A happily married woman has a daughter, and is already six months pregnant when she has doubts if she really wants another child, as this might effect her career too much, and wonder if she should choose the option of a late-term abortion.

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(screenplay), (screenplay)
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3 wins & 9 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Bjarne Mädel ...
Markus
...
Beate
Emilia Pieske ...
Nele
...
Kati
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Mila Bruk ...
Svea
Barbara Focke ...
Inge
Julia Golembiowski ...
Nurse
...
Pauls Freundin
...
Car Driver
Christian Müller ...
Policeman
Karina Plachetka ...
Isa
Martin Reik ...
Paul
Sabine Wolf ...
Katja
Wolfgang Zarnack ...
Young Man
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Storyline

Centered on the dilemma faced by a woman who is already six months pregnant when she learns that her unborn child will have Down's syndrome as well as a serious heart defect. Should she be able to choose the option of a late-term abortion? How can she and her husband know whether the unborn child could have a life worth living or would only suffer? In the end, the expectant mother realizes that only she can make this decision.

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Genres:

Drama

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Release Date:

22 September 2016 (Germany)  »

Also Known As:

24 Weeks  »

Filming Locations:

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Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
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Trivia

This is director Anne Zohra Berrached's graduation film. She studied directing at the Film Academy Baden-Württemberg in Ludwigsburg. See more »

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User Reviews

Looks interesting.
24 February 2016 | by (Adelaide, Australia) – See all my reviews

James Woodall wrote: "Julia Jentsch, another on-screen and on-stage favourite in Germany, is a celebrity stand-up comedian who finds out, some 20 weeks in, that her second child will have Down's syndrome and holes in his heart. Bluntly, to abort or not to abort is the dilemma at the film's heart — and this might touch, though not overtly, on historical memory of Nazi policy towards the handicapped. That is not what the film is about, but, giving nothing away, it grips like nothing else I've seen in German cinema in the past decade. Tough, searing stuff indeed." ('What is a serious film festival doing opening with Hail, Caesar!', The Spectator, 20/2/16).


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