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NYC Weekend Watch: Outsider Visions of America, Godard x Pasolini, Lucrecia Martel & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film at Lincoln Center

“Another Country: Outsider Visions of America” offers films by Raúl Ruiz, Straub-Huillet, Wenders, Verhoeven and more.

Eternal Sunshine plays for free Friday night on Governor’s Island.

IFC Center

The rather staggering Abbas Kiarostami retrospective continues, with screenings of the Koker trilogy, Ten, Taste of Cherry, Certified Copy and more.



Metrograph
See full article at The Film Stage »

Iowa’s ‘Field Of Dreams’ Field To Host Real White Sox-Yankees Game

  • Deadline
Major League Baseball said Thursday that the New York Yankees and Chicago White Sox will play a regular-season game next season at the site of the baseball field in Dyersville, Iowa, made famous in the 1989 movie Field of Dreams.

The league begins construction next week on a temporary 8,000-seat stadium on the site, which has been a tourist attraction from the moment Ray Liotta’s “Shoeless” Joe Jackson asked Kevin Costner’s Ray Kinsella in the movie if the baseball field he built in a cornfield was heaven. “No,” Kinsella tells him, “it’s Iowa.”

The film, based on a W.P. Kinsella novel, centers on Costner’s Ray, a struggling transplanted farmer in modern-day Iowa who heeds a voice in his head to plow under his corn crop to build a baseball field. It later is visited by the scandal-ridden 1919 White Sox — part of a larger theme in which Ray
See full article at Deadline »

NYC Weekend Watch: Outsider Visions of America, Koker Trilogy, ‘Joan the Maid’ & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film at Lincoln Center

“Another Country: Outsider Visions of America” offers films by Demy, Resnais, Antonioni, Varda and more.

IFC Center

The rather staggering Abbas Kiarostami retrospective continues, with screenings of the Koker trilogy and more.



Quad Cinema

Jacques Rivette’s masterpiece Joan the Maid has begun screening in a fantastic-looking 4K restoration.

Metrograph

Written by Paul and Leonard Schrader,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Film Review: ‘Coyote Lake’

  • Variety
Film Review: ‘Coyote Lake’
United States-Mexico border politics are such a minefield at present, you have to marvel at the chutzpah — or simple obliviousness — it takes to make something like “Coyote Lake,” which superficially deploys those issues for the purposes of irrelevant, implausible melodrama. After directing several shorts (and years of work as a production assistant on shows such as “The Mindy Project” and “American Crime Story”), Sara Seligman makes her feature debut with a sluggish mix of thriller and drama that lacks the suspense required in one department and the depth needed on the other. Too flat-footedly earnest even to provide inadvertent bad-movie fun, it opens on five theatrical screens (two in Texas) simultaneous with On Demand launch this Friday. Enthusiasm will be scant.

We first meet teenaged Ester (“Riverdale’s” Camila Mendes) and her much-older mother Teresa (Adriana Barraza) as they’re sharing a seemingly innocuous dinner in their isolated farmhouse with an overnight room-renter.
See full article at Variety »

Rushes: New Jia Zhangke, Christopher Doyle Discusses "Chungking Express," Simba vs. Kimba

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSJia Zhangke on the set of So Close to My LandThe latest from Jia Zhangke film is entitled So Close to My Land, an eight-chapter documentary that follows "esteemed Chinese writers Jia Pingwa, Yu Hua and Liang Hong" across four provinces. Jia also notes that the film is "an Eisenstein-styled film, with great subjective influence." Russian Ark filmmaker Aleksandr Sokurov has announced that he is shutting down his film foundation Primer Inotnatsii, which supports young Russian filmmakers, in response to pressure from Russia's culture ministry and a lack of funding. The organization helped producer Kantemir Balagov's Closeness, which Mubi premiered in May.Recommended VIEWINGThe first trailer for Takashi Miike's First Love, which follows an orphaned boxer caught in a turf war between Japanese yakuza and Chinese gangs. Read editor Daniel Kasman's review of the film here.
See full article at MUBI »

Movie Poster of the Week: The Real and Fake Posters for “Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood”

Above: Prop poster for Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood by Renato Casaro.When the first poster was released in March for Quentin Tarantino’s much-anticipated Once Upon a Time... in Hollywood, which opens in theaters today, people were generally not impressed. And rightly so: a poorly composed, awkwardly Photoshopped image of Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio leaning against the edges of the poster frame, with a car and the Hollywood sign in the background, it looked like it had been knocked off in a rush for the Cannes Film Festival and would inevitably be replaced closer to the release date with something much better. And eventually an illustrated retro-style poster was released that was a vast improvement. But the Photoshopped version has endured, with a number of variations released in the interim. And it seems that both styles, or either one or the other, are now in theaters. The illustrated poster,
See full article at MUBI »

NYC Weekend Watch: Machiko Kyō, Abbas Kiarostami, Godzilla & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Metrograph

Films by Mizoguchi, Kurosawa, and Naruse kick off a retrospective of Japanese actress Machiko Kyō.

The Pasolini retrospective continues.

Streetwise and its follow-up, Tiny: The Life of Erin Blackwell, begin a run.

The restoration of A Bigger Splash continues screening, while the ’90s indie film Chalk has been restored.

Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!
See full article at The Film Stage »

Once Upon a Time in Rome

A significant subplot of Quentin Tarantino's ninth feature, Once Upon a Time in... Hollywood, involves the offer of work to fading movie stars from the Italian film business, where a few got lucky and reinvigorated their careers and others merely paid the rent or tarnished their reputations, if any.This notion is certainly not one of Q.T.'s notorious counter-historical plot turns: Italy had been offering opportunities to Hollywood and European flotsam since the fifties.In the era of Il Boom, the post-war economic miracle, filmmakers, including actors, were offered a great deal: they could live and work in Italy tax-free for a year. Projects were not only re-written to take advantage of this possibility, they were conceived for it: it's uncertain Roman Holiday would exist without the big tax break incentive.For actors, there was clearly another consideration, beyond the big, or at least tax-exempt, bucks and
See full article at MUBI »

Body Politics: Burt Lancaster and "The Swimmer"

Burt Lancaster in Frank and Eleanor Perry's The Swimmer (1968), based upon the John Cheever short story. Courtesy of Film Forum.For decades, film critics and academics interested in the classical Hollywood cinema have been dutifully studying the canonized big stars—Cary Grant, Garbo, the Hepburns, Bogart and Bacall, Dietrich and Crawford and Monroe—while downplaying one of the most highly varied and fascinating careers of any studio actor: Burt Lancaster. Now, New York’s Film Forum is giving us a great excuse to revisit this actor’s towering body of work—emphasis on “body.” From big-name classics like Louis Malle’s Atlantic City (1980) and John Frankenheimer’s Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) to little-known masterpieces like Carol Reed’s Trapeze (1956) and Luchino Visconti’s late decadent chamber drama Conversation Piece (1974), a meaty, healthy range of Burt is on display for the next four weeks, between July 19 to August 15.Serious film talk
See full article at MUBI »

Movie Poster of the Week: Burt Lancaster in Posters

Above: Italian 4-fogli for Birdman of Alcatraz. Artist: Renato Casaro.Starting today with a week-long run of Robert Siodmak’s The Killers, New York’s Film Forum is hosting a 4-week, 37-film retrospective of one of the great he-men of Hollywood. With his square jaw, gymnast’s physique, and megawatt grin, Burt Lancaster (1913–1994) must have been a boon to movie poster artists and over the years he was drawn or painted by many great affichistes. I could have curated a post on just the Italian renditions of Lancaster alone: over the years he was painted by Ercole Brini, Anselmo Ballester, Luigi Martinati, Renato Casaro, Averardo Ciriello, and many more. To mark the retrospective I have selected 50 of my favorite illustrated images of the indelible star, from his brooding film noir youth (though he was actually 33 when he made his debut in The Killers), through his serious thespian mid-period to his
See full article at MUBI »

NYC Weekend Watch: 21st-Century Debuts, Barbara Hammer, Burt Lancaster & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film at Lincoln Center

A retrospective of 21st-century debuts is underway, with two-for-one packages doubling some of today’s best working filmmakers.

A free screening of Martin Scorsese’s After Hours is held at Governor’s Island tonight.

A Bigger Splash has screenings.

Museum of the Moving Image

The expressively named “Barbara Hammer, Superdyke” looks
See full article at The Film Stage »

Seven Things We Didn’t Learn in CNN’s Breezy Clip-Fest ‘The Movies: The Eighties’

Seven Things We Didn’t Learn in CNN’s Breezy Clip-Fest ‘The Movies: The Eighties’
CNN premiered the first episode in Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman’s six-part summer series “The Movies” Sunday night, 84 minutes devoted to the 1980s. Subsequent installments cover the 90s and post-2000 and then turn back to the 70s, 60s, and the bulk of core film history — 1930-1950 — crammed into the finale. Silent film, it seems, was not worth a mention.

First of all, this series is not targeted at erudite cinephiles who know their film history. Any self-respecting TCM watcher is too sophisticated for this breezy look at “The Movies.” Clearly the producers are trying to draw younger audiences who might be vaguely familiar with some of the movies here, from Steven Spielberg’s “E.T.” to Martin Scorsese’s “Raging Bull.” (Both directors are on hand to comment.) Snobby old Hollywood lovers sometimes forget that for today’s 18-year-old film fan devouring classic films made before they were born,
See full article at Indiewire »

Martin Sheen To Narrate Documentary On JFK Death Probe From Original Oswald Investigator

  • Deadline
Martin Sheen To Narrate Documentary On JFK Death Probe From Original Oswald Investigator
Exclusive: Martin Sheen to is on board to narrate Rush to Judgment II, an update to the 1967 version, Rush to Judgment, which is being executive produced by Stephen S. Jaffe. He is a former staff investigator and last surviving member of the legal team run by New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison who led a probe into the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

The original Emile de Antonio-directed documentary was based on the New York Times best-selling novel Rush to Judgment by attorney Mark Lane, in which he takes issue with the Kennedy investigation and exposes serious flaws in the conclusions made by the Warren Commission. Lane, died in 2016, will be credited posthumously as an executive producer.

The contemporary documentary, which will be produced by Dylan Howard via his Topixly label, aims to uncover the conspiracy of powerful men that resulted in the assassination of President Kennedy and
See full article at Deadline »

Emmy spotlight: Christine Baranski punches back and then some on Season 3 of CBS’ ‘The Good Fight’

Emmy spotlight: Christine Baranski punches back and then some on Season 3 of CBS’ ‘The Good Fight’
I am among the watchers of all seven seasons of “The Good Wife” who believe that its CBS All Access web spin-off, ‘The Good Fight,’ has grown even better than the original. As much as I enjoyed Julianna Margulies as Alicia Florrick, who worked her way up from junior litigator to being a partner at a law firm over the years, her love life’s ups and downs with her cheating politician husband and her college-crush co-worker were often exhausting.

The character’s travails and triumphs often overshadowed that of Christine Baranski’s Diane Lockhart, a highly regarded legal mind who would become a mentor to her, one who stood up for liberal principles and women’s rights. One of the best storylines that happened to Diane was when she fell for Kurt McVeigh, a firearms expert and conservative Republican played with manly silver-fox elan by Gary Cole.

See‘The Good Fight
See full article at Gold Derby »

Father’s Day at the Movies: Field Of Dreams Returns to Theaters June 16th & 18th

A disembodied voice whispers to farmer Ray Kinsella (Kevin Costner) and begins a classic film fantasy about fathers, sons, baseball and the power of unwavering belief in Field of Dreams, which marks its 30th anniversary by returning to movie theaters for two days only: on Father’s Day and Tuesday, June 18.

Field of Dreams returns to movie theaters a century after the Chicago “Black Sox” scandal that plagued baseball and that fascinates Ray Kinsella as he undertakes an extraordinary gamble before setting off on a journey that connects him with three unlikely allies: reclusive author Terence Mann (James Earl Jones), baseball player Archibald “Moonlight” Graham (Burt Lancaster) and “Shoeless Joe” Jackson himself (Ray Liotta). With the support of his wife (Amy Madigan), Ray discovers the importance of long-sought forgiveness in director Phil Alden Robinson’s film, which has become synonymous with baseball.

Before and after each presentation of Field of Dreams,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Tony Curtis movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Sweet Smell of Success,’ ‘Some Like It Hot,’ ‘Spartacus’

  • Gold Derby
Tony Curtis movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Sweet Smell of Success,’ ‘Some Like It Hot,’ ‘Spartacus’
Tony Curtis would’ve celebrated his 94th birthday on June 3, 2019. The Oscar-nominated performer starred in dozens of movies throughout his career, becoming famous as the charismatic leading man of romantic comedies, action films, and prestige dramas. But how many of his titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1925 in The Bronx, New York, Curtis got his start in movies thanks mainly to his good looks. He first gained attention as a serious actor thanks to Alexander Mackendrick‘s searing drama “Sweet Smell of Success” (1957), in which he played an unscrupulous publicist who agrees to do the bidding of an amoral Broadway critic (Burt Lancaster). The film brought him a BAFTA nomination as Best Actor.

SEEBurt Lancaster movies: 20 greatest films ranked worst to best

He earned his one and only Oscar bid the
See full article at Gold Derby »

Tony Curtis movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Tony Curtis movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Tony Curtis would’ve celebrated his 94th birthday on June 3, 2019. The Oscar-nominated performer starred in dozens of movies throughout his career, becoming famous as the charismatic leading man of romantic comedies, action films, and prestige dramas. But how many of his titles remain classics? In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1925 in The Bronx, New York, Curtis got his start in movies thanks mainly to his good looks. He first gained attention as a serious actor thanks to Alexander Mackendrick‘s searing drama “Sweet Smell of Success” (1957), in which he played an unscrupulous publicist who agrees to do the bidding of an amoral Broadway critic (Burt Lancaster). The film brought him a BAFTA nomination as Best Actor.

He earned his one and only Oscar bid the following year as Best Actor for Stanley Kramer‘s
See full article at Gold Derby »

See Dirty Harry Sunday Night June 9th at the Sky View Drive-in in Lichtfield, Illinois

Dirty Harry Sunday Night June 9th at the Sky View Drive-in in Lichtfield, Il. (1500 Historic Old Route 66) This is part of the Sky View’s ‘Throwback Sundays’. The second Sunday of the month, they screen a classic movie. Admission is only $3 (free for kids under 5). The movie starts at dusk (8:30-ish). The Sky View’s site can be found Here. Next month, July 14th, is Goonies!

You’ve got to ask yourself a question: ‘do I feel lucky?’ Well, do ya, punk?” Clint Eastwood muttered his most famous line in Dirty Harry, starring as Harry Callahan, the hard-working San Francisco cop who can’t finish his lunch without having to stop a bank robbery with his 44 Magnum (“the most powerful handgun in the world”). Harry must take the law into his own hands when a psychotic killer is released on a technicality and the cat and mouse play between
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Marisa Tomei Headed To Broadway For Tennessee Williams’ ‘The Rose Tattoo’ Revival

Marisa Tomei Headed To Broadway For Tennessee Williams’ ‘The Rose Tattoo’ Revival
Marisa Tomei will star in a Broadway revival of Tennessee WilliamsThe Rose Tattoo, to be directed by Trip Cullman and set for a Roundabout Theatre Company production in September.

Tomei will play Serafina, the widow “who rekindles her desire for love, lust and life in the arms of a fiery suitor,” in the description by Roundabout. Other casting — including that fiery suitor — hasn’t been announced.

The Rose Tattoo will begin previews on September 19, with an official opening on Tuesday, October 15. The limited engagement will run through December 8 at the nonprofit Roundabout’s Broadway venue American Airlines Theatre.

Cullman and Tomei premiered the revival at the Williamstown Theatre Festival in June 2016.

The play made its Tony-winning Broadway debut in 1951, starring Maureen Stapleton and Eli Wallach. A movie version was released in 1955 starring Anna Magnani and Burt Lancaster, and a 1995 Broadway revival at Circle in the Square starred Mercedes Ruehl and Anthony Lapaglia.
See full article at Deadline »

‘The Crown’s Claire Foy & Matt Smith To Reunite On Stage In The Old Vic’s Environmental Play ‘Lungs’

‘The Crown’s Claire Foy & Matt Smith To Reunite On Stage In The Old Vic’s Environmental Play ‘Lungs’
The Crown’s Claire Foy and Matt Smith are reuniting after their royal outing – this time on stage at London’s The Old Vic Theatre.

The pair are set to star in Duncan Macmillan’s Lungs, an “emotional environmental rollercoaster”. The play, which is directed by The Old Vic’s Artistic Director Matthew Warchus, who previously directed Broadway musical Matilda, is set around the melting ice caps, overpopulation and political unrest as they bring a baby into the world.

“Hot on the heels of the Extinction Rebellion consciousness-raising demonstrations, there’s an extremely limited run of Duncan Macmillan’s dazzlingly vibrant and profound two-hander, Lungs, which sees a conflicted couple wrestle with huge contemporary dilemmas surrounding the responsibility of bringing new life into an increasingly precarious world,” said Warchus.

Elsewhere, The Good Wife’s Alan Cumming and Harry Potter star Daniel Radcliffe, who is currently featuring in TBS comedy Miracle Workers,
See full article at Deadline »
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