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Kristen Stewart and Lupita Nyong’o Eyed For ‘Charlie’s Angels’ Reboot

29 September 2017 10:05 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Kristen Stewart is being floated for Sony’s “Charlie’s Angels” reboot, reports Variety. Actress and “Pitch Perfect 2” director Elizabeth Banks is signed on to direct. The studio is also floating Oscar-winner Lupita Nyong’o to be part of the ass-kicking trio of private detectives.

If Stewart does sign on, it would be the actress’ first studio film since 2012’s “Snow White and the Huntsman.” The “Twilight” star has wracked up an impressive roster of highly acclaimed indie films in recent years, including Olivier Assayas’ “Clouds of Sils Maria” and “Personal Shopper,” Kelly Reichardt’s “Certain Women,” and Woody Allen’s “Cafe Society.”

Read More:Kristen Stewart Explains Why She Didn’t Cast Herself in Her Short Directorial Debut, ‘Come Swim

Since her Oscar-winning breakout in Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave,” Nyong’o has filmed multiple “Star Wars” movies, as well as Jon Favreau’s “The Jungle Book. »

- Jude Dry

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Kristen Stewart Explains Why She Didn’t Cast Herself in Her Short Directorial Debut, ‘Come Swim’

31 August 2017 8:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Kristen Stewart’s second act isn’t just in the works, it’s here. The long-time actress — at age 27, she’s already been acting professionally for more than half her life — initially dreamed of being a filmmaker, a desire she’s lately been putting into practice through short-form directorial opportunities, including a Chvrches music video and her directorial film debut, the short “Come Swim.” The film bowed earlier this year at Sundance, before going on to screen at Cannes and, most recently, a slot as part of Sundance’s traveling Short Film Tour.

Produced as part of Refinery29’s Shatterbox Anthology — a collection of short films all made by women, and of every stripe, from well-known names like Stewart to rising stars like Courtney Hoffman — the film’s short synopsis bills it as “a diptych of one man’s day; half impressionist and half realist portraits.” Part dreamy (and often unnerving) fable, »

- Kate Erbland

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'2017 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour': Film Review

16 June 2017 3:44 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

Kristen Stewart's directing debut may be the biggest draw in this year's touring package of Sundance-alum short films. But as usual with these anthologies, the real stars are sometimes filmmakers you didn't know you came to see. A varied program ranging from naughty animation to a viral-video gem, the presentation likely contains an Oscar contender or two; supporters of shorts-in-cinemas efforts will be happy to have bought a ticket.

Stewart's Come Swim is by a wide margin the most self-consciously arty entry here, an expressionistic collage full of drowning imagery and whispered voiceover conversations. Is it a dream? A pre-death »

- John DeFore

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Sundance’s Pocket-Sized London Fest Lacks Women Directors But Screens Solid Female-Led Films

6 June 2017 2:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Director Marianna Palka’s “Bitch” screened at Sundance: London: Palka’s Instagram account

The fifth edition of Sundance: London came to a close this weekend. The festival, which cherry-picks a handful of films screened at its American parent festival each year to show across the pond, presented a program of 14 feature-length movies, 15 shorts, and various panel discussions over four days in collaboration with Picturehouse Cinemas.

Of the 14 features shown — which included both fiction and documentary selections — only one had a female director, but the pocket-sized fest still managed to pack in a fair amount of women-centric programming. Alongside Marianna Palka’s surreal feminist satire “Bitch,” which she directed, wrote, and starred in, there were also standout performances to enjoy from Jessica Williams (“The Daily Show”), who lives up to her character’s billing in “The Incredible Jessica James,” and veteran screen actress Lois Smith (“Please Give”) who plays the title character in the speculative sci-fi film “Marjorie Prime.” Meanwhile, on the documentary side of things, Sundance’s U.S. doc grand jury prize winner “Dina” also screened. The film stars its eponymous subject, a woman on the autism spectrum whose life has been touched by tragedy but remains charismatic and resilient in her search for new love.

Six of fifteen shorts were women-directed. Not only did London audiences get a chance to see some of the festival’s most celebrated — and, in the case of Kristen Stewart’s directorial debut “Come Swim,” perhaps, most anticipated — international short-form offerings for 2017, but a welcome spotlight was thrown on up-and-coming UK filmmakers via a dedicated UK Shorts strand. It featured Jennifer Zheng’s “Tough” — a beautiful animated meditation about the director’s mother and her early life in China during the Cultural Revolution — and Rubika Shah’s “White Riot: London,” a documentary piece about the Rock Against Racism movement.

In the The Art vs. Stepping Stone panel discussion, Palka offered advice to up-and-coming filmmakers. Producer Jessica Levick (“Personal Best,” “Legacy”) also participated. The two women shared their experiences of working with the short form and getting film projects off the ground, and both came to the reassuring conclusion that a filmmaker’s artistic vision needn’t be compromised in her search for funding.

Sundance’s Pocket-Sized London Fest Lacks Women Directors But Screens Solid Female-Led Films was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Alice Thorpe

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Kristen Stewart Is Now a Director, and Speaks For Herself: ‘Ask Me Anything!’ — Exclusive Video

31 May 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

When Kristen Stewart goes to Cannes, she’s usually promoting a movie directed by someone else — like Olivier Assayas’ “Personal Shopper,” which debuted on the Riviera last year. The actress’s Cannes anxiety usually derives from wanting to represent her director correctly, to get out the right message. But this year’s different.

“I’m not working for anyone but myself,” she says, beaming. “Ask me anything!”

Stewart came to Cannes this year as the director of her first short, the 17-minute “Come Swim.” She and her producers at Starlight Studios pitched the film to women’s website Refinery29, which also backed her chum Chloe Sevigne’s short “Kitty: The Movie.” They helped Stewart to develop her rough outline, in which she described an image of a giant wave “getting bigger and bigger” that “never breaks.” Stewart already knew just the Australian underwater photographer to shoot it. Indeed, the film »

- Anne Thompson

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Kristen Stewart Is Now a Director, and Speaks For Herself: ‘Ask Me Anything!’ — Exclusive Video

31 May 2017 10:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

When Kristen Stewart goes to Cannes, she’s usually promoting a movie directed by someone else — like Olivier Assayas’ “Personal Shopper,” which debuted on the Riviera last year. The actress’s Cannes anxiety usually derives from wanting to represent her director correctly, to get out the right message. But this year’s different.

“I’m not working for anyone but myself,” she says, beaming. “Ask me anything!”

Stewart came to Cannes this year as the director of her first short, the 17-minute “Come Swim.” She and her producers at Starlight Studios pitched the film to women’s website Refinery29, which also backed her chum Chloe Sevigne’s short “Kitty: The Movie.” They helped Stewart to develop her rough outline, in which she described an image of a giant wave “getting bigger and bigger” that “never breaks.” Stewart already knew just the Australian underwater photographer to shoot it. Indeed, the film »

- Anne Thompson

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Cannes Interview: Kristen Stewart Explains Why Directing Shouldn’t Be About Correcting

22 May 2017 12:01 PM, PDT | Women and Hollywood | See recent Women and Hollywood news »

Kristen Stewart at Cannes: The Hollywood Reporter/YouTube

Kristen Stewart is crafting a great career for herself. She shot to international stardom in “Twilight,” but it’s what she’s done after the vampire romance franchise that really makes her stand out. Instead of gravitating towards blockbusters or Oscar bait, she’s signed on to interesting indie projects and delivered standout performances in films like Kelly Reichardt’s “Certain Women” and Oliver Assayas’s “Personal Shopper” and “The Clouds of Sils Maria.” And now she’s getting into directing. She’s at Cannes screening her new short, “Come Swim.”

I spoke with Stewart about when she decided to step behind the camera, what she looks for in a project, and why she thinks directing should never be about correcting.

Come Swim” made its world premiere at Sundance in January and debuted at Cannes May 20.

This interview has been edited. It was transcribed by Kelsey Moore.

W&H: Thank you for taking the time to talk to me. Women and Hollywood focuses on feminism and the business. Here’s one of our pins.

Ks: “Educate. Advocate. Agitate.” Damn right.

W&H: I figured you’d be into it. So, where did the inspiration for this film come from?

Ks: I was sort of fixated on one image: a person sleeping on the bottom of the ocean — which is obviously a very inhospitable place for a human being to sleep — and seeing this oddly placed contentment, the satisfaction in that isolation, and wondering why that would be something pleasurable for him.

Everyone — young people, in particular — go through this kind of thing: your first disillusionment or heartbreak that puts you on the outskirts of life. You feel like you can’t participate in normal things. You ask yourself, “What the fuck? I’m here, I look like I’m here, but I’m fucking not here. I’m saturated. I’m moving through water.” It’s not necessary depression as much as it is anxiety and the inability to participate in ‘normal’ things. You aggrandize this pain when you’re little; you believe that your pain is different from the norm.

So, the idea was to source that pain and then watch someone, in a moment, just realize that they are actually completely fine. To see that one day from two different perspectives. One of which is his, and it’s so graphic, surreal, and abnormal. Then, you step outside of that, turn the lights on, and realize that, in fact, everyone has done something like that.

W&H: The beginning of the film definitely connotes the feeling of simply being overwhelmed and underwater, so that explanation helps a lot. If you had to describe a log line, what would you say to people? “Come Swim” is…?

Ks: I would say it is two perspectives of one man’s “coming to.” Also, in terms of the film’s use of voiceover, it speaks to perspective and the way you remember a situation. You can absolutely attack yourself with memories, and then if you look at the same situation from a slightly different standpoint, it can actually appear [very differently.]

Essentially, I had my two actors hang out in a pool and play-fight; they would pretend to drown each other, which sounds dramatic, but it was actually cute. In the film, the main character is a little stiff and unwilling to swim; he doesn’t like water. Theoretically, they broke up, and all he’s doing is thinking about what he could have done differently to avoid messing that up. He keeps asking himself, “Why didn’t I want to swim with her? What did I say? God, everything about me is terrible.”

You just start going back into your memory bank, asking yourself what you could have done differently. But, if you get past that, you realize that those were actually fun memories that you repurpose as being awful.

So, I used the same voiceovers in different places with slightly different readings. Some would be ominous, aggressive, and scary, and then the same exact words would be said through laughter to create a different, lovely memory.

W&H: Was this personal for you?

Ks: 100 percent.

W&H: What made you decide to write and direct? When did you know that you wanted to do this?

Ks: I’ve wanted to make movies since I was about nine or ten years old — as soon as I wanted to act. I’ve watched the process since I was a baby. My mom , Jules Mann-Stewart, is a script supervisor, and my dad, John Stewart, was an Ad for television. I was always on set with my mom, and she’s always worked very closely with directors.

I wanted to be on set. I loved the team effort of it all. I really loved that people would do crazy, crazy things, and I thought that the grind of it all must have been worth something. To be a part of that was really attractive.

As I got older and started actually being a part of that process, I realized how spiritual it can be; the only thing that would drive someone to work this hard is this compulsive, artistic, protective nature: the need to protect a story, to make sure that one’s experience with it can be transferred onto others because it’s worth it.

The best directors I’ve ever worked with always make you feel like you have a hand in holding this bowl of water. You need to get it to the end of the line, and it’s tipping in every direction. But, if we all hold an equal part, we can get it to the end, and all of the water will still be in the bowl.

W&H: That’s a nice image. I’m sure you’ve worked with some directors that you’ve loved and some that you haven’t loved. What have you learned from directors — both good and bad — that you took into this project?

Ks: Directing is kind of a strange word because it implies that you’re telling people what to do. The best feeling in the entire world is wanting something, transferring that desire to others, and watching it become a selfish thing for them — something that has nothing to do with doing me a favor or satisfying a job. It’s actually this transference of desire. All of a sudden, they reach a place where they start to own it for themselves.

Directing is never correcting; that’s the worst. You can influence people, but, at the end of the day, you’ve put people in place because you’re inspired by them. You want to watch what they do.

W&H: The other day during a Women in Motion talk Robin Wright said to “never say no.”

Ks: Right. Because even if you don’t like something, don’t tell them. Just don’t use it. If someone is on a path, don’t derail them. The whole reason you are there is to explore something. It is not to finitely control this experience. You want someone to discover and experience.

I don’t want to package and deliver ideas; I want to get everyone in a room, meditate on a subject, capture it, put it together, and put it out. I’m not too precious about it.

W&H: That’s why I think women are such good directors; we know how to bring lots of people together because that’s how we’re socialized.

Speaking of women directors, you did “Twilight” with Catherine Hardwicke. Even though that was the highest grossing movie by a woman at that moment, she had to take a pay cut for her subsequent film. Even now, she continues to struggle to get to that next movie. What are your thoughts on that and opportunities for women?

Ks: There is utter value in a commercially-driven decision making process. I want people to see the movies that I work on. I want them to reach as many people as possible. But, people that really get it done are just so compulsive.

Look at someone like Andrea Arnold. She tells her own stories. She’s not a hired hand. Nobody could tell the stories that she’s telling. They are hers. They come from her.

It is undoubtedly annoying that it’s still taking a long time to balance out. There is no equality in this business.

W&H: It’s not even close to it here. Women directors made up four percent in the top 100 grossing films last year.

Ks: This is always kind of hard to speak to.

W&H: I know. There isn’t an answer, but you’re a person so steeped in it. you’ve worked with both men and women, like Kelly Reichardt. Everyone wants to work with her, yet she gets so little money for her films.

Ks: I know, but that speaks to who she is as well.

W&H: She’d like a little bit more money.

Ks: Definitely, but if you look at the types of movies that she does, they don’t make a lot of money.

W&H: Well, I also believe it’s a vicious cycle. If it were in more theaters, then more people would see it, and so on.

Ks: Sure. Do you think that they’re not in more theaters because she’s a woman?

W&H: I think some films are not in more theaters because they don’t have enough of a budget to warrant more theaters; they don’t have the marketing budget to push them over the edge. But, even Andrea Arnold’s last film, “American Honey,” was pretty commercial. It could have played more, and it could have been an Oscar consideration.

Ks: I was shocked it wasn’t.

W&H: Right. It doesn’t rise to the occasion, and that speaks to the overwhelming amount of male critics on some level. It’s a very hard cycle to break. You’ve seen so much of it, and now you’re entering it. You’re going to be a director, and you want to continue to act and write as well. You’re going to be in this world. How do you navigate that?

Ks: I’m so lucky. I have people who listen. I’m in a very lucky place.

W&H: It’s interesting because I live in New York, and I write about feminism and Hollywood. I’m always a bit shocked when I come to a place like this or go to La and see the machinery behind it all.

That’s something that you live through. You seem like an incredibly happy, lovely human being. I don’t know you, but people weirdly think they know you. How do you keep your own identity and yet give people what they need to promote your movies?

Ks: Right now it’s strange because I’m not working for anyone. I’m less nervous here because I’m not overtly concerned about representing a director and the way he wants a story to be spoken about.

W&H: Because the director is you.

Ks: Yeah. That’s a trip, and that’s fucking amazing. I had to sort of relinquish the notion that you can control the way people see you. You can’t. When you try to, you start becoming oddly and ironically disingenuous because you want others to think a certain thing.

Honestly, you literally just have to be protective — but not guarded — and be honest about what you care about and what you don’t.

I can talk to you because this is a conversation — but I have to abandon the idea that anyone is going to read this, because then you start thinking about what it will sound like to everyone else. This conversation can exist right here and people can read it for what it is, but addressing the world at large is [overwhelming]. I don’t think about it. I just try to have individual conversations with people, and when I don’t have to do press, I work.

W&H: So, you probably get tons and tons of scripts, and you’ve made such interesting decisions. I loved “Clouds of Sils Maria.” What a great movie. Talk a little bit about how you make your acting choices.

Ks: It’s always really instinctive. I never know what I’m going to be doing. There may be a subject I want to explore, but that’s typically as a filmmaker rather than an actor.

As an actor, I want to read something and feel like it lives so fully that I need to preserve that life. It’s hard for me to develop projects with people because it needs to preexist in me in order for me to honor it.

W&H: Are you interested in producing as well then?

Ks: No. That’s the last thing I want to do. I hate development meetings. If a character doesn’t exist yet, I of course would be interested in writing and directing that project. But, I don’t know if I could necessarily act in something like that because I’d know it’s a farce — I’d know that I made it up.

I need to feel like a character literally existed, like I’m reading a history book and people need to know this story.

W&H: So, you had a lot of female crew members on this. Was that something that you wanted, or were they just the best people for the job?

Ks: To be honest, they were the best people for the job. It wasn’t totally intentional. But, I think if I had a fully male crew, I would have noticed and done something to fix that.

https://medium.com/media/400807fd969602d97c18f2700b92671d/href

Cannes Interview: Kristen Stewart Explains Why Directing Shouldn’t Be About Correcting was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story. »

- Melissa Silverstein

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Kristen Stewart on her directing debut: 'The best female film-makers are compulsive freaks'

22 May 2017 9:56 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Twilight actor is at Cannes to show Come Swim, her film about heartbreak starring a man who can’t quench his thirst

In a suite at the Hotel Majestic Barrière in Cannes, every surface heaves with haute couture. Chanel dresses spun from gossamer threads are draped along the walls and chunky, diamond-studded bracelets are scattered across the dresser. Only the suite’s occupant doesn’t seem to have received the memo. Kristen Stewart, dressed in a vest and black cargo pants, her hair in a blond crop, looks almost defiantly out of place.

But Stewart is not quite the incongruous presence she might seem at the festival. In 2014, she became the first female American actor in 30 years to win a Cesar, for best supporting actress in Olivier Assayas’s Clouds of Sils Maria. More recently, there was her bewitchingly odd performance in Personal Shopper, Assayas’s strange, sad, ruminative ghost story. »

- Gwilym Mumford

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Kristen Stewart Brings Directorial Debut ‘Come Swim’ To Cannes

21 May 2017 9:08 AM, PDT | ET Canada | See recent ET Canada news »

Kristen Stewart is attending the Cannes Film Festival once again — but this time, her role isn’t as a movie star, but as a first-time director promoting her first film. The “Personal Shopper” star is making the rounds at the annual film fest to promote “Come Swim”, her 17-minute foray into the nature of grief, […] »

- Brent Furdyk

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Kristen Stewart Hits the Cannes Red Carpet in Appropriately Edgy Look

20 May 2017 10:17 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Kristen Stewart is never boring on red carpets.

On Saturday, the actress stepped out for the Cannes Film Festival premiere of her directorial debut, Come Swim, wearing a getup as unique as she is. Stewart chose a long, gray-patterned skirt with suspenders and a peach bandeaux on top. The actress paired her look with a striking smokey eye that contrasted against her bleach blonde shaved head.

Stewart topped off the look with strappy black heels — and the actress had a lot to say about the required footwear in an interview shortly before hitting the carpet. Stewart spoke with The Hollywood »

- Ale Russian

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Will Smith Brings Star Power to Cannes and Defends Netflix’s Place at the Festival

17 May 2017 3:56 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Bonjour, Monsieur Smith.

Will Smith injected some star power to the opening night of the 70th Cannes Film Festival, greeting fans gathered in the Côte d’Azur on Wednesday.

Looking dashing in black tux, Smith joked about his hometown to a group of festival goers, saying, “West Philadelphia is a long way from Cannes.”

Smith is a member of this year’s festival jury, which also includes Jessica Chastain, Paolo Sorrentino and Park Chan-wook.

Also supplying the star power on Wednesday was Marion Cotillard, who stars alongside Charlotte Gainsbourg in French director Arnaud Desplechin’s Ismael’s Ghosts, which premiere on opening night. »

- Mike Miller

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Matrix Star Monica Bellucci Kicks Off Cannes Film Festival with a Very French Make-Out Session

17 May 2017 2:31 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

So that’s how they kick off award shows in France!

Matrix star Monica Bellucci, who’s serving as Master of Ceremonies at the 70th annual Cannes Film Festival, showed off her seduction skills with a gag during the festival’s opening ceremony Wednesday evening.

The Italian model and actress, 52, surprised the audience at the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès by having a steamy, faux make-out session with her co-host, French comedian Alex Lutz.

Wearing a flowing, semi-sheer black Dior gown, the former Bond girl grabbed a handful of the comedian’s hair as she pushed his face toward her own before locking lips. »

- Mike Miller

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Robert Pattinson Will Rewrite His Career at Cannes, and 7 More Predictions About This Year’s Fest

16 May 2017 11:13 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

While the Cannes Film Festival is the showboat film festival to end all festivals, all of that is a springboard for the talking. Talking about the movies, talking about the movie industry, talking about the talking. Last year, the talking points were the persistence of Kristen Stewart, Woody Allen and Ronan Farrow, auteurs like Jim Jarmusch and Nicolas Winding Refn, and women (or the lack thereof). This year, we’ve read the Croisette crystal ball for the conversations likely to dominate the festival in the days to come. This isn’t necessarily about must-see titles (we’ve got those covered here); these are the stories most likely to be heard beyond the Cannes bubble. Here’s a look at the news cycle to come.

Read More: The Potential Oscar Contenders at Cannes 2017: A Rundown

Nicole Kidman Takes Charge

If last year’s Cannes It Girl was brainy “Personal Shopper »

- Anne Thompson and Eric Kohn

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Robert Pattinson Will Rewrite His Career at Cannes, and 7 More Predictions About This Year’s Fest

16 May 2017 11:13 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

While the Cannes Film Festival is the showboat film festival to end all festivals, all of that is a springboard for the talking. Talking about the movies, talking about the movie industry, talking about the talking. Last year, the talking points were the persistence of Kristen Stewart, Woody Allen and Ronan Farrow, auteurs like Jim Jarmusch and Nicolas Winding Refn, and women (or the lack thereof). This year, we’ve read the Croisette crystal ball for the conversations likely to dominate the festival in the days to come. This isn’t necessarily about must-see titles (we’ve got those covered here); these are the stories most likely to be heard beyond the Cannes bubble. Here’s a look at the news cycle to come.

Read More: The Potential Oscar Contenders at Cannes 2017: A Rundown

Nicole Kidman Takes Charge

If last year’s Cannes It Girl was brainy “Personal Shopper »

- Anne Thompson and Eric Kohn

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Kristen Stewart’s Intimate and Lush Music Video for Chvrches Shows Off Burgeoning Director’s Style — Watch

28 April 2017 7:33 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Burgeoning filmmaker Kristen Stewart — perhaps you’ve heard of her? — is continuing to enhance both her style and her profile with a brand new music video for Chvrches, first teased earlier this month.

The full video has now arrived, and it shows off an intimate and lush approach to the material, which features the band recording a new live version of their “Down Side of Me,” which first appeared on their album “Every Open Eye.” The band has recorded this new version to appear on “7-inches for Planned Parenthood,” a compilation of records and digital singles all released to benefit Planned Parenthood. The “7-inches for Planned Parenthood” vinyl boxset should hit stores this fall.

Read More: How Kristen Stewart and Olivier Assayas Bring the Dead Back to Life in ‘Personal Shopper

Pitchfork shares that, in a press release, Lauren Mayberry said, “‘Down Side Of Me’ was not written specifically for »

- Kate Erbland

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Cannes 2017. Lineup

27 April 2017 11:14 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The Festival de Cannes has announced the lineup for the official selection, including the Competition and Un Certain Regard sections, as well as special screenings, for the 70th edition of the festival:

COMPETITIONHappy End (Michael Haneke)Wonderstruck (Todd Haynes)Le Redoutable (Michel Hazanavicius)The Beguiled (Sofia Coppola)Rodin (Jaques Doillon)120 Beats Per Minute (Robin Campillo)Okja (Bong Joon-Ho)In The Fade (Fatih Akin)The Day After (Hong Sang-soo)Radiance (Naomi Kawase)The Killing Of A Sacred Deer (Yorgos Lanthimos)A Gentle Creature (Sergei Loznitsa)Jupiter's Moon (Kornél Mandruczó)Good Time (Benny Safdie & Josh Safdie)Loveless (Andrey ZvyagintsevL'Amant Double (François Ozon)You Were Never Really Here (Lynne Ramsay)The Meyerowitz Stories (Noah Baumbach)The Square (Ruben Östlund)Un Certain REGARDOpening Night: Barbara (Mathieu Amalric)The Desert Bride (Cecilia Atan & Valeria Pivato)Lucky (Sergio Castellitto)Closeness (Kantemir Balagov)Before We Vanish (Kiyoshi Kurosawa)Beauty and the Dogs (Kaouther Ben Hania)L »

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Sundance London Announces Full Lineup, With a Surprise Film and New Audience Award

25 April 2017 3:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

David Lowery’s “A Ghost Story” will close this year’s Sundance Film Festival: London, organizers said Tuesday, unveiling the festival’s full lineup. Lowery will also headline the events section of the program with an onstage interview.

This fest will present 14 features that saw their world premieres at parent festival Sundance in Park City, Utah, in January. The films were selected by the Sundance Institute programming team in conjunction with Picturehouse. Miguel Arteta’s “Beatriz at Dinner” was previously announced as the opening film for Sundance London, which takes place for a second year at Picturehouse Central in the British capital’s Soho district, from June 1-4.

“As we head into our fifth festival in London, we remain committed to introducing new American independent films to audiences around the world,” said Robert Redford, president and founder of Sundance Institute. “Our success in the U.K. is a reflection of »

- Robert Mitchell

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'The Big Sick,' 'Marjorie Prime,' Kristen Stewart's Short Heading to Sundance London

25 April 2017 2:59 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The program for the 2017 edition of Sundance Film Festival: London, the Utah festival's British spin-off, has been announced. 

Fourteen feature films have been selected from the offerings at Park City in January, including the Judd Apatow-produced comedy The Big Sick, Jon Hamm-starrer Marjorie Prime, Brooklyn-based actioner Bushwick and environmental documentary Chasing Coral, which won the U.S. doc audience award. Also in the lineup are 15 shorts, including Come Swim, written and directed by Kristen Stewart. The festival will close with David Lowery's A Ghost Story, starring Casey Affleck and Rooney Mara. Lowery will also take part in one of the »

- Alex Ritman

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Kristen Stewart Directs New Music Video for Chvrches — Watch

19 April 2017 12:15 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Chvrches has created a new version of their song “Down Side of Me” in support of Planned Parenthood. The Scottish band has just teased the upcoming video for the song, which was directed by Kristen Stewart. The actress broke the news about this collaboration during an interview with The New York Times last month.

“I had been asking them to let me do something for them for a while,” Stewart told the Times of the pop trio. “They’re so good. I ended up with a pretty simple but definitive narrative arc that highlights the cause in a sweet but quiet and confronting way.”

Read More: Lena Dunham Releases Animated Planned Parenthood Tribute Featuring Meryl Streep, Jennifer Lawrence and More

The remake of the song, which hails from the trio’s 2015 album “Every Open Eye,” will be part of the “7-Inches For Planned Parenthood,” a curated series of 7-inch vinyl records, »

- Yoselin Acevedo

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Taking a Closer Look at the Cannes Line-Up

15 April 2017 9:59 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Sophia Coppola, Yorgos Lanthimos, Noah Baumbach, ‘Twin Peaks,’ and more…2017 Official Poster © Bronx (Paris). Photo: Claudia Cardinale © Archivio Cameraphoto Epoche/Getty Images

The official lineup for the 70th Cannes Film Festival, which will run from May 18–28, was announced April 13. While a few more screenings will undoubtably be added as we creep nearer to the festival, the selections announced feature a lot worth getting excited over — including, for the first time, two television shows (Twin Peaks and Top of the Lake) and a virtual reality film (Carne y Arena). Also, considering that The Killing of a Sacred Deer and The Beguiled are both in the main competition, there is, assuming equal probability, an 11.1% chance that a film starring Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell will take home the top prize. Considering

This year, the festival jury will be headed by acclaimed Spanish director Pedro Almodovar, with French actress Sandrine Kiberlain presiding over the Camera d’Or jury and Romanian »

- Ciara Wardlow

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