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Beauty vs Beast: I Ain't Sayin' He's a Gold Digger

Jason Adams of Mnpp here with another round of "Beauty vs Beast" silliness, wherein we ask you to lay claim to your loyalties with regards to a pair of typically warring movie characters, naughty and nice or sometimes something a bit grayer -- this week we're wishing a happy 103 years young to the great Olivia de Havilland, turning our eyes to her Oscar-winning role in William Wyler's 1949 film The Heiress. Olivia plays "Catherine," a spinster-type who falls for "Morris"... who is played by Montgomery Clift so it's quite easy to know right off the bat why she falls for him. But is he only in it for the ruby buttons?

online surveys

Previously Pride Month is kaput and with it our fourth and final Lgbt-related poll, which had you choosing between gay Meryls -- Clarissa from The Hours managed to both buy the flowers and storm the poll, taking 71% of your vote.
See full article at FilmExperience »

When Under the Dome Sliced a Cow in Half, It Stirred a 'Bloody' Debate

When Under the Dome Sliced a Cow in Half, It Stirred a 'Bloody' Debate
To quite vividly illustrate an unsuspecting town’s sudden entrapment by an invisible barrier, Under the Dome defied Bart Simpson and halved a cow, man.

It was six years ago (on June 24, 2013) that CBS’ adaptation of the Stephen King novel made its debut. The premise found the fictional town of Chester’s Mill suddenly cut off from the rest of the world by a mysterious and indestructible dome, leading to a clash of would-be heroes, opportunistic residents, local government, military forces and the media.

At the instant that the dome dropped, Iraq War veteran Dale “Barbie” Barbara (played by Mike Vogel
See full article at TVLine.com »

How Hollywood Is (and Isn’t) Getting Better at Lgbtq Inclusion

  • Variety
How Hollywood Is (and Isn’t) Getting Better at Lgbtq Inclusion
Brandon Flynn, one of the breakout actors from Netflix’s “13 Reasons Why,” has spent the last two years fielding questions about his personal life. In 2017, he wrote a passionate post on Instagram, advocating for an Australian vote that allowed for same-sex marriage. Soon enough, news sites such as HuffPost and E! News were reporting that he’d come out of the closet. Flynn, 25, says that wasn’t the case. “I was embraced, so I never want to take that away from people who have been supportive of me, but in no way, shape or form did I say that this is me coming out,” says Flynn, who at around 15 years old had told his friends and family that he was attracted to men. “I had done that years ago. Being in the industry makes you somewhat of a public curiosity. Hence all of a sudden I was a gay actor,
See full article at Variety »

‘The Heiress’ Blu-ray Review (Criterion)

  • Nerdly
Stars: Olivia de Havilland, Montgomery Clift, Ralph Richardson, Miriam Hopkins | Written by Ruth Goetz, Augustus Goetz | Directed by William Wyler

Ruth and Augustus Goetz adapted their own stage play (itself based on a 19thcentury Henry James novel) for this 1949 melodrama. Directed by William Wyler, just before his mega-budget 1950s period, it’s a small-scale play with big ideas. Like many films of the period, the setting is the high society of New York, except this time the period is the mid-19th century.

Catherine Sloper (Olivia de Havilland) is an enigma. She carries herself with a boyish energy and disarming shyness, more interested in her embroidery than socialising. Socialising in this context means trying to bag a husband, of course. Catherine’s reclusiveness is more of an unwillingness to “present” herself in the cattle market of the upper social echelons. Then she meets the lithe, charming and persuasive Morris Townsend
See full article at Nerdly »

Blu-ray Review: The Heiress, An Age-Old Tale of Love and Loss

Directed by William Wyler in 1949, The Heiress is an adaptation of Henry James’ "Washington Square." More accurately, Wyler's feature drama is the film version of a stage adaptation, written by Ruth and Augustus Goetz from the James novel. The film stars living Hollywood legend Olivia de Havilland as Catherine Sloper, an awkward woman who lives in a stately mansion in New York's Washington Square with her father, a rich doctor (played by the excellent Ralph Richardson). In this 1880s tale, Catherine is likely at or past the age when she should be married off, and so suitors come calling. One of them in particular is the outrageously handsome Morris Townsend. Morris has everything going...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

The Heiress

William Wyler and a trio of fantastic actors make indelible movie history from a grim story by Henry James. How much of love is bald opportunism? How many successes married their way into money? And what’s a lovesick woman to do when a beau may not be true? This may be the key Wyler picture, with the strongest ‘staircase’ scene of them all.

The Heiress

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 974

1949 / B&W / 1:37 flat full frame / 116 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date , 2019 / 39.95

Starring: Olivia de Havilland, Montgomery Clift, Ralph Richardson, Miriam Hopkins, Vanessa Brown.

Cinematography: Leo Tover

Film Editor: William Hornbeck

Original Music: Aaron Copland

Written by Ruth and Agustus Goetz from their play, from the book by Henry James

Produced and Directed by William Wyler

One of Hollywood’s finest directors, William Wyler turned out a high percentage of bona fide classics, distinguished adaptations of books and plays.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Lost James Franco Movie Zeroville Is Finally Getting Released

Lost James Franco Movie Zeroville Is Finally Getting Released
Nearly four years after initially securing distribution, James Franco's movie Zeroville is finally going to hit theaters later this year. We initially reported on this one back in 2014, so it's been a long time coming. This movie has a stacked cast and was made long before Franco was subject to quite a few sexual misconduct allegations, when he was unquestionably a top talent in the industry. In any event, the movie has finally found a new home in myCinema and, at long last, it's going to be released.

James Franco both directs and stars in Zeroville, which is an adaptation of Steve Erickson's novel. It was originally supposed to arrive in 2016, after the domestic distribution rights were secured by Alchemy the year prior at the Toronto International Film Festival. Unfortunately, Alchemy went under just a few months later and the movie wound up being caught up as part of the fallout,
See full article at MovieWeb »

Four Years Later, James Franco’s ‘Zeroville’ Is Finally Being Released

Four Years Later, James Franco’s ‘Zeroville’ Is Finally Being Released
You may recall, dear reader, that in the years preceding “The Disaster ArtistJames Franco was writing and directing films at a breakneck pace — “As I Lay Dying,” “Child of God,” “The Sound and the Fury,” and “In Dubious Battle” all premiered within a three-year span. So did “Zeroville,” a comedy based on Steve Erickson’s novel of the same name, but because it was acquired by Alchemy — the ill-fated distributor that went out of business mere months after picking up the film — it has yet to receive a theatrical release.

Until now, that is, as myCinema appears to have saved “Zeroville” from limbo. The company is based online but partners with some 500 theaters that have the option of licensing its films — like “The Chaperone,” written by “Downton Abbey” creator Julian Fellowes — for traditional brick-and-mortar releases.

Here’s the (rather lengthy) synopsis:

Join Vikar (James Franco), a wide-eyed innocent in love with the movies,
See full article at Indiewire »

Wanda

The work of a great, original, natural filmmaker, Wanda continues to confound viewers that don’t recognize honest human reality when they see it. A woman dispossessed, uprooted and adrift no longer has a self-definition, just a basic drive to subsist and find someone who values her. Morals? It’s hard enough just to survive. Director-actress Barbara Loden isn’t Wanda, yet she is — her film erases the distinctions between movies, theater and reality, something John Cassavetes never quite accomplished.

Wanda

Blu-ray

The Criterion Collection 965

1970 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 103 min. / available through The Criterion Collection / Street Date March 19, 2019 / 39.95

Starring: Barbara Loden, Michael Higgins, Jerome Thier, Jack Ford.

Cinematography, Editing: Nicholas T. Proferes

Produced by Harry Shuster

Directed by Barbara Loden

Consciously or unconsciously, most American movies pre: 1970 promote the status quo success story. People living below middle-class status were often patronized; in many socially-conscious movies they were either problem cases or overly sentimentalized,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Jennifer Jones Centennial: "Indiscretions of an American Wife"

We're celebrating Jennifer Jones's centennial. By your request (you voted on which two movies we'd cover), here's Nathaniel R...

Your viewing assignment should you choose to accept it, and you really should, is Vittorio de Sica's Indiscretion of an American Wife (1953), a floridly emotional 65 minute drama (you read that right) in which a very thirsty Jennifer Jones engages in some illicit behavior because what else can you do when confronted with the beauty of Montgomery Clift in the 1950s?

Though 1953 was arguably Monty's peak (he also starred in Hitchcock's I Confess! and the Best Picture winner From Here to Eternity that year), this melodrama from the Italian master Vittorio de Sica is Jennifer Jones's film from fussy indecisive start to farewell heartbreak finish...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Film News Roundup: Environmental Doc ‘The Human Element’ Set for January

  • Variety
Film News Roundup: Environmental Doc ‘The Human Element’ Set for January
In today’s film news roundup, environmental documentary “The Human Element” and romancer “Frank and Ava” get release dates and NBA player Dwight Howard backs Christopher Walken’s “Percy.”

Release Dates

The Orchard has set a Jan. 29 digital release date for James Balog’s environmental documentary “The Human Element,” Variety has learned exclusively.

Balog uses his camera to reveal how environmental change is affecting the lives of everyday Americans. Following the four classical elements — air, earth, fire and water— to frame his journey, Balog explores wildfires, hurricanes, sea level rise, coal mining, and the changes in the air we breathe. “The Human Element” is aimed as providing inspiration for a more balanced relationship between humanity and nature.

Balog’s previous film “Chasing Ice” was awarded an Emmy for outstanding nature programming. “The Human Element” is produced by Earth Vision. Here’s the trailer:

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8th House Entertainment is releasing “Frank and Ava,
See full article at Variety »

Marvin Levy: The Road From Tex and Jinx to ‘Close Encounters’

  • Variety
It’s been more than 40 years since publicist and newly minted Governors Award honoree Marvin Levy began his close association with Steven Spielberg, but their adventures together only constitute one of acts in the Levy saga.

From the time Levy graduated from NYU in 1949, the affable but no-nonsense communications pro has been somewhere near the center of showbiz gravity.

“I was always a fan of the Broadway musicals starting in high school, and by college we were regularly scoring tickets for opening nights and showing up in tuxedos. We’d see epic shows like ‘Finian’s Rainbow’ and ‘Brigadoon,’ and being naughty boys, we’d go to the backstage door dressed in our tuxes and they’d let us in and we’d get word of where to go for the cast parties.”

When asked if a Variety column item from 1954 — “Marvin Levy and Gordon Morris penned the special material
See full article at Variety »

Film Review: A Star is Re-Examined in ‘Making Montgomery Clift’

Chicago – Montgomery “Monty” Clift was an enigma as a “movie star” from the minute his image reflected from the silver screen. Dark and intense, he exhibited a inner ferocity that was unmatched from any other actor of his era, including Marlon Brando. Because of the enigma, his persona has often been mischaracterized, and he died young in his mid-forties. His nephew Robert Anderson Clift seeks to revitalize the authentic Monty in the new documentary “Making Montgomery Clift.”

Rating: 3.5/5.0

Essentially, before this film, Monty Clift’s life was defined by two very popular biographies that came out in the late 1970s… “Monty” by Robert Laguardia and “Montgomery Clift: A Biography” by Patricia Bosworth. The Bosworth bio has been praised as one of the must-read profiles of a major star, but both books advance the notion that Clift had one of the “slowest suicides” in Hollywood history. Robert Anderson Clift wanted to find something else,
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Montgomery Clift: the untold story of Hollywood's misunderstood star

In a new documentary, myths and assumptions about the Oscar-nominated heartthrob who struggled with his sexuality are replaced with the little-known truth

For over 30 years, scripts have floated around Hollywood promising to tell the story of Montgomery Clift, one of the most innovative and handsome actors in history. Tellingly, they’re always pitched under working titles like ‘Beautiful Loser’ and' ‘Tragic Beauty’. Guided by the key biographies of Clift, they reliably parrot a narrative which paints the actor as a startlingly attractive and prodigiously gifted man who, according to one notably overheated tabloid TV show “became a drug-addicted alcoholic living in a self-imposed hell because he had a secret he couldn’t live with”.

Related: Tab Hunter: how Hollywood's boy next door became a gay icon
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina: Archie-verse Easter Eggs and Reference Guide

Chris Cummins Nov 2, 2018

We're hunting down all the Archie and pop culture Easter Eggs we can find in Chilling Adventures of Sabrina!

This Chilling Adventures of Sabrina articles contains nothing but spoilers. We have a spoiler-free review right here if you prefer.

Like Riverdale before it, Chilling Adventures of Sabrina is a series steeped in popular culture. Creator/show-runner Roberto Aquirre-Sacasa has gone on record with his love of the horror genre several times, and a series like this one is a supernatural playground of allusions and references. More than just tipping its hat to fright flicks however, the series also has some surprising connections to the Archieverse at large...both on TV and in the printed page.

This guide is a monster, but it is not yet definitive. So if you catch a reference that I didn't, give me a holler on Twitter and I will update this article accordingly.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Place in the Sun,’ ‘From Here to Eternity’

  • Gold Derby
Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films, ranked worst to best, include ‘A Place in the Sun,’ ‘From Here to Eternity’
Montgomery Clift would’ve celebrated his 98th birthday on October 17, 2018. The iconic actor gave only a small number of onscreen performances before his untimely death in 1966 at the age of 45. Yet several of those titles remain classics. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

A product of the Actor’s Studio, where he studied under Lee Strasberg and Elia Kazan, Clift had a successful Broadway career before moving to Hollywood. Among his notable stage credits was the role of Henry in Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “The Skin of Our Teeth.” Like James Dean and Marlon Brando, he was one of the original method actors, calling upon past memories and experiences to inform his performances.

He came to the attention of movie audiences in 1948 with a pair of releases: Howard Hawks‘ western “Red River” and Fred Zinnemann‘s WWII drama “The Search.
See full article at Gold Derby »

Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best

  • Gold Derby
Montgomery Clift movies: 12 greatest films ranked worst to best
Montgomery Clift would’ve celebrated his 98th birthday on October 17, 2018. The iconic actor gave only a small number of onscreen performances before his untimely death in 1966 at the age of 45. Yet several of those titles remain classics. In honor of his birthday, let’s take a look back at 12 of his greatest films, ranked worst to best.

A product of the Actor’s Studio, where he studied under Lee Strasberg and Elia Kazan, Clift had a successful Broadway career before moving to Hollywood. Among his notable stage credits was the role of Henry in Thornton Wilder’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “The Skin of Our Teeth.” Like James Dean and Marlon Brando, he was one of the original method actors, calling upon past memories and experiences to inform his performances.

He came to the attention of movie audiences in 1948 with a pair of releases: Howard Hawks‘ western “Red River” and Fred Zinnemann‘s WWII drama “The Search.
See full article at Gold Derby »

99¢ rentals to fill in the Oscar gaps

While we wait (impatiently) for the major Oscar contenders to show themselves to general audiences, why not check out an older Oscar nominees for kicks and to fill any gaps in your Oscar knowledge. Here are a few that iTunes is offering to rent for just 99¢... naturally I have to share the posters for the ones with exclamatory taglines.

Sunrise (1927)/ Street Angel (1928) for Janet Gaynor, the very first Best Actress winner and the only Best Actress winner to win for multiple roles simultaneously (they changed the rule thereafter)

In Old Chicago (1938) Tyrone Powers in a six-time nominated film which won Alice Brady supporting actress

The Rains Came (1939) starring Myrna Loy and up for six Oscars

Blood and Sand (1941) this torreador drama starring Tyrone Power won Best Cinematography

This Above All (1942) a romantic drama starring Joan Fontaine and Tyrone Power received 4 nominations and a win for Art Direction

The Snake Pit
See full article at FilmExperience »

Oscar Flashback: The six films that earned three of the Big Five, including ‘Network,’ ‘Million Dollar Baby’

Oscar Flashback: The six films that earned three of the Big Five, including ‘Network,’ ‘Million Dollar Baby’
This article marks Part 4 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following six films that took home a trio of prizes among the top races.

With a total of 13 nominations, the most of any Oscar contender that year, “From Here to Eternity” (1953) towered over the 26th Academy Awards. At the ceremony, the Fred Zinnemann film dominated, earning eight prizes, including three in the Big Five categories. It earned Best Picture, plus Best Director honors for Zinnemann and Best Adapted Screenplay (Daniel Taradash). While Frank Sinatra and
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that scored two of the Big Five, including ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ ‘La La Land’

Oscar Flashback: The 11 films that scored two of the Big Five, including ‘The Philadelphia Story,’ ‘La La Land’
This article marks Part 3 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on films that contended for the Big Five Oscars – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted). With “A Star Is Born” this year on the cusp of joining this exclusive group of Oscar favorites, join us as we look back at the 43 extraordinary pictures that earned Academy Awards nominations in each of the Big Five categories, including the following 11 films that scored a pair of prizes among the top races.

At the 4th Academy Awards ceremony, “Cimarron” (1931) made Oscar history as the first motion picture to ever score nominations in the Big Five categories. On the big night, the western took home the top prize in Best Picture, as well as the Oscar in Best Adapted Screenplay (Howard Estabrook). Not as successful were the picture’s director, Wesley Ruggles, topped by Norman Taurog (“Skippy”), and the leads,
See full article at Gold Derby »
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