a young Margaret can be seen playing the piano at her concert in King's Hall. See more »

Connections

References The Song of Bernadette (1943) See more »

Soundtracks

Pretty Please
Written by Leon and Levi Triplett
Performed by The Triplett Twins
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User Reviews

 
A Perfect Little Movie
24 December 2015 | by See all my reviews

The best thing Maggie Smith did for The Lady in the Van was not giving a brilliant acting performance, but agreeing to reprise her stage role as The Lady. Without that, this movie would not have been made.

This is a near-perfect "small" movie, but unlike many such films, this one is neither slow nor boring. The film begins with the sounds of a terrible car crash, and within ten minutes, we have several mysteries to chew on: Who is "the lady" really; why can't she tolerate listening to music; what happened in that car crash? These mysteries keep us engaged while playwright Alan Bennett tells us a story that at its core is more about the relationship between Bennett - or rather Bennett's two selves, the one who writes and the one who lives life - and the lady living in his driveway.

In choosing to portray himself as two characters – also a feature of his play – Bennett has chosen a device that could have been a disaster but in the rendering comes off brilliantly, especially near the end of this highly engaging film. I don't want to give anything away about that, so just watch it for yourself and enjoy.


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