Get Out (2017) Poster

(I) (2017)

User Reviews

Add a Review
733 ReviewsOrdered By: Helpfulness
8/10
Jordan Peele debuts in style
totalwonder23 September 2017
Get Out provided me with something I long for. The debut of a new filmmaker that makes you look hopefully into the future. Jordan Peele has done just that. He wrote and directed this smart, elegant film and even made us find a new way to classify it. Horror, comedy, drama, social satire. What matters really is that it's a first of sorts and then some. It introduced me also to a major talent in front of the camera. Daniel Kaluuya is sheer perfection. As an actor he projects and provokes empathy. Whatever your race or races you will be in his shoes, feeling what he's feeling. I was him, throughout. The gasps of fear mixed with the bursts of laughter from the audience - me included - made Get Out one of the most rewarding film experiences of 2017. Kudos also to Bradley Whitford and the phenomenal Catherine Keener. They are terrifyingly recognizable and what about Caleb Landry Jones? Menacing enough and comic enough - he reminded me of Peter, Chris Elliott's character in Everybody Loves Raymond - to be all the things he needed to be. Perfect. As is the human relief provided by the wonderful Marcus Henderson. As you may gather I'm celebrating. So, Mr Peele, thank you very much.
74 out of 99 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? | Report this
8/10
Just because you're invited, doesn't mean you're welcome.
"Get Out" takes the initial premise of "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner" and then twists it with "The Stepford Wives" to create a compelling, thoughtful critique of white power. Peele, of course, isn't arguing that white people are out to hypnotise black people. Instead, Get Out is a stinging criticism of the white liberalism that carries itself as empathetic towards blacks, but that empathy only extends as far as white control. Peele isn't taking aim at Neo- Nazis and other whites who would angrily shout the n-word. They're a lost cause. Instead, he's looking at those who profess their lack of racism, but only do so if they can maintain their dominance over black people in the most insidious manner possible. As Chris pointedly notes to Rose at party full of white people, "Has anyone here ever met a black person that didn't work for them?"

The film is genuinely creepy. Instead of cheesy music and grotesque torture porn, Peele relies on the unknown to draw you in. What is happening here? The plot builds like a slow boil to a terror explosion. Clues to the outcome are evident from the first second, but it takes the entire run-time to pull everything together. It's such a joy to be surprised by a horror outcome. I don't think I've seen a genre film this inventive since Cabin in the Woods. The resolve is truly satisfying.

My favourite aspect of Get Out is the intelligence of the characters. There's a lot to like, but beyond the deeper themes; the characters aren't morons. I cringe every time I watch a genre film and the characters don't behave logically. Chris and Rose are not fools. Something is amiss, enough to warrant wariness. Anyone in this situation would be unnerved as events play out. Credit again to Peele for writing characters that act rationally.

"Get Out" doesn't replace the scares with humour – Peele is too smart to do that. Instead, he balances the fear with laughs and then laces everything with social comment and that unsettling tone. The fact that Chris is so eminently likable just underlines it. It all adds up to something of a treat – for everybody, not just horror fans.
299 out of 455 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? | Report this
9/10
An Intense Funny Dark Horror Movie
Malthe Tuxen18 July 2017
Warning: Spoilers
I wanna start by saying this is probably the only horror film I can think of where the comedy didn't ruin the movie, but actually made it better. Shaun of the dead is pretty good, but every other comedy/horror movie I have seen, SUCKED. I usually say that horror and comedy should never be put together, mostly because the mixing ruins two genres that are mostly great on their own. But Get Out did a brilliant job mixing comedy and horror in a way that I have never quite seen before.

This movie actually both scared me and made me laugh and I didn't come out hating the movie. It is a very different movie, also a very political movie, at least I think so. I really thought this movie was going to be terrible after watching the trailer, but now I am really happy I have seen it. I am not really a horror movie fan, but the thing I think this movie did so well was not to depend on hardcore violence, quick camera movement, shock, effects, and nothing that make the bad horror movies bad. I have personally seen more bad horror movies than good, which is why I usually stay away from them.

The thing I love about Get Out is that it is scary in a truly psychological sense that not many horror movies still use. And it does it brilliantly, one second you will be laughing, the next you will be scared out of your mind. The way it does it is brilliant because every bad guy is very nice, good looking, political correct, and that makes it even more creepy. I am so grateful I can finally point to a good modern day horror movie. But again, this movie was great, and I think it sends a message that most do not want to hear, but people need to hear. The racists there are most of now doesn't go around beating up black people or anything of the kind, they mostly do not know they are racist. People who are racist but knows it is wrong, so every time there is a black joke he will go insane just to prove he is not racist, people who wouldn't care if they voted for Barack Obama or Ben Carson as long as they can say they voted for a black person. People who constantly have to remind themselves they are not racist because they voted for Obama, or they are not homophobic because they have a gay friend. The racists that make sure no one speaks in a way that they find uncomfortable, the racist that will say you are racist if you say Mexican instead of Latino American. The racist that will say it is wrong to have your kid dress up as an Indian for Halloween.

That is the message I think this movie is trying to Get Out. Just so you know this is just my opinion of what the movie is saying. If you really want to know it's message, you will just have to watch the movie, to get your own opinion. Anyway this is definitely one of 2017 best movies, and I would recommend to everyone. I hope you found this review helpful and I hope you will love the movie as much as I do.
49 out of 70 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? | Report this
8/10
A horror comedy without jokes
Paraszi22 September 2017
the newest film made by jordan peele lives out to the hype that it made.horror comedy is one of the hardest genres(or sub genres) to make a movie about.some good examples would be evil dead 2 and scream.the film actually takes a subject like racism and makes it into a parody of itself.the comedy of the movie is actually really subtle and your'e not gonna walk into the movie and start laughing as a joke comes along.its a realization that can be made while watching the film or after you watched it.it can't be really called a satire of horror movies because it uses the horror movie clichés more than once but the good part is that i doesn't annoy you like a lot of horror movies do.one of the strengths of the movie is that you don't need to be an American to understand the story.a basic knowledge about racism will be enough.but for the clues and metaphors that are in the movie you need to pay more attention and know a little bit more.there are no jokes in the movie and even the comedy relief character lil rel howery doesn't make jokes but sells its comedy by his performance which makes him actually funny and not just an annoying side character like we see mostly in the movies right now.the performances are great and the character choices are rational and logical unlike most horror movies we see today.allison williams does a pretty good job and actually nails the character far more better than i expected.the cinematography is pretty good but it got distracting in two or three places of the movie but it wasn't boring and actually kept the movie pretty good looking.the twists of the movie will actually kinda predictable but that wasn't what the movie was about and i didn't expected to be shocked since the movie doesn't take itself to seriously but serious enough to keep the plot going.the CGI blood were kinda distracting and the movie got slow in a few places but it had the pay-off and you were rewarded after the scenes.the movie is well made and deserves a second viewing in some time and i would recommend it to horror fans or if your'e a fan of subtle humor and comedy.
47 out of 68 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? | Report this
9/10
Best debut from a first time director in years
dre64-212 May 2017
Let's clear the air about this film. It's not a horror film. It's not a comedy. What it is, is a suspenseful thriller of the highest level, worthy to be compared to Hitchcock caliber. The humor is there, along with a few horror scenes, but not enough to overshadow the main theme of the story. The film hits all cylinders with almost no misfires. As far as complaints that the film is racist, it is not. It would work just as well with an all-black or all-white cast. Those complaints are from people who are uncomfortable with black people or interracial relationships and are letting it distract them from the narrative of the film. I most certainly hope that it reaches the wider audience that it so richly deserves.
170 out of 275 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? | Report this
9/10
Lives up to the hype
ramair3506 March 2017
I decided to see this film at the theater after hearing some of the hype (which was basically that it is an excellent horror film that is told from the perspective of a black man).

Well, I can see this would be truly the worst nightmare of a black man (and really the worst nightmare for us all). This is NOT a film that tries to make the viewer feel "sorry" for black people, nor is it at all preachy, but it is just a good old fashioned horror film with a fresh new setting. I'm an old white guy by the way.

The acting is wonderful, and directing is amazing. The film, while mostly horror, is actually completely hilarious in some parts, making it the funniest AND scariest movie I have seen in ages (no easy feat). It is a shame that the film will likely not be regarded in the company of Academy Award potential nominees, because the directing and acting is honestly Oscar worthy. Again, no small feat for a horror movie that is also funny.

In summary, this is a MUST SEE at the theater and one of the best films of the year. It is a fun ride that is very well done!
295 out of 495 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? | Report this
10/10
A deliciously wry slice of cinematic paranoia served with a side of cathartic humor
greenmemo25 February 2017
I was totally blown away by "Get Out". This is one of the best turns by an actor behind the camera I have ever seen (Jordan Peele). Probably the timely social commentary is going to loom heavily when discussing the film; however this shouldn't conceal the fact that this is a masterclass cinematic work that has been thought out to the very last detail; it knows what it wants to say and how to say it, balancing wildly contrasting tones and defeating potential clichés with stylistic bravura. Of course everything stems from a rock solid script, where the plot points are cunningly engineered, and then fleshed out in a disciplined and take no prisoners kind of way. There is much to admire and enjoy here, including some surreal imagery that is as stunning as it is disturbing, always serving a purpose within the narrative; there are also brilliant soundtrack choices and you get subtle nods at the masters that came before (Kubrick and Wes Craven, specially). The plot involves one of those frequently visited "fish out of the water" type of settings where it's up to the director to make the most out of it. Which fortunately is the case here, since you get plenty of real character development and a tight, innuendo ridden dialogue that really gets under your skin. All this, together with the inspired camera work, contributes to the success of this tricky enterprise as a whole. Kudos to all the actors for going all the way with the provocative premise, considering that it could have totally backfired in less confident hands. Everything amounts to a deliciously wry slice of cinematic paranoia served with a side of cathartic humor that appropriately reflects the political times we are living in. And make no mistake, this is a true horror film that refuses to pull any punches; if you thought that Peele was just going for the laughs and the cheap scares you will get more than you bargained for. "Get out" will shock you silly and will make you think. Then you will want to watch it again and try to figure out how he pulled the trick.
328 out of 577 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? | Report this
9/10
A rare triple-threat genre film
Movie_Muse_Reviews12 May 2017
Horror tension, mystery tension and racial tension blend together into a gripping and formidable nail-biter in "Get Out," the astonishing directorial debut of Jordan Peele. The former half of the comedy duo "Key & Peele" has found a way to both honor and subvert the thriller and horror genres in a way that's unmistakably modern.

In the tradition of "The Stepford Wives" with the twist of "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?," the story follows a young black man named Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) who goes to meet his girlfriend, Rose's (Allison Williams) parents at their fancy estate where things go from slightly uncomfortable in terms of Chris being black to deeply messed up in one slow but inevitable fell swoop.

With a creepy opening scene showing a different black man getting abducted in a peaceful-seeming suburb, the tone is set immediately that there's cause for concern. Luckily for Chris, Rose is really sensitive to issues of race and prejudice, and even when her parents (Bradley Whitford and Catherine Keener) or brother (Caleb Landry Jones) seem to make Chris' blackness into a thing, the two handle it as best as any interracial couple could. The warning signs come in the form of the Armitage family's black help, maid Georgina (Betty Gabriel) and groundskeeper Walter (Marcus Henderson), whose behavior is anything but normal.

Peele sets a tone of creepiness largely with the help of composer Michael Abels, also making his feature film debut. The unpredictable nature of Georgina and Walter as characters, the ever-increasing suspicion of all the white characters and the way Peele keeps you nervous about who or what is just outside the frame fuel the fear and paranoia as well as if not better than any horror movie featuring more overtly malevolent forces does.

Kaluuya, in a role that will deservedly put him on the map, gives a performance that will connect with viewers who identify with Chris as a man trying to feel comfortable while out of his element experiencing strange things, and those who truly understand Chris' experience as a man of color undergoing the very same events. It would be fascinating to know the different ways a black viewer would experience the film compared to a white one, but the most important thing is that everyone will identify with and feel for Chris.

When a little horror film debut like this one gets talents such as Whitford, Keener and Williams, you know the script is good. Peele keeps up the air of mystery a long time even without packing in very many unexpected twists. The awareness of something being wrong but not quite understanding what it going on or why despite getting new information is a real strength of Peele's writing. Then of course there's the brilliant ways that race and the black experience make it into the film. If that weren't enough, Chris' best friend (LilRel Howry) provides comic relief in a way that's stereotypical, yet Peele uses him in unexpected ways. So we get to benefit from Peele's nose for comedy as well.

Not everything adds up by the end of "Get Out," but the film plays out in extremely satisfying fashion. Fans of horror and fans of thrillers who don't mind horror when it's done well should both enjoy the technique and experience. It provides thrills of the pulse-pounding, thrill-seeking and thought-provoking variety and few genre films can say the same.

~Steven C

Thanks for reading! Visit Movie Muse Reviews for more
79 out of 132 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? | Report this
5/10
I Don't Get The Hype
Brew_Swayne10 March 2017
Warning: Spoilers
Cookie cutter suspense/thriller/horror flick that isn't very suspenseful or thrilling or scary. The only real change from the norm with this movie is that it features a black man as the lead actor, and early on in the movie it touches on some of the problems of interracial dating from a black man's perspective. I found some humor in the way that the white family (and later their white friends) interacted with the lead character...going out of their way at times to either talk about how they voted for Obama or loved Tiger Woods...basically doing and saying the things that white people say to black people in an attempt to prove they aren't racist.

The movie was fairly well acted despite not having exceptionally strong material to work with. I thought Daniel Kaluuya turned in a really strong performance and he really saved the movie, imo. I don't recall seeing him in anything else prior to this, but he gave an excellent performance and I hope this serves as a spring board to bigger/better roles. Seems very talented.

My biggest problem with this movie is that I don't know what it was trying to be. It kind of hit a little bit with the satire and humor elements, but all in all, the movie just doesn't really have an identity. The "mystery" behind everything was not well concealed and the twists and turns you'd expect from a movie like this just never developed. I had this movie pretty well figured out before the halfway mark, which made for a less enjoyable second half of the movie. I'm pretty amazed by all the rave reviews it's getting.

It is a bit groundbreaking in it's own right strictly for the cultural/social/racial aspect - as that has been largely neglected in movies, especially this genre - but once you get passed that and just look at the movie for what it is, I can't really give this movie anything more than a middling grade. Not the worst movie I've ever seen by any means, but also not really worth the price of admission either. Wait for it to come out on Netflix and enjoy from the comfort of your own couch.
259 out of 485 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? | Report this
1/10
Paranoid and Manipulative... and Those are its Better Qualities
John Taylor15 May 2017
Warning: Spoilers
I felt little more than pity for Peele after watching this movie. His sad fantasy view of white people and their motives towards black people reveals a disturbed and paranoid world view.

In some of his comedic work, he seems to be mocking this kind of paranoia, but in Get Out he's embraced it as justified. Maybe I was just giving him too much credit before (I'm thinking of his skit with white zombies that won't eat black people).

If a white author wrote a similar story, projecting his paranoid visions of black stereotypes onto fictional black characters (who, of course, are mere puppets and who have no actual control over their actions), he would be reviled and the picture canned or banned.

However, our modern double standard allows Peele to get away with. In fact, he's apparently now celebrated for it.

In addition to the above, it's just generally not an interesting story. It's highly rated, and I was looking forward to a good horror film, but it's not.

If you're a minority who wants validation for your paranoia, or a white person who wants to wallow in white guilt, you might get something out of it. If not, then no.
94 out of 172 found this helpful. Was this review helpful? | Report this
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Awards | FAQ | User Ratings | External Reviews | Metacritic Reviews