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‘Parasite’ Film Review: Bong Joon-ho Tackles Disparity With Delicious Dark Comedy

‘Parasite’ Film Review: Bong Joon-ho Tackles Disparity With Delicious Dark Comedy
Cannes has always offered a home to both audacious genre filmmaking and politically engaged, social issue cinema but it’s usually been an either/or proposition.

Festival juries, meanwhile, have tended to celebrate one at the expense of the other. While Quentin Tarantino’s 2004 jury paid honor to both offerings — awarding Park Chan-wook’s “Oldboy” the Grand Prize and Michael Moore’s “Fahrenheit 9/11” the Palme d’Or – most have signaled a marked preference for politically liberal, if formally conservative works like Ken Loach’s “I, Daniel Blake” in lieu of more outré offerings.

So it will be particularly interesting to see what this year’s Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu-led bunch makes of Bong Joon-ho’s “Parasite,” a genre-bending dark comedy with searing class consciousness that premiered in Cannes on Tuesday.

Also Read: 'Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood' Film Review: A Contemplative Quentin Tarantino Still Blows the Roof Off
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Frankie’ Review: Isabelle Huppert and Marisa Tomei Impress in Small Family Drama | Cannes 2019

In truth, the stakes are not that high in Ira Sachs’ Frankie. That may seem curt once you learn that the title character, played by Isabelle Huppert, is about to lose a long battle with cancer, but her fate is already sealed and she’s well aware of it. As she gathers her family for a holiday in picturesque Sintra, Portugal, the petty drama in their own lives surpasses her own and over the course of a few hours you wonder if they’ll all become a little more appreciative of it all. The Frankie in question is pretty much …
See full article at Collider.com »

Cannes Report, Day 7: Big Deal for Terrence Malick, Isabelle Huppert Dazzles in ‘Frankie’

Film sales heated up on the Croisette as the Cannes Film Festival entered its second week.

On Monday, Fox Searchlight snapped up the U.S. rights, along with some international rights, to Terrence Malick’s “A Hidden Life,” selling for $14 million, according to THR.

The deal is one of the largest of the festival so far, and it was a result of a heated bidding war that also included Netflix and Paramount, according to an individual with knowledge.

In Monday’s report, we mentioned that the film was heralded as a beautiful, poetic return to form for Malick, who is back at Cannes after winning the Palme d’Or for “The Tree of Life” back in 2011. August Diehl stars in the film about a World War II conscientious objector in Austria who refused to fight for the Nazis. The film is told in English and German, and Matthias Schoenaerts, Valerie Pachner,
See full article at The Wrap »

Cannes Review: Isabelle Huppert Shines in Ira Sachs’ Stilted ‘Frankie’

In Frankie, the scattered personae of an unconventional family gather in the seaside Portuguese town of Sintra for what might be the last time. The matriarch, as it turns out, is dying and so wishes to pass on some wisdom and maybe do a little match-making while she feels she still can. It is a heartfelt and modest work but an oddly languid one, a movie that asks the viewer to dig beneath the awkward, stilted topsoil of uneasy family reunion and find the tangled roots beneath. Question is, will you be bothered?

Isabelle Huppert plays that very matriarch, a famous actress named Francesca who’s recently had a cancer recurrence and now fears the worst, although you wouldn’t notice. Frankie begins her day with a topless dip in the hotel pool and later we’ll see her play piano, crack jokes, and possibly even get some. “Why are you dressed for a funeral?
See full article at The Film Stage »

2019 Cannes Critics’ Panel: Day 8 – Ira Sachs’ Frankie

The French have a fondness for Americana from the likes of Clint Eastwood, James Gray, Sean Baker and Ira Sachs who for this seventh feature film and first trip to Cannes comfortably moved to his first international shoot (we exclude 2007’s Married Life which was shot in Vancouver). A mainstay at Sundance and Berlin, his films have always been supported by major international film festivals so it’s no wonder that producers Saïd Ben Saïd and Michel Merkt joined the formerly titled A Family Vacation, Frankie for a France/Portugal/Belgium/Us co-production and nice brochette of international stars with Isabelle Huppert as Frankie, Greg Kinnear, Marisa Tomei, Jérémie Renier, Brendan Gleeson and Pascal Greggory.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Frankie | 2019 Cannes Film Festival Review

A Death in the Family: Sachs Sacks Huppert in Sun Dappled Soap Opera

The latest film from American director Ira Sachs is set in the lush, sun-dappled climes of Sintra, Portugal, wherein inimitable Isabelle Huppert stars as the eponymous Frankie, a popular film and television star dying of cancer. The various members of her bric-a-brac extended family have been summoned to join her, not so much as to say goodbye, but as an opportunity to spend some precious memorable moments together as she succumbs to her terminal illness.

Scripted by Sachs’ partner and usual scribe Mauricio Zacharias, their latest endeavor is a multicultural hodgepodge of noted cast members assembling for what’s meant to be a subtle, slightly nostalgic homage to a dying matriarch who wields significant power and presence over her intimates.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

‘Frankie’ Review: Isabelle Huppert Delivers Her Most Vulnerable Performance Ever

‘Frankie’ Review: Isabelle Huppert Delivers Her Most Vulnerable Performance Ever
Frankie,” by the American writer-director Ira Sachs, is a tiny little trinket of a film. It’s like an elegant bracelet that’s modest enough to go unnoticed, but nevertheless reveals a quietly exquisite beauty to those who are willing to lean in and look closer (even if they have to squint). In other words, it’s an Ira Sachs movie, only more so. But in this one, that bracelet is being worn by Isabelle Huppert, and it fits on her wrist like a second skin.

Sachs has always been a storyteller who doesn’t create his characters so much as he observes them from a safe but intimate distance — watching them the way you might catch yourself staring at a stranger on a crowded subway train — and his recent movies have earned him a reputation for making gentle human dramas that seem more like snapshots than full-sized portraits; even
See full article at Indiewire »

Frankie review – Ira Sachs' bickering poshos bore us to tears

Isabelle Huppert sleepwalks through a film that proves even great directors are capable of crimes against cinema

Even the very best film-makers can lay an egg sometimes. And Ira Sachs has laid one so big that the walls of the Palais des Festivals may have be knocked down so it can be safely removed. This really is baffling, considering how superb his other movies have been, such as his complex drama Little Men (2016) and the wonderful lifelong-romance story Love Is Strange (2014).

Related: Young Ahmed review – subtle and timely tale of radicalisation
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Frankie’ Film Review: Isabelle Huppert and Marisa Tomei Shine in Quiet Family Drama

‘Frankie’ Film Review: Isabelle Huppert and Marisa Tomei Shine in Quiet Family Drama
In a competition marked by so many stylish exercises and genre hybrids, sometimes a little simplicity can provide a welcome respite. And that’s exactly what director Ira Sachs puts on offer with “Frankie,” an inter-generational family drama that premiered in Cannes on Monday.

Telling the story of a dying matriarch who assembles the extended clan for one last family trip, the film studiously avoids melodrama or theatrics of any sort, enfolding instead as a kind of melancholic tone poem about a family dealing with impending change, as they take a series of unhurried strolls through the Portuguese town of Sintra.

Because it follows French and American actors as they chattily wind through a picturesque European setting over the course of an uneventful day, “Frankie” could easily be retitled “Before Sunset: At Death’s Door,” but the project’s original title, “A Family Vacation,” would be equally valid.

Also Read:
See full article at The Wrap »

Cannes Film Review: ‘Frankie’

  • Variety
Cannes Film Review: ‘Frankie’
As a filmmaker, Ira Sachs, the director of “Love Is Strange,” “Little Men,” and (his masterpiece) “Keep the Lights On,” is like a flower that keeps sprouting new tendrils, growing ever more beautiful and complicated and delicate. His new movie, “Frankie,” may the closest that anyone has come to making an American version of an Eric Rohmer film. I say that having long compared Richard Linklater’s “Before Sunrise” and its sequels to Rohmer (and make no mistake: all three of the “Before” films are marvelous). But “Frankie,” even more exactingly, re-creates the deceptively casual and meandering but pinpoint Rohmeresque sensation of a small handful of characters wandering around, not doing much of anything but revealing, through conversation and (occasionally) through action, who they are and how, almost imperceptibly, over the course of one movie, they might change.

Frankie” is a film made with immaculate craftsmanship (and one non-Rohmer element:
See full article at Variety »

'Frankie': Film Review | Cannes 2019

'Frankie': Film Review | Cannes 2019
Shifting from the New York settings of Keep the Lights On, Love Is Strange and Little Men to one of the most beautiful corners of Europe, director Ira Sachs offers many gentle pleasures in his latest film, Frankie, not least of them the gorgeous locations in the verdant Portuguese mountain landscape of Sintra. Alongside the magnetic Isabelle Huppert in a role that draws with equal grace from her well of dry humor, flinty intelligence, diva hauteur and internalized sorrow, there are affecting moments to savor also from Brendan Gleeson and Marisa Tomei in a solid ensemble cast.

If the sedate, gossamer-thin drama about family ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

With Fox Searchlight Behind It, Terrence Malick’s ‘A Hidden Life’ Could Go Far

With Fox Searchlight Behind It, Terrence Malick’s ‘A Hidden Life’ Could Go Far
Terrence Malick is back. The reclusive Texas filmmaker went to Cannes to support his ninth feature film, “A Hidden Life,” but he did not pose for photographers. He did soak up his auteur’s ovation for the three-hour world premiere of the World War II drama Sunday at the Grand Theatre Lumiere. Did he show up at the Monday press conference? Mais non! His stars August Diehl (“Inglourious Basterds”) and Valerie Pachner did the honors.

Énorme ovation pour #AHiddenLife de #TerrenceMalick un grand film à la réalisation et aux images extraordinaires. Le réalisateur américain a frappé un grand coup 8 ans après sa palme d’or pour #TheTreeOfLife.#Cannes2019 pic.twitter.com/DryquKPKde

— Alex Pastorello (@PastorelloAlex1) May 19, 2019

Fox Searchlight, which took Cannes 2011 Palme d’Or-winner “The Tree of Life” to a Best Director Oscar nomination and $61 million worldwide, has scooped up his new film, which has been for sale for some time,
See full article at Indiewire »

Xavier Dolan Hails ‘Magnificent’ Cannes Competitor ‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’: A ‘Powerful Piece of Cinema’

Xavier Dolan Hails ‘Magnificent’ Cannes Competitor ‘Portrait of a Lady on Fire’: A ‘Powerful Piece of Cinema’
Cannes whiz kid Xavier Dolan may be readying to premiere his latest film, “Matthias & Maxime,” at the French festival that helped put him on the map, but the Québécois creator appears to have already picked a winner for this year’s Palme d’Or. In a moving and effusive Instagram post, the “Laurence Anyways” and “Mommy” filmmaker hailed Céline Sciamma’s “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” as “magnificent” and a “powerful piece of cinema.” The film debuted to rave reviews this weekend, with IndieWire’s own David Ehrlich hailing it as “a painterly masterpiece.”

After completing a self-described trilogy of coming-of-age films — “Water Lilies,” “Tomboy,” and “Girlhood” — Cannes regular Sciamma has shifted her interests in the female experience to her first-ever period piece. Set on an isolated island during the latter half of the eighteenth century, “Portrait of a Lady on Fire” features “Heaven Will Wait” star Noémie Merlant
See full article at Indiewire »

Korean Actor Song Kang-ho is First Asian Honored With Locarno Excellence Award

  • Variety
Korean Actor Song Kang-ho is First Asian Honored With Locarno Excellence Award
The Locarno Film Festival will pay tribute to leading South Korean actor Song Kang-ho, marking the first time this prestigious prize has gone to an Asian film personality.

Song, 52, who made his big screen debut at 29 in Hong Sang-soo’s edgy “The Day a Pig Fell into the Well” (1996), has since “never stopped experimenting,” said the Swiss fest dedicated to indie cinema in a statement.

The fest also underlined the versatile talent’s masterful turns in works by South Korean filmmakers such as Bong Joon-ho, Hong Sang-soo, Jee- woon Kim and Park Chan-wook that have propelled him to top star status at home and made him an international name.

His standout roles include turns in big-budget blockbuster “Shiri” (1999) directed by Kang Je-gyu; Kim Jee-woon’s wrestling comedy “The Foul King” (2000); Park Chan-wook’s “Joint Security Area” (2000); “Sympathy for Mr Vengeance” (2002) and “Thirst” (2009), Bong Joon-ho’s “Memories of Murder” (2003) and “Snowpiercer
See full article at Variety »

Amazon Studios Acquires Ladj Ly’s ‘Les Misérables’ — Cannes

Amazon Studios Acquires Ladj Ly’s ‘Les Misérables’ — Cannes
There’s a new “Les Misérables” at Cannes, but worry not: Russell Crowe doesn’t sing in this one. Amazon Studios has acquired writer-director Ladj Ly’s debut feature film following its world premiere at Cannes. Variety first reported the news, including the detail that “Netflix was also believed to be pursuing the film, with insiders pegging the final price for the film at $1.5 million.”

Based not on Victor Hugo’s timeless novel but rather the riots that erupted in Ly’s neighborhood in Paris in 2005 — the same neighborhood, in fact, where part of said novel takes place — “Les Misérables” was co-written by Giordano Gederlini and Alexis Manenti; Toufik Ayadi and Christophe Barral of Srab Films produced it.

In his review of the film, IndieWire’s David Ehrlich wrote that it “bears little outward resemblance to the epic story of Jean Valjean and his stolen loaf of bread. But Ly
See full article at Indiewire »

New to Streaming: ‘Apollo 11,’ ‘Greta,’ ‘Charlie Says,’ and More

With a seemingly endless amount of streaming options — not only the titles at our disposal, but services themselves — we’re highlighting the noteworthy titles that have recently hit platforms. Check out this week’s selections below and an archive of past round-ups here.

Antichrist (Lars von Trier)

Like the majority of Lars von Trier films, from the first moments of Antichrist, one will be able to discern if it’s an experience they want to proceed with. For those will to endure its specific unpleasantness, there’s a poetic, affecting exploration of despair at its center. Chaos reigns, indeed. – Jordan R.

Where to Stream: Mubi (free for 30 days)

Apollo 11 (Todd Douglas Miller)

On July 16, 1969, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Buzz Aldrin embarked on a historic lunar odyssey, successfully landing on the moon and then returning to Earth. Free of talking heads, reenactments, and newly-recorded narration, the new documentary Apollo 11
See full article at The Film Stage »

Curated Streaming Site Le Cinéma Club Announces Robust Relaunch, Anchored by Rare Claire Denis Film

Highly curated, relentlessly knowledgeable, and totally free streaming site Le Cinéma Club is preparing for a robust new relaunch next month, bolstered by its release of Claire Denis’ ultra-rare “Keep It for Yourself.” The platform will relaunch on June 14, with a redesigned site and expanded editorial content, thanks to support from Chanel.

“It has been exciting and immensely gratifying to see Le Cinéma Club grow, and to work with so many talented filmmakers,” said founder Marie-Louise Khondji in an official statement. “With Le Cinéma Club my wish has always been to create a distinctive, dynamic and contemporary space for cinema online, and to address the need for new avenues of film distribution and promotion in a rapidly shifting media landscape. We’re delighted to bring Le Cinéma Club 2.0 to our global audience, and we couldn’t be more honored or grateful for Chanel’s support.”

Founded in 2015, Le Cinéma Club aims to “celebrate new talent,
See full article at Indiewire »

Rushes: Doris Day, Cannes Trailers, Portrait of Joanna Hogg

NEWSDoris Day. The American actress, singer, and Animal rights activist, Doris Day has died. Anthony Lane provides a tender remembrance at The New Yorker: "There was a depth, despite everything, to her fabled simplicity, and a courage to her lack of complications; even as the world was curdling around her, she insisted on the milk of human kindness." Recommended VIEWINGWith the 2019 Cannes Film Festival having now begun, a slew of trailers has arrived ranging from Ira Sachs collaboration with Isabelle Huppert, Werner Herzog's mysterious Japan set film, to French comedy auteur (and DJ!) Quentin Dupieux's new... horror film?!Rick Alverson's menacing, Jeff Goldblum led pic about a lobotomizing doctor gets its first stirring trailer ahead of a Us release.Recommended READINGJoanna Hogg by Eleanor Taylor for The New York Times.In the event of her new, majestic film opening in Us cinema's, Brit auteur Joanna Hogg
See full article at MUBI »

Cannes: ‘Frankie’ Filmmaker Ira Sachs Introduces His Sprawling Family Dramedy Cast

Cannes: ‘Frankie’ Filmmaker Ira Sachs Introduces His Sprawling Family Dramedy Cast
For his first Cannes entry, beloved auteur Ira Sachs is bringing the heat, care of a star-studded cast of both regulars and newbies, all centered around the eponymous Frankie, a formidable matriarch who has brought together her family in the sunny climes of Sintra, Portugal.

The film stars Isabelle Huppert in a role already earning awards buzz, along with Brendan Gleeson, Marisa Tomei, Jérémie Renier, Greg Kinnear, and many more, all of whom are introduced in the following gallery, exclusive to IndieWire.

Per the film’s official synopsis: “Unfolding over the course of a late summer’s day in the fabled resort town of Sintra, Portugal, ‘Frankie’ follows three generations who have gathered for a vacation organized by the family matriarch (Isabelle Huppert). In this fairy tale setting, husbands and wives, parents and children, friends and lovers — stirred by their romantic impulses — discover the cracks between them, as well as unexpected depth of feeling.
See full article at Indiewire »

Le Pacte Boards ‘La Daronne’ With Isabelle Huppert (Exclusive)

  • Variety
Le Pacte, the Paris-based company that has French rights to five movies competing at Cannes, has boarded Jean-Paul Salomé’s “La Daronne,” a crime comedy starring Isabelle Huppert as a French-Arabic translator working for the anti-drug squad in Paris.

Based on Hannelore Cayre’s popular novel, “La Daronne” follows the story of Patience Portefeux (Huppert), who gets embroiled in a failed drug deal, inheriting a pile of marijuana. While keeping her job with the anti-drug squad, Portefeux crosses to the other side and becomes a well-known drug dealer.

Kristina Larsen at Les Films du Lendemain and Jean-Baptiste Dupont at La Boetie Films produced the film. Jean Labadie’s Le Pacte will distribute in France and is handling international sales on the movie. Camille Neel’s sales team at Le Pacte is unveiling a promo of “La Daronne” at Cannes.

At the Marché, Le Pacte is also selling Benoît Forgeard’s offbeat comedy “Yves,
See full article at Variety »
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