Come Swim (2017) - News Poster

(2017)

News

Watch: 'Come Swim' - Kristen Stewart's Very Abstract New Short Film

"What's wrong... you can't breathe underwater?" Refinery29 has debuted the online version of Kristen Stewart's acclaimed new short film titled Come Swim, which played at the Sundance and Cannes Film Festivals this year. There was big buzz on this, as it's big directorial debut for the famed actress Kristen Stewart, and it's weird and wacky and experimental, and some of you are going to hate it. But maybe some of you will love it. The short film is described as a "diptych of one man's day; half impressionist and half realist portraits." The short film also features a score by the American musician known as St. Vincent. This has some cool shots in it, but it's so frickin' crazy abstract, I don't even know what to say about it. I'm glad she's trying something different, but I hope her next film is a bit more coherent. Watch Come Swim below.
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Kristen Stewart Slays in Rocker Chic Look at L.A. Event -- See the Pics!

Kristen Stewart is red hot!

The 27-year-old actress attended the 2017 American Cinematheque Award Presentation in Beverly Hills, California, on Friday night.

Stewart turned heads looking rocker chic in a red geometric Julien Macdonald cutout dress, which she accessorized with barely-there gold heels.

Photo: John Sciulli/Getty Images

Related: Kristen Stewart Says She's Been 'Deeply in Love With Everyone' She's Dated, Is Open to Having a Boyfriend Agai

The Personal Shopper star had some fun with her look and opted for a spiky hair-do and matching red eye shadow.

Photo: John Sciulli/Getty Images

Stewart, along with Natalie Portman, Tom Hanks, Justin Timberlake, Jake Gyllenhaal and Michael Shannon, were on hand to honor five-time Oscar nominee, Amy Adams. The actress was awarded the 31st American Cinematheque Award for her achievements in film. 

Photo: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Related: Amy Adams' First Selfie Ever is Stunning -- See the Pic!

Earlier this week, Stewart attended a screening
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

Watch: Kristen Stewart’s Directorial Debut ‘Come Swim’ Scored by St. Vincent

Having worked with Olivier Assayas, David Fincher, Kelly Reichardt, Ang Lee, and more, Kristen Stewart has certainly seen a fair amount of talented directors working behind the camera. This year, she debuted her first effort as a director with the expressionistic short film Come Swim, which debuted at Sundance, stopped by Cannes, and is now available to stream.

Produced and distributed by Refinery29, the short, which is scored by St. Vincent, follows an abstract, surrealistic journey of a man battling inner demons. “I just wanted to externalize a very internal feeling that you don’t really talk about until it’s past and then you go, ‘God, I was losing my mind. It’s so crazy, I was such a weirdo for six months, I’m so sorry to all my friends.’ Not to be too heavy about it, because it’s not clinical or anything, but it is a form of depression,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Kristen Stewart Debuts Edgy Punk Hairdo To ‘Come Swim’ Premiere

  • Uinterview
Kristen Stewart wore a punk rock outfit, complete with spiked hair and dark eyeliner, to the premiere of Starlight Studios’s Come Swim. Kristen Stewart At Come Swim Premiere The actress, 27, wore loose-fitting bright pink pants that hit the ground, and a white crop top full of holes around the collar. She bared her muscular midriff and […]

Source: uInterview

The post Kristen Stewart Debuts Edgy Punk Hairdo To ‘Come Swim’ Premiere appeared first on uInterview.
See full article at Uinterview »

Stream Kristen Stewart’s Directorial Debut ‘Come Swim’

When Kristen Stewart‘s directorial debut, “Come Swim,” was first announced to premiere at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, the synopsis made it clear it wasn’t going to be your standard narrative:

This is a diptych of one man’s day, half impressionist and half realist portraits.

Indeed, the 18-minute short film — which features a score by St. Vincent — is an avant-garde piece about memory and love lost.

Continue reading Stream Kristen Stewart’s Directorial Debut ‘Come Swim’ at The Playlist.
See full article at The Playlist »

‘Come Swim’: Stream Kristen Stewart’s Avant-Garde Directorial Debut For Free — Watch

‘Come Swim’: Stream Kristen Stewart’s Avant-Garde Directorial Debut For Free — Watch
Kristen Stewart’s directorial debut, “Come Swim,” has already been shown to audiences at Sundance and Cannes this year, but now it’s time for the world to discover what the indie darling has come up with in her first time behind the camera for a narrative feature. The short film, produced by David Ethan Shapiro and scored by St. Vincent, is now streaming for free as part of Refinery29’s Shatterbox Shorts program.

Read More:Kristen Stewart Explains Why She Didn’t Cast Herself in Her Short Directorial Debut, ‘Come Swim

Back at the New York Film Festival in 2016, Stewart called directing “Come Swim” the “most satisfying” project of her career. “As an actor, you’re like a little thing that can help everyone feel this, but when it comes from you — it’s like validation in the most ultimate,” she said of directing. “You’re not alone. Like,
See full article at Indiewire »

Why Filmmakers Turn to Short Films To Achieve Their Vision (Video)

  • The Wrap
Making a film is already an immense undertaking, but for short film creators, finding distribution and a platform to reach audiences is a particular challenge. For the artists, talent and distributors on TheWrap’s Shorts Panel at the Landmark Theatres in Los Angeles Wednesday night, meeting that challenge was about finding the right people to enact their vision. “It’s about disrupting a model,” said Amy Emmerich, Chief Content Officer of Refinery29, which distributed two of the presented short films, “Lucia, Before and After” and Kristen Stewart’s “Come Swim.” “Sometimes a story can be told in many different lengths,
See full article at The Wrap »

How Refinery29’s Female Filmmaker-Focused Shatterbox Shorts Are Creating the Next Generation of Auteurs

How Refinery29’s Female Filmmaker-Focused Shatterbox Shorts Are Creating the Next Generation of Auteurs
Girl Talk is a weekly look at women in film — past, present, and future.

When the popular women-focused lifestyle website Refinery29 began to build out its original video assets, they hit a stumbling block: they wanted more women creators to make their projects, but they couldn’t seem to find them through traditional means.

“We were building so many things simultaneously,” Chief Content Officer Amy Emmerich recently explained to IndieWire. “And having such a tough time finding women directors and hearing what the agents would say to us, like, ‘We don’t have someone who is a comedy director for you,’ or ‘There aren’t that many,’ and we kind of looked at each other, like, ‘What the hell is happening?'”

For a female-focused business, that idea just wasn’t tenable, and Emmerich and scripted programming executive producer Shannon Gibson set out to launch their own program aimed at female creators.
See full article at Indiewire »

Kristen Stewart and Lupita Nyong’o Eyed For ‘Charlie’s Angels’ Reboot

Kristen Stewart and Lupita Nyong’o Eyed For ‘Charlie’s Angels’ Reboot
Kristen Stewart is being floated for Sony’s “Charlie’s Angels” reboot, reports Variety. Actress and “Pitch Perfect 2” director Elizabeth Banks is signed on to direct. The studio is also floating Oscar-winner Lupita Nyong’o to be part of the ass-kicking trio of private detectives.

If Stewart does sign on, it would be the actress’ first studio film since 2012’s “Snow White and the Huntsman.” The “Twilight” star has wracked up an impressive roster of highly acclaimed indie films in recent years, including Olivier Assayas’ “Clouds of Sils Maria” and “Personal Shopper,” Kelly Reichardt’s “Certain Women,” and Woody Allen’s “Cafe Society.”

Read More:Kristen Stewart Explains Why She Didn’t Cast Herself in Her Short Directorial Debut, ‘Come Swim

Since her Oscar-winning breakout in Steve McQueen’s “12 Years a Slave,” Nyong’o has filmed multiple “Star Wars” movies, as well as Jon Favreau’s “The Jungle Book.
See full article at Indiewire »

Kristen Stewart Explains Why She Didn’t Cast Herself in Her Short Directorial Debut, ‘Come Swim’

Kristen Stewart Explains Why She Didn’t Cast Herself in Her Short Directorial Debut, ‘Come Swim’
Kristen Stewart’s second act isn’t just in the works, it’s here. The long-time actress — at age 27, she’s already been acting professionally for more than half her life — initially dreamed of being a filmmaker, a desire she’s lately been putting into practice through short-form directorial opportunities, including a Chvrches music video and her directorial film debut, the short “Come Swim.” The film bowed earlier this year at Sundance, before going on to screen at Cannes and, most recently, a slot as part of Sundance’s traveling Short Film Tour.

Produced as part of Refinery29’s Shatterbox Anthology — a collection of short films all made by women, and of every stripe, from well-known names like Stewart to rising stars like Courtney Hoffman — the film’s short synopsis bills it as “a diptych of one man’s day; half impressionist and half realist portraits.” Part dreamy (and often unnerving) fable,
See full article at Indiewire »

'2017 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour': Film Review

'2017 Sundance Film Festival Short Film Tour': Film Review
Kristen Stewart's directing debut may be the biggest draw in this year's touring package of Sundance-alum short films. But as usual with these anthologies, the real stars are sometimes filmmakers you didn't know you came to see. A varied program ranging from naughty animation to a viral-video gem, the presentation likely contains an Oscar contender or two; supporters of shorts-in-cinemas efforts will be happy to have bought a ticket.

Stewart's Come Swim is by a wide margin the most self-consciously arty entry here, an expressionistic collage full of drowning imagery and whispered voiceover conversations. Is it a dream? A pre-death...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Sundance’s Pocket-Sized London Fest Lacks Women Directors But Screens Solid Female-Led Films

Director Marianna Palka’s “Bitch” screened at Sundance: London: Palka’s Instagram account

The fifth edition of Sundance: London came to a close this weekend. The festival, which cherry-picks a handful of films screened at its American parent festival each year to show across the pond, presented a program of 14 feature-length movies, 15 shorts, and various panel discussions over four days in collaboration with Picturehouse Cinemas.

Of the 14 features shown — which included both fiction and documentary selections — only one had a female director, but the pocket-sized fest still managed to pack in a fair amount of women-centric programming. Alongside Marianna Palka’s surreal feminist satire “Bitch,” which she directed, wrote, and starred in, there were also standout performances to enjoy from Jessica Williams (“The Daily Show”), who lives up to her character’s billing in “The Incredible Jessica James,” and veteran screen actress Lois Smith (“Please Give”) who plays the title character in the speculative sci-fi film “Marjorie Prime.” Meanwhile, on the documentary side of things, Sundance’s U.S. doc grand jury prize winner “Dina” also screened. The film stars its eponymous subject, a woman on the autism spectrum whose life has been touched by tragedy but remains charismatic and resilient in her search for new love.

Six of fifteen shorts were women-directed. Not only did London audiences get a chance to see some of the festival’s most celebrated — and, in the case of Kristen Stewart’s directorial debut “Come Swim,” perhaps, most anticipated — international short-form offerings for 2017, but a welcome spotlight was thrown on up-and-coming UK filmmakers via a dedicated UK Shorts strand. It featured Jennifer Zheng’s “Tough” — a beautiful animated meditation about the director’s mother and her early life in China during the Cultural Revolution — and Rubika Shah’s “White Riot: London,” a documentary piece about the Rock Against Racism movement.

In the The Art vs. Stepping Stone panel discussion, Palka offered advice to up-and-coming filmmakers. Producer Jessica Levick (“Personal Best,” “Legacy”) also participated. The two women shared their experiences of working with the short form and getting film projects off the ground, and both came to the reassuring conclusion that a filmmaker’s artistic vision needn’t be compromised in her search for funding.

Sundance’s Pocket-Sized London Fest Lacks Women Directors But Screens Solid Female-Led Films was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Kristen Stewart Is Now a Director, and Speaks For Herself: ‘Ask Me Anything!’ — Exclusive Video

Kristen Stewart Is Now a Director, and Speaks For Herself:  ‘Ask Me Anything!’ — Exclusive Video
When Kristen Stewart goes to Cannes, she’s usually promoting a movie directed by someone else — like Olivier Assayas’ “Personal Shopper,” which debuted on the Riviera last year. The actress’s Cannes anxiety usually derives from wanting to represent her director correctly, to get out the right message. But this year’s different.

“I’m not working for anyone but myself,” she says, beaming. “Ask me anything!”

Stewart came to Cannes this year as the director of her first short, the 17-minute “Come Swim.” She and her producers at Starlight Studios pitched the film to women’s website Refinery29, which also backed her chum Chloe Sevigne’s short “Kitty: The Movie.” They helped Stewart to develop her rough outline, in which she described an image of a giant wave “getting bigger and bigger” that “never breaks.” Stewart already knew just the Australian underwater photographer to shoot it. Indeed, the film
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Kristen Stewart Is Now a Director, and Speaks For Herself: ‘Ask Me Anything!’ — Exclusive Video

Kristen Stewart Is Now a Director, and Speaks For Herself:  ‘Ask Me Anything!’ — Exclusive Video
When Kristen Stewart goes to Cannes, she’s usually promoting a movie directed by someone else — like Olivier Assayas’ “Personal Shopper,” which debuted on the Riviera last year. The actress’s Cannes anxiety usually derives from wanting to represent her director correctly, to get out the right message. But this year’s different.

“I’m not working for anyone but myself,” she says, beaming. “Ask me anything!”

Stewart came to Cannes this year as the director of her first short, the 17-minute “Come Swim.” She and her producers at Starlight Studios pitched the film to women’s website Refinery29, which also backed her chum Chloe Sevigne’s short “Kitty: The Movie.” They helped Stewart to develop her rough outline, in which she described an image of a giant wave “getting bigger and bigger” that “never breaks.” Stewart already knew just the Australian underwater photographer to shoot it. Indeed, the film
See full article at Indiewire »

Cannes Interview: Kristen Stewart Explains Why Directing Shouldn’t Be About Correcting

Kristen Stewart at Cannes: The Hollywood Reporter/YouTube

Kristen Stewart is crafting a great career for herself. She shot to international stardom in “Twilight,” but it’s what she’s done after the vampire romance franchise that really makes her stand out. Instead of gravitating towards blockbusters or Oscar bait, she’s signed on to interesting indie projects and delivered standout performances in films like Kelly Reichardt’s “Certain Women” and Oliver Assayas’s “Personal Shopper” and “The Clouds of Sils Maria.” And now she’s getting into directing. She’s at Cannes screening her new short, “Come Swim.”

I spoke with Stewart about when she decided to step behind the camera, what she looks for in a project, and why she thinks directing should never be about correcting.

Come Swim” made its world premiere at Sundance in January and debuted at Cannes May 20.

This interview has been edited. It was transcribed by Kelsey Moore.

W&H: Thank you for taking the time to talk to me. Women and Hollywood focuses on feminism and the business. Here’s one of our pins.

Ks: “Educate. Advocate. Agitate.” Damn right.

W&H: I figured you’d be into it. So, where did the inspiration for this film come from?

Ks: I was sort of fixated on one image: a person sleeping on the bottom of the ocean — which is obviously a very inhospitable place for a human being to sleep — and seeing this oddly placed contentment, the satisfaction in that isolation, and wondering why that would be something pleasurable for him.

Everyone — young people, in particular — go through this kind of thing: your first disillusionment or heartbreak that puts you on the outskirts of life. You feel like you can’t participate in normal things. You ask yourself, “What the fuck? I’m here, I look like I’m here, but I’m fucking not here. I’m saturated. I’m moving through water.” It’s not necessary depression as much as it is anxiety and the inability to participate in ‘normal’ things. You aggrandize this pain when you’re little; you believe that your pain is different from the norm.

So, the idea was to source that pain and then watch someone, in a moment, just realize that they are actually completely fine. To see that one day from two different perspectives. One of which is his, and it’s so graphic, surreal, and abnormal. Then, you step outside of that, turn the lights on, and realize that, in fact, everyone has done something like that.

W&H: The beginning of the film definitely connotes the feeling of simply being overwhelmed and underwater, so that explanation helps a lot. If you had to describe a log line, what would you say to people? “Come Swim” is…?

Ks: I would say it is two perspectives of one man’s “coming to.” Also, in terms of the film’s use of voiceover, it speaks to perspective and the way you remember a situation. You can absolutely attack yourself with memories, and then if you look at the same situation from a slightly different standpoint, it can actually appear [very differently.]

Essentially, I had my two actors hang out in a pool and play-fight; they would pretend to drown each other, which sounds dramatic, but it was actually cute. In the film, the main character is a little stiff and unwilling to swim; he doesn’t like water. Theoretically, they broke up, and all he’s doing is thinking about what he could have done differently to avoid messing that up. He keeps asking himself, “Why didn’t I want to swim with her? What did I say? God, everything about me is terrible.”

You just start going back into your memory bank, asking yourself what you could have done differently. But, if you get past that, you realize that those were actually fun memories that you repurpose as being awful.

So, I used the same voiceovers in different places with slightly different readings. Some would be ominous, aggressive, and scary, and then the same exact words would be said through laughter to create a different, lovely memory.

W&H: Was this personal for you?

Ks: 100 percent.

W&H: What made you decide to write and direct? When did you know that you wanted to do this?

Ks: I’ve wanted to make movies since I was about nine or ten years old — as soon as I wanted to act. I’ve watched the process since I was a baby. My mom , Jules Mann-Stewart, is a script supervisor, and my dad, John Stewart, was an Ad for television. I was always on set with my mom, and she’s always worked very closely with directors.

I wanted to be on set. I loved the team effort of it all. I really loved that people would do crazy, crazy things, and I thought that the grind of it all must have been worth something. To be a part of that was really attractive.

As I got older and started actually being a part of that process, I realized how spiritual it can be; the only thing that would drive someone to work this hard is this compulsive, artistic, protective nature: the need to protect a story, to make sure that one’s experience with it can be transferred onto others because it’s worth it.

The best directors I’ve ever worked with always make you feel like you have a hand in holding this bowl of water. You need to get it to the end of the line, and it’s tipping in every direction. But, if we all hold an equal part, we can get it to the end, and all of the water will still be in the bowl.

W&H: That’s a nice image. I’m sure you’ve worked with some directors that you’ve loved and some that you haven’t loved. What have you learned from directors — both good and bad — that you took into this project?

Ks: Directing is kind of a strange word because it implies that you’re telling people what to do. The best feeling in the entire world is wanting something, transferring that desire to others, and watching it become a selfish thing for them — something that has nothing to do with doing me a favor or satisfying a job. It’s actually this transference of desire. All of a sudden, they reach a place where they start to own it for themselves.

Directing is never correcting; that’s the worst. You can influence people, but, at the end of the day, you’ve put people in place because you’re inspired by them. You want to watch what they do.

W&H: The other day during a Women in Motion talk Robin Wright said to “never say no.”

Ks: Right. Because even if you don’t like something, don’t tell them. Just don’t use it. If someone is on a path, don’t derail them. The whole reason you are there is to explore something. It is not to finitely control this experience. You want someone to discover and experience.

I don’t want to package and deliver ideas; I want to get everyone in a room, meditate on a subject, capture it, put it together, and put it out. I’m not too precious about it.

W&H: That’s why I think women are such good directors; we know how to bring lots of people together because that’s how we’re socialized.

Speaking of women directors, you did “Twilight” with Catherine Hardwicke. Even though that was the highest grossing movie by a woman at that moment, she had to take a pay cut for her subsequent film. Even now, she continues to struggle to get to that next movie. What are your thoughts on that and opportunities for women?

Ks: There is utter value in a commercially-driven decision making process. I want people to see the movies that I work on. I want them to reach as many people as possible. But, people that really get it done are just so compulsive.

Look at someone like Andrea Arnold. She tells her own stories. She’s not a hired hand. Nobody could tell the stories that she’s telling. They are hers. They come from her.

It is undoubtedly annoying that it’s still taking a long time to balance out. There is no equality in this business.

W&H: It’s not even close to it here. Women directors made up four percent in the top 100 grossing films last year.

Ks: This is always kind of hard to speak to.

W&H: I know. There isn’t an answer, but you’re a person so steeped in it. you’ve worked with both men and women, like Kelly Reichardt. Everyone wants to work with her, yet she gets so little money for her films.

Ks: I know, but that speaks to who she is as well.

W&H: She’d like a little bit more money.

Ks: Definitely, but if you look at the types of movies that she does, they don’t make a lot of money.

W&H: Well, I also believe it’s a vicious cycle. If it were in more theaters, then more people would see it, and so on.

Ks: Sure. Do you think that they’re not in more theaters because she’s a woman?

W&H: I think some films are not in more theaters because they don’t have enough of a budget to warrant more theaters; they don’t have the marketing budget to push them over the edge. But, even Andrea Arnold’s last film, “American Honey,” was pretty commercial. It could have played more, and it could have been an Oscar consideration.

Ks: I was shocked it wasn’t.

W&H: Right. It doesn’t rise to the occasion, and that speaks to the overwhelming amount of male critics on some level. It’s a very hard cycle to break. You’ve seen so much of it, and now you’re entering it. You’re going to be a director, and you want to continue to act and write as well. You’re going to be in this world. How do you navigate that?

Ks: I’m so lucky. I have people who listen. I’m in a very lucky place.

W&H: It’s interesting because I live in New York, and I write about feminism and Hollywood. I’m always a bit shocked when I come to a place like this or go to La and see the machinery behind it all.

That’s something that you live through. You seem like an incredibly happy, lovely human being. I don’t know you, but people weirdly think they know you. How do you keep your own identity and yet give people what they need to promote your movies?

Ks: Right now it’s strange because I’m not working for anyone. I’m less nervous here because I’m not overtly concerned about representing a director and the way he wants a story to be spoken about.

W&H: Because the director is you.

Ks: Yeah. That’s a trip, and that’s fucking amazing. I had to sort of relinquish the notion that you can control the way people see you. You can’t. When you try to, you start becoming oddly and ironically disingenuous because you want others to think a certain thing.

Honestly, you literally just have to be protective — but not guarded — and be honest about what you care about and what you don’t.

I can talk to you because this is a conversation — but I have to abandon the idea that anyone is going to read this, because then you start thinking about what it will sound like to everyone else. This conversation can exist right here and people can read it for what it is, but addressing the world at large is [overwhelming]. I don’t think about it. I just try to have individual conversations with people, and when I don’t have to do press, I work.

W&H: So, you probably get tons and tons of scripts, and you’ve made such interesting decisions. I loved “Clouds of Sils Maria.” What a great movie. Talk a little bit about how you make your acting choices.

Ks: It’s always really instinctive. I never know what I’m going to be doing. There may be a subject I want to explore, but that’s typically as a filmmaker rather than an actor.

As an actor, I want to read something and feel like it lives so fully that I need to preserve that life. It’s hard for me to develop projects with people because it needs to preexist in me in order for me to honor it.

W&H: Are you interested in producing as well then?

Ks: No. That’s the last thing I want to do. I hate development meetings. If a character doesn’t exist yet, I of course would be interested in writing and directing that project. But, I don’t know if I could necessarily act in something like that because I’d know it’s a farce — I’d know that I made it up.

I need to feel like a character literally existed, like I’m reading a history book and people need to know this story.

W&H: So, you had a lot of female crew members on this. Was that something that you wanted, or were they just the best people for the job?

Ks: To be honest, they were the best people for the job. It wasn’t totally intentional. But, I think if I had a fully male crew, I would have noticed and done something to fix that.

https://medium.com/media/400807fd969602d97c18f2700b92671d/href

Cannes Interview: Kristen Stewart Explains Why Directing Shouldn’t Be About Correcting was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Kristen Stewart on her directing debut: 'The best female film-makers are compulsive freaks'

The Twilight actor is at Cannes to show Come Swim, her film about heartbreak starring a man who can’t quench his thirst

In a suite at the Hotel Majestic Barrière in Cannes, every surface heaves with haute couture. Chanel dresses spun from gossamer threads are draped along the walls and chunky, diamond-studded bracelets are scattered across the dresser. Only the suite’s occupant doesn’t seem to have received the memo. Kristen Stewart, dressed in a vest and black cargo pants, her hair in a blond crop, looks almost defiantly out of place.

But Stewart is not quite the incongruous presence she might seem at the festival. In 2014, she became the first female American actor in 30 years to win a Cesar, for best supporting actress in Olivier Assayas’s Clouds of Sils Maria. More recently, there was her bewitchingly odd performance in Personal Shopper, Assayas’s strange, sad, ruminative ghost story.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Kristen Stewart Hits the Cannes Red Carpet in Appropriately Edgy Look

Kristen Stewart Hits the Cannes Red Carpet in Appropriately Edgy Look
Kristen Stewart is never boring on red carpets.

On Saturday, the actress stepped out for the Cannes Film Festival premiere of her directorial debut, Come Swim, wearing a getup as unique as she is. Stewart chose a long, gray-patterned skirt with suspenders and a peach bandeaux on top. The actress paired her look with a striking smokey eye that contrasted against her bleach blonde shaved head.

Stewart topped off the look with strappy black heels — and the actress had a lot to say about the required footwear in an interview shortly before hitting the carpet. Stewart spoke with The Hollywood
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Will Smith Brings Star Power to Cannes and Defends Netflix’s Place at the Festival

Will Smith Brings Star Power to Cannes and Defends Netflix’s Place at the Festival
Bonjour, Monsieur Smith.

Will Smith injected some star power to the opening night of the 70th Cannes Film Festival, greeting fans gathered in the Côte d’Azur on Wednesday.

Looking dashing in black tux, Smith joked about his hometown to a group of festival goers, saying, “West Philadelphia is a long way from Cannes.”

Smith is a member of this year’s festival jury, which also includes Jessica Chastain, Paolo Sorrentino and Park Chan-wook.

Also supplying the star power on Wednesday was Marion Cotillard, who stars alongside Charlotte Gainsbourg in French director Arnaud Desplechin’s Ismael’s Ghosts, which premiere on opening night.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Matrix Star Monica Bellucci Kicks Off Cannes Film Festival with a Very French Make-Out Session

So that’s how they kick off award shows in France!

Matrix star Monica Bellucci, who’s serving as Master of Ceremonies at the 70th annual Cannes Film Festival, showed off her seduction skills with a gag during the festival’s opening ceremony Wednesday evening.

The Italian model and actress, 52, surprised the audience at the Palais des Festivals et des Congrès by having a steamy, faux make-out session with her co-host, French comedian Alex Lutz.

Wearing a flowing, semi-sheer black Dior gown, the former Bond girl grabbed a handful of the comedian’s hair as she pushed his face toward her own before locking lips.
See full article at PEOPLE.com »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites