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Flying Lotus, Denzel Curry Complete Trilogy With ‘Black Balloons Reprise’

Flying Lotus and Denzel Curry have teamed to complete the latter’s “Black Balloons” song trilogy with “Black Balloons Reprise,” set to appear on FlyLo’s new album, Flamagra, out May 24th via Warp.

On Twitter, Curry wrote, “The trilogy is complete,” acknowledging the song’s place among his two TA1300 tracks “Black Balloons” and “The Blackest Balloon.” Like those cuts, “Black Balloons Reprise” finds Curry painting a vivid portrait of depression and pessimism as he spits, “The day the black balloon explodes, we all die/Nobody couldn’t handle the truth,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

David Lynch and Russell Brand In Conversation

The David Lynch Foundation will be hosting a special in-conversation event, bringing together Russell Brand and David Lynch to raise the funds necessary to bring meditation to the women in recovery from addiction at Friendly House in La.

The event will take place at the Fonda Theatre at 7:00pm on June 9 for 90 minutes of questions about consciousness, creativity, film, art, comedy, the brain, and more.

To celebrate and honor Brand’s work in the field of recovery, the David Lynch Foundation will present Russell with its first annual “Freedom From Addiction Award.” Brand is the bestselling author of Recovery: Freedom from Our Addictions, which addresses his 14-year battle with heroin addiction and his journey towards recovery, including his 12-year meditation practice.

Click here for tickets.

Established in 2005, the David Lynch Foundation’s incredible mission is to reduce toxic stress and trauma among at-risk populations through the evidence-based Transcendental Meditation technique.
See full article at Look to the Stars »

Let’s Get Weird! Cinematic Oddities

Tom Jolliffe looks at the weird wonders of cinema…

There are pretty standard films when it comes to cinema. It could be straight horror (masked killer stalks teens) or Die Hard formula. Sometimes a film lowdown tells you everything you need to know about what you’re about to watch. To an extent this brings comfort to cinema goers. Look at the Top 100 highest grossing films and you’d be hard pressed to find anything hugely unconventional.

Of course you can have alien characters in strange alien worlds, but it’s still told in a conventional way. Star Wars for instance which at its core is pure, Kurosawa infused Samurai cinema or a film like Guardians of the Galaxy despite its talking raccoons and Groot, is a recognisable adventure formula. However, sometimes a film defies explanation, logic or understanding. Look at David Lynch’s career. He’s made a name
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘The Lighthouse’ Ignites Cannes, Along With Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe Oscar Talk

‘The Lighthouse’ Ignites Cannes, Along With Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe Oscar Talk
It’s no surprise that psycho-thriller “The Lighthouse,” Robert Eggers’ dazzling follow-up to art-horror smash “The Witch,” should play well for Americans at Cannes. But it also played well on Sunday for two sets of turnaway international crowds who had to line up hours early to get into the Directors’ Fortnight entry, which could win a prize.

Rob Pattinson and Willem Dafoe go toe-to-toe in Eggers’ claustrophobic, Herman Melville-inspired two-hander, shot with black-and-white 35mm film and in Academy ratio. Filmed in stormy weather in Nova Scotia, the Quinzaine entry should yield another arthouse hit for A24. Their eventual date will reveal something about the distributor’s awards plans.

The Lighthouse” is something of a hybrid, which may be why it wound up in the Quinzaine, which is a strong Cannes platform for edgy indie fare like “The Florida Project,” among many other films, as opposed to the main Competition.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

‘The Lighthouse’ Ignites Cannes, Along With Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe Oscar Talk

‘The Lighthouse’ Ignites Cannes, Along With Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe Oscar Talk
It’s no surprise that psycho-thriller “The Lighthouse,” Robert Eggers’ dazzling follow-up to art-horror smash “The Witch,” should play well for Americans at Cannes. But it also played well on Sunday for two sets of turnaway international crowds who had to line up hours early to get into the Directors’ Fortnight entry, which could win a prize.

Rob Pattinson and Willem Dafoe go toe-to-toe in Eggers’ claustrophobic, Herman Melville-inspired two-hander, shot with black-and-white 35mm film and in Academy ratio. Filmed in stormy weather in Nova Scotia, the Quinzaine entry should yield another arthouse hit for A24. Their eventual date will reveal something about the distributor’s awards plans.

The Lighthouse” is something of a hybrid, which may be why it wound up in the Quinzaine, which is a strong Cannes platform for edgy indie fare like “The Florida Project,” among many other films, as opposed to the main Competition.
See full article at Indiewire »

‘Star Wars’ Team on Creating Chewbacca, Wookiee Noises in ‘The Art of Cinematic Sound’

  • Variety
‘Star Wars’ Team on Creating Chewbacca, Wookiee Noises in ‘The Art of Cinematic Sound’
“I knew the sound was part of the foundation of what the movie was going to be,” George Lucas explains in this exclusive clip from Midge Costin’s “Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound.” Ben Burtt, sound designer on “Star Wars,” goes on to explain how the team originally created the legendary sounds used for Chewbacca and the wookiees in the franchise.

The trick, he says in the clip, was spending time with a young bear and using bread to coax the sounds from the animal. The words from the film team, also including sound editor Richard Anderson, mesh with footage of Han Solo talking to Chewbacca. Peter Mayhew, who played the iconic wookiee, died in April.

Making Waves: The Art of Cinematic Sound” premiered in the Cannes Classics documentary section. It takes a historical journey through sound design within cinema from its early beginnings to modern-day blockbuster films,
See full article at Variety »

‘Too Old to Die Young’ Review: Miles Teller Embraces Slow Nihilism in Nicolas Winding Refn Series

‘Too Old to Die Young’ Review: Miles Teller Embraces Slow Nihilism in Nicolas Winding Refn Series
The genre of violence for its own sake has been deeply explored in American cinema over the past 50 years, and adopted for better or worse by the most stylish of filmmakers who have followed in the footsteps of Martin Scorsese, David Lynch and Quentin Tarantino.

But at this stage, it’s fair to ask what is the point when a talented filmmaker like Nicolas Winding Refn delivers an indulgent dive into nihilistic violence in “Too Old to Die Young,” an Amazon 10-part TV series whose first two episodes screened out of competition at the Cannes Film Festival this weekend?

What are we discovering here? Miles Teller plays Martin, a cop turned contract killer with a suitably chiseled profile but no discernible motivation for blithely shooting random people from the criminal underworld for pay.

Also Read: Miles Teller Plays a Cop Turned Bad in 'Too Old to Die Young'
See full article at The Wrap »

In Era Where Netflix Is Sidelined At Cannes, Nicolas Winding Refn Champions Streaming At Premiere Of His Amazon Series ‘Too Old To Die Young’

  • Deadline
In Era Where Netflix Is Sidelined At Cannes, Nicolas Winding Refn Champions Streaming At Premiere Of His Amazon Series ‘Too Old To Die Young’
Three years after director Nicolas Winding Refn defended the theatrical experience before exhibitors at CinemaCon 2016, tonight at the Cannes premiere of his Amazon series Too Old To Die Young, the Danish filmmaker expressed his love for streaming before a packed house in the Grand Lumiere Theatre. Refn made these remarks following a roughly four-minute standing ovation for the series, of which episodes 4 and 5 were shown. Too Old To Die Young will stream on Amazon Prime on June 14.

Said Refn:

“Today is year zero. The idea that streaming is a new canvas around us, it’s part of the digital revolution and it flows 24 hours a day, seven days a week, if we can just tap into it and experience creativity. And it’s for everyone. And this show represents the opportunities that can be done in the digital revolution of technology. I suddenly had this opportunity. My wife’s biological father is Fritz Lang,
See full article at Deadline »

‘Little Joe’ Film Review: Cannes Gets a Horticultural Horror Flick

‘Little Joe’ Film Review: Cannes Gets a Horticultural Horror Flick
“Fear can affect our perception of reality,” says an inquisitive shrink about halfway through “Little Joe,” Jessica Hausner’s highbrow horticulture horror flick (say that three times fast) that premiered in the main competition at the Cannes Film Festival on Friday. And if that observation might be the case for the beleaguered mother at the center of this sci-fi head-trip, it is entirely the other way around when describing Hausner’s intentions.

With her English language debut, the Austrian filmmaker has channeled her perceptions of fear, taking a common reality — that which parents face when their kids reach adolescence – and refracting the myriad anxieties and uncertainties of that stage of life as a gonzo genre freak-out.

Repurposing parental anxieties into psychological horror, “Little Joe” offers kind of thematic follow-up to David Lynch’s “Eraserhead” – only now the terror doesn’t come from an alien figure that requires constant care and attention,
See full article at The Wrap »

Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Blue Velvet,’ ‘Easy Rider,’ ‘Hoosiers’

  • Gold Derby
Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘Blue Velvet,’ ‘Easy Rider,’ ‘Hoosiers’
Dennis Hopper would’ve celebrated his 83rd birthday on May 17, 2019. The Oscar-nominated performer experienced many ups-and-downs throughout his career, with his off-screen antics often overshadowing his onscreen talent. Yet many of his movies have stood the test of time. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of Hopper’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1936, Hopper made his movie debut at the age of 19 in “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955), where he became fast friends with James Dean. He had an even bigger role in “Giant” (1956), which would be Dean’s last film before his untimely death in 1955. Hopper struggled for several years trying to find his voice, making small appearances in such films as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967) and “True Grit”(1969).

SEERock Hudson movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

He burst onto the scene with the counterculture phenomenon “Easy Rider” (1969), which he also
See full article at Gold Derby »

Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Dennis Hopper movies: 15 greatest films ranked worst to best
Dennis Hopper would’ve celebrated his 83rd birthday on May 17, 2019. The Oscar-nominated performer experienced many ups-and-downs throughout his career, with his off-screen antics often overshadowing his onscreen talent. Yet many of his movies have stood the test of time. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 15 of Hopper’s greatest films, ranked worst to best.

Born in 1936, Hopper made his movie debut at the age of 19 in “Rebel Without a Cause” (1955), where he became fast friends with James Dean. He had an even bigger role in “Giant” (1956), which would be Dean’s last film before his untimely death in 1955. Hopper struggled for several years trying to find his voice, making small appearances in such films as “Cool Hand Luke” (1967) and “True Grit”(1969).

He burst onto the scene with the counterculture phenomenon “Easy Rider” (1969), which he also directed and co-wrote (with co-star Peter Fonda and Terry Southern
See full article at Gold Derby »

Jim Sturgess mystery 'The Other Me' joins Cmg Cannes sales slate (exclusive)

Jim Sturgess mystery 'The Other Me' joins Cmg Cannes sales slate (exclusive)
Production has begun in Tbilisi, Georgia.

Jim Sturgess will play an architect who can see people’s true motives in mystery The Other Me, which Cinema Management Group has launched in Cannes with David Lynch on board as executive producer.

Production has begun in Tbilisi, Georgia, on the project from writer-director Giga Agladze about an aspiring architect who is diagnosed with a debilitating eye disease that enables him to enter a surreal version of reality in which he can see people’s true motives.

As the visions become intolerable, the man falls for a mysterious woman and confronts the truth about his own identity.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Film Independent Names Jacqueline Lyanga As Artistic Director

Film Independent has pulled back the curtain on its new artistic director. Former longtime AFI Fest director Jacqueline Lyanga will oversee re-envisioning and expanding the organization’s year-round film, TV and new media programming.

In addition to programming Film Independent Presents, the year-round screening series supported by Hollywood Foreign Press Association, Lyanga will curate The Portal, a showcase of Vr and immersive storytelling, produced in partnership with Loyola Marymount University School of Film and Television at the new Lmu Playa Vista Campus in September. She also will build out additional programming throughout the year and across the city of Los Angeles.

Lyanga will play a key role in programming the Global Inclusion Summit, a fall conference focused on issues of diversity and representation in the U.S. film industry and internationally. She began her collaboration with Film Independent last year as La Film Festival Guest Director, Vr and Immersive Storytelling.
See full article at Deadline »

Former AFI Fest Director Jacqueline Lyanga Joins Film Independent as Artistic Director

Former AFI Fest director Jacqueline Lyanga has made her newest collaboration official, thanks to a big new role at Los Angeles’ own Film Independent. Lyanga has joined the organization as its Artistic Director, a role that will require her to “oversee re-envisioning and expanding the organization’s year-round film, television, and new media programming.” After departing her AFI Fest post in June 2018, Lyanga joined Film Independent as guest director of Vr and Immersive Storytelling for its Los Angeles Film Festival. Upon the conclusion of its 2018 edition, Laff announced that it was ending and would turn its focus to year-round events.

Per an official press release, Lyanga will also program Film Independent Presents (the year-round screening series supported by Lead Sponsor Hollywood Foreign Press Association), curate The Portal, and will build out additional programming throughout the year and across the city of Los Angeles.

She will also play a key role
See full article at Indiewire »

Former AFI Fest director Jacqueline Lyanga named Film Independent artistic director

Industry veteran recently made knight of the Order of Art And Letters.

Former AFI Fest director Jacqueline Lyanga has joined Film Independent as artistic director where she will be tasked with revitalising the year-round film, television and new media programme.

Lyanga, who was recently made a knight of the Order of Art And Letters by the French government, will also curate The Portal, a showcase of Vr and immersive storytelling produced in partnership with Loyola Marymount University School of Film and Television that runs at the school’s Los Angeles campus from September 20-22.

Lyanga will oversee the expansion of
See full article at ScreenDaily »

See Flying Lotus and Anderson .Paak’s New Sci-Fi Video for ‘More’

See Flying Lotus and Anderson .Paak’s New Sci-Fi Video for ‘More’
Following the release of Flying Lotus’ new Flamagra track “More” featuring Anderson .Paak earlier this week, the musicians have shared an animated visual to go along with it.

The psychedelic sci-fi video from Cowboy Bebop director Shinichiro Watanabe features .Paak as a robot DJ and Flying Lotus as a doomed space man who becomes a burning tree made of his own body parts.

Watanabe and FlyLo previously collaborated on the anime short film Blade Runner 2049: Black Out 2022. They are set to work together again on the upcoming anime series Carole & Tuesday.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Peggy Lipton, star of TV landmarks ‘Mod Squad’ and ‘Twin Peaks, dead at 72

As leggy and lithesome flower girl and undercover cop Julie Barnes on ABC’s “The Mod Squad,” Peggy Lipton, who is dead on age 72 from cancer on May 11, became a counter-cultural sex symbol alongside actors Michael Cole as long-haired Pete Cochran and Clarence Williams III as African-American Lincoln Hayes. The catchphrase for the series that lasted five seasons from 1968 to 1973, “One black, one white, one blonde,” might sound corny these days, but it was one of the first network shows to feature an integrated cast that also reflected the times were a-changing by tackling cases with social issues and using the cool jargon of the day.

Check out the clip above featuring a “Mod Squad” scene between Cole and Lipton.

As often was the case back in the ’60s, Lipton would cash in on her TV popularity by recording a self-titled album in 1968, tackling such tunes as Donovan‘s “Wear
See full article at Gold Derby »

Peggy Lipton of ‘Twin Peaks’ and ‘The Mod Squad’ Dies at 72

Peggy Lipton of ‘Twin Peaks’ and ‘The Mod Squad’ Dies at 72
Peggy Lipton, who came to fame on “The Mod Squad” before serving as a lovesick waitress on both iterations of “Twin Peaks,” has died. She was 72. The actress, who was also the mother of fellow thespian Rashida Jones, passed away from cancer.

“She made her journey peacefully with her daughters and nieces by her side,” announced Jones and her sister Kidada in a statement to the Los Angeles Times. “We feel so lucky for every moment we spent with her. “We can’t put all of our feelings into words right now, but we will say: Peggy was and will always be our beacon of light, both in this world and beyond. She will always be a part of us.” Lipton was married to music producer Quincy Jones, about whom his daughter Rashida recently made a documentary, from 1974 until 1989.

Born August 30, 1946 in New York, Lipton started her career as a
See full article at Indiewire »

Peggy Lipton, ‘Twin Peaks’ and ‘The Mod Squad’ Actress, Dead at 72

Peggy Lipton, ‘Twin Peaks’ and ‘The Mod Squad’ Actress, Dead at 72
Peggy Lipton, the model and actress who starred on The Mod Squad and Twin Peaks, has died at the age of 72 after a battle with cancer.

Rashida and Kidida Jones, Lipton’s daughters from her marriage to music producer Quincy Jones, confirmed their mother’s death in a statement to the Los Angeles Times.

“She made her journey peacefully with her daughters and nieces by her side,” Lipton’s daughters. “We feel so lucky for every moment we spent with her.”

Lipton, who as a 15-year-old became a Ford Agency model,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Peggy Lipton: Twin Peaks and The Mod Squad star dies aged 72

Actor shot to fame in the 1960s playing a hippie undercover cop and returning to television with David Lynch’s cult series

Peggy Lipton, a star of the groundbreaking late 1960s TV show The Mod Squad and the 1990s show Twin Peaks, has died of cancer aged 72.

Lipton died surrounded by her family, her daughters, Rashida and Kidada Jones, said in a statement.

Related: Fire Walk With Me: how David Lynch's film went from laughing stock to the key to Twin Peaks
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »
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