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Rushes: Rip Torn, "Apocalypse Now" Reconsidered, Saul Bass' Film Posters

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveries. For daily updates follow us @NotebookMUBI.NEWSRip TornThe great American actor and comedian Rip Torn has died. The New York Times gathers his eclectic accomplishments as a performer with his many personal and artistic eccentricities in their obit. The first poster for Hirokazu Kore-eda's The Truth, starring Catherine Deneuve as a pioneering French actress, set to publish her confessional memoir, and Juliette Binoche as her screenwriter daughter. Recommended VIEWINGAn ominous teaser for Akira director Katsuhiro Otomo's forthcoming third feature, Orbital Era. The film follows a group of young boys surviving in a space colony as it undergoes construction. The Royal Ocean Film Society analyzes the design philosophy of filmmaker and graphic designer Saul Bass in this guided visual tour of his landmark film posters.The divisive, baroque Italian auteur Paolo Sorrentino is back with a crime epic concerning the inner
See full article at MUBI »

Universal Music Group Sued By Estates Of Tom Petty, Tupac And Others Over Fire Losses

A lawsuit by prominent musicians against Universal Music Group stemming from a fire that destroyed their master recordings is seeking class action status and in excess of $100 million in damages.

The suit was filed in Us Central District Court in Los Angeles by the law firms King, Holmes, Paterno & Soriano; McPherson Llp; and Susman Godfrey Llp. Plaintiffs include the estates of Tom Petty and Tupac Shakur, the bands Hole and Soundgarden, and singer-songwriter Steve Earle.

The 2008 fire affected hundreds of thousands of master recordings and unreleased music and other materials. Umg downplayed the effects, but an investigation by the New York Times discovered the actual damages. Umg is the world’s largest recording company and had works ranging back to Louis Armstrong as well as more modern materials.

The lawsuit declared that Umg breached its contract with the affected musicians by failing to archive materials properly. Instead, the works were kept “in an inadequate,
See full article at Deadline »

Soundgarden, Tupac Estate, Tom Petty’s Ex-Wife Lead Lawsuit Over Universal Music Fire

Soundgarden, Tom Petty’s ex-wife Jane, Hole, Steve Earle and the estate of Tupac Shakur have filed a lawsuit on behalf of a class against Universal Music Group, seeking damages related to a 2008 fire that allegedly destroyed over 500,000 recordings.

The suit accuses Universal Music of negligence in not doing enough to prevent the fire, as well as concealing the extent of the destruction from artists while simultaneously pursuing litigation and insurance claims to recoup losses. The suit claims that Universal took in settlement proceeds and insurance claims valued at $150 million,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Universal Music Chief Says Label Owes Artists ‘Transparency’ Over Vault Fire Losses

Universal Music Group CEO Lucian Grainge told employees to be transparent with any artist asking about whether their recordings were destroyed in a 2008 fire at Universal Studios, the Los Angeles Times reports.

In an internal memo circulated to employees (and obtained by the La Times), Grainge said, “Let me be clear: we owe our artists transparency. We owe them answers. I will ensure that the senior management of this company, starting with me, owns this.”

Grainge also outlined proper protocol should an artist get in touch about the status of their recordings.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes’ Film Review: Documentary Crams Ten Pounds of Jazz History Into a Five-Pound Sack

  • The Wrap
‘Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes’ Film Review: Documentary Crams Ten Pounds of Jazz History Into a Five-Pound Sack
Jazz is an art form that can be examined any number of ways — historically, racially, structurally, even philosophically — but choosing one of those runs the risk of ignoring the equally-important rest. Sophie Huber’s thoughtful but unfocused documentary “Blue Note Records: Beyond the Notes” falls short primarily because it tries too much, examining history, modern-day impact and legacy all in one.

Nevertheless an engaging thumbnail overview of the record label’s heyday, its key players, and the descendants and disciples committed to carrying on its name and vision, “Beyond the Notes” succeeds better as an introduction to Blue Note and jazz in general than as an expert or in-depth examination of the musical genre or one of its most iconic distributors.

Part of the challenge is deciding where to start: With the musicians who pioneered the genre, or the earliest fans-turned visionaries who helped get them heard? Huber begins with Alfred Lion and Francis Wolff,
See full article at The Wrap »

Nirvana, Tom Petty, Aretha Franklin Recordings Among Estimated Half Million Songs Lost in 2008 Umg Fire

Nirvana, Tom Petty, Aretha Franklin Recordings Among Estimated Half Million Songs Lost in 2008 Umg Fire
Nirvana, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Aretha Franklin and scores of other music luminaries’ master tapes were destroyed during a fire at Universal Studios in 2008, New York Times Magazine reports. The apparent loss spans the scope of decades of recordings, which may include material from Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Etta James, Buddy Holly, Chuck Berry, Elton John, Nirvana, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, R.E.M., Eminem, Nine Inch Nails, Janet Jackson, the Roots, Hole and many other artists’ work.

The fire was widely reported in 2008, but according to the Times,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Iconic New Orleans Musician Dr. John Dies

Tony Sokol Jun 6, 2019

New Orleans musician Mac Rebennack conjured the best mojo in Dr. John the Night Tripper.

"They call me Dr. John, The Night Tripper," New Orleans voodoo pianist Mac Rebennack sang on the 1969 song "Gris-Gris Gumbo Ya Ya." With his sizzling Gris-Gris his hand, he lived and breathed New Orleans. The last of the best, Dr. John the Night Tripper, died of a heart attack "toward the break of day" on Thursday, June 6, according to the New York Times. Like Leon Redbone, who died last week, there is some dispute over Dr. John's age, various reports have him listed as 77 or 78.

"The family thanks all whom have shared his unique musical journey, and requests privacy at this time," a statement from the musician's family said. They did not say where he died, though he reportedly was resting at his Lake Pontchartrain area home, not too far from New Orleans.
See full article at Den of Geek »

‘Peaky Blinders’ Composer Antony Genn Talks About the Show’s Innovative Music in Hilarious Midem Chat

  • Variety
‘Peaky Blinders’ Composer Antony Genn Talks About the Show’s Innovative Music in Hilarious Midem Chat
Even in the current golden age of innovative television, the popular British crime drama “Peaky Blinders” has set a daring standard for its use of music, with original songs by Nick Cave, Laura Marling, Johnny Cash, the White Stripes and many more. Composer, music director, producer and artist Antony Genn, whose sprawling career has included stints with Pulp, Joe Strummer, Elastica and his own group The Hours, is responsible for the show’s music since season four, and brings a refreshingly punk attitude to an often sedate musical form that adds even more grit to the already gritty Cillian Murphy-starring show.

Genn’s musical career began in his teens when schoolfriend Jarvis Cocker asked him, “Do you fancy playing bass in our band?” “I don’t know how to play bass,” Genn replied. “Don’t worry about that, none of us can really play.” As is shown by this
See full article at Variety »

He Shot The Famous And The Ordinary: Emmy-Contending Doc Puts Focus On Brilliant Photographer Garry Winogrand

The great photographer Garry Winogrand took more than a million pictures during his career. Among his preferred subjects was people at airports, especially those saddled with luggage.

“When we talk about people psychologically and having issues we say, ‘Oh, they’ve got baggage,’” notes Geoff Dyer, author of a book on Winogrand. “That’s one of the things that’s so manifested in Winogrand. Yeah, we see the baggage these people are carrying.”

Dyer makes that observation in the documentary Garry Winogrand: All Things Are Photographable, a film in which director Sasha Waters Freyer unpacks the complicated life and remarkable work of a man some consider the greatest American street photographer.

“He was really interested in these public spaces where a certain kind of theater of the street might unfold,” Waters Freyer tells Deadline. “He took this style associated with photojournalism and brought it into the world of the fine arts.
See full article at Deadline »

Historic Preservation Group: Nashville’s Music Row Is Endangered

Nashville’s Music Row, which has for decades served as the center of the city’s music industry as well as a key tourist destination, has been named to the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s 2019 list of America’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places. The list, compiled by the privately funded nonprofit organization each year since 1988, highlights examples of architectural integrity and cultural significance that are at risk of destruction or irreparable damage.

For more than 60 years, Nashville’s Music Row has been the bustling center of the city’s recording and music-publishing industries,
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Netflix Reveals Trailer for ‘The Black Godfather: The Clarence Avant Story’

Netflix Reveals Trailer for ‘The Black Godfather: The Clarence Avant Story’
Clarence Avant is one of the music business’s most legendary executives. Mentored by Joe Glaser, the longtime manager of Louis Armstrong, Avant has been in the business since the 1950s, managing Sarah Vaughan, R&B singer Little Willie John and others, before he became a powerhouse at Venture and Sussex Records, signing Bill Withers and more while his own a broadcasting company and producing films like Paramount’s Save the Children.

Avant is the subject of a new Netflix documentary The Black Godfather, which is going to be released on
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Film Review: ‘Bolden’

  • Variety
The conundrum that haunts “Bolden,” a murky drama inspired turn-of-the-century New Orleans musician Charles “Buddy” Bolden, is right up front in the opening titles, which inform the audience that little is known about the man’s life story, but he happens to be responsible for inventing jazz. The gulf between Bolden’s importance in pioneering a great American art form and his anonymity in the historical record is the one director Dan Pritzker and his co-writer, David N. Rothschild, must bridge. But what sounds like a great creative opportunity proves here to be more like a trap: In trying to turn Bolden’s biography into the paradigmatic tale of early jazz musicians — and more generally of African Americans in the Deep South — they lean on stereotypes and clichés and never quite define their elusive central figure. Jazz aficionados may appreciate the ambience, including original contributions by trumpet virtuoso Wynton Marsalis,
See full article at Variety »

Wynton Marsalis on 12 Essential Jazz Recordings

Wynton Marsalis on 12 Essential Jazz Recordings
“It’s self-explanatory,” Wynton Marsalis says, pointing toward the papers in front of him. “Basically, if you look at what I wrote, that says everything you need to know.”

The trumpeter had entered only about 30 seconds before, walking into a small conference room at the New York offices of Jazz at Lincoln Center. Impeccably dressed in a gray suit, he leaned in for a quick hug by way of a greeting. If Marsalis seemed a tad impatient, he had a point: The document he’d prepped did in fact speak for itself.
See full article at Rolling Stone »

‘The Apollo’ Review: A Sincere Ode to a Beacon for Black Culture — Tribeca

‘The Apollo’ Review: A Sincere Ode to a Beacon for Black Culture — Tribeca
Some landmarks symbolize the culture behind their existence; others have a hand in creating the culture itself. In Roger Ross Williams’ sincere documentary tribute “The Apollo,” Harlem’s iconic theater receives a generous overview of its role as a cultural hub for black entertainment and culture for close to 90 years. It’s a worthy salute to the theater’s role in sustaining African American performance art through periods of great turmoil, and provides a conduit for exploring how a beacon for black achievement functions from the inside out.

Having said that, “The Apollo” doesn’t work overtime to ask the most probing questions. It’s hard not to watch the movie without considering the issues it glosses over that might have given this absorbing chronicle more of an investigative flair. The non-fiction medium has a reigning king in this department: Documentary maestro Frederick Wiseman, whose cinematic deep-dives include the New York Library portrait “Ex Libris,
See full article at Indiewire »

New ‘Detective Pikachu’ Footage in Earth Day Trailer and Bts Video

Ryan Reynolds helped turn up the Detective Pikachu movie cuteness to overload when he shared a new trailer on Earth Day that was chock full of adorable Pokemon.

Set to Louis Armstrong's It's a Wonderful World, the minute-plus trailer shows a variety of Pokemon interacting with our planet. Squirtle pops out of some water. Pancham plays in bamboo. Psyduck talks and does something else. And so on.

The trailer ends with a real tear-jerker moment where Pikachu (Reynolds) tells Justice Smith's character what his missing dad would do if he were there. It most definitely is a Pikachu World.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmnkAOO6Qo4

The second video is of the behind-the-scenes variety and shows some first glimpses of Reynolds working on the set of Detective Pikachu as well as interview bits with the core cast. It doesn't have nearly as much new footage as the
See full article at TheHDRoom »

Detective Pikachu Earth Day Trailer Celebrates the Wonderful World of Pokemon

Detective Pikachu Earth Day Trailer Celebrates the Wonderful World of Pokemon
A brand new, surprisingly emotional trailer for Detective Pikachu has been released. So far, the marketing campaign for the first ever live-action Pokemon movie can be called a great many things, but heartwarming and tear-jerking probably wasn't at the top of that list. Until now. This latest trailer was released on Earth Day and is set to the tune of Louis Armstrong's classic What a Wonderful World. Perhaps Pokemon and tissues don't normally go together. They certainly will for many fans in this case.

The trailer, appropriately titled "What a Pikachu World," is in stark contrast to what has come before. Where the others have focused on the comedy, fun and action, this one is all heart and Pokemon. We see Justice Smith's character making his way through a world absolutely jam-packed with these creatures. Given the tune that it's set to, it's already likely going to make some people a little weepy.
See full article at MovieWeb »

New ‘Detective Pikachu’ Trailer Reveals a Wonderful World of Pokémon

While previous trailers for Detective Pikachu have worked to explain the story/why exactly the title electro-critter is being voiced by Ryan Reynolds. But some new footage arrived today simply to remind you that this Pokemon movie is also most likely going to make you* bawl like a child. Set to Louis Armstrong's "What a Wonderful World", the new teaser mostly acts as a mood-setter for a world completely populated with familiar Pokemon faces. There's also some brief dialogue with Justice Smith's Tim Goodman having a particularly saccharine heart-to-heart with his new Reynolds-…
See full article at Collider.com »

Ryan Reynolds Reveals an Adorable 'Pokémon Detective Pikachu' Trailer

"What a Wonderful Pikachu..." Oh my goodness, is a Pokemon movie making us all cry? Yes, yes it is. Ryan Reynolds debuted this adorable new trailer for live-action Pokémon Detective Pikachu movie, which is opening in theaters in a few more weeks. From director Rob Letterman, the movie is set deep in the Pokemon world, and stars the voice of Ryan Reynolds as the "hilariously wise-cracking, adorable super-sleuth" Detective Pikachu. This also co-stars Justice Smith as Tim, Kathryn Newton as Lucy, plus Ken Watanabe, Suki Waterhouse, Omar Chaparro, Chris Geere, and Bill Nighy. Along with all kinds of charming (and badass) Pokemon creatures, which you'll see a few glimpses of here. This is pretty much the perfect trailer, set to Louis Armstrong's "What a Wonderful World", with some of the most emotional shots from this movie yet. Grab yourself a tissue before you watch. Here's the "What a Pikachu
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Touching New ‘Detective Pikachu’ Trailer Reveals ‘Wonderful World’ of Pokemon (Video)

Touching New ‘Detective Pikachu’ Trailer Reveals ‘Wonderful World’ of Pokemon (Video)
So far the teasers for “Detective Pikachu” have played up the manic energy and cuteness of talking, fuzzy, pocket monsters. But in the latest trailer shared by Ryan Reynolds on Monday, we see that the Pokemon universe is actually a pretty beautiful and remarkable place to explore.

There’s no battles here, but there’s certainly a lot of heart. Scored to the Louis Armstrong classic “What a Wonderful World,” we see not only skies of blue in the latest “Detective Pikachu” trailer but also Charmander and Bulbasaur frolicking in the woods as star Justice Smith gets a taste of a world he hardly knew existed.

“Listen kid, if your dad was here, he would hug you so hard, your bones would pop,” a teary-eyed Pikachu (as voiced by Reynolds) says to Smith.

Also Read: Mewtwo Appears for Battle in New 'Pokemon: Detective Pikachu' Trailer (Video)

“Pokemon: Detective Pikachu” is
See full article at The Wrap »

‘Minding the Gap,’ ‘A Dangerous Son’ Among 2019 Peabody Documentary Honorees

  • Variety
‘Minding the Gap,’ ‘A Dangerous Son’ Among 2019 Peabody Documentary Honorees
A Dangerous Son,” “The Facebook Dilemma,” “Independent Lens: Dolores,” “Independent Lens: The Judge,” “The Jazz Ambassadors,” “Lorraine Hansberry: Sighted Eyes/Feeling Heart,” “Minding the Gap” and “Pov: The Apology” have been selected as the documentary winners at the 2019 Peabody Awards, Variety has learned.

The Peabody Awards Board of Jurors also named Kartemquin Films the winner of an Institutional Award for the company’s commitment to “unflinching documentary filmmaking,” as well as telling an “American history rooted in social justice and the stories of the marginalized.”

Kartemquin was founded as a non-profit collective in 1966 and has served as a home for filmmakers to develop their craft and produce films that promote dialogue and democracy ever since. The company is behind projects such as “Hoop Dreams,” in addition to this year’s Peabody winner “Minding the Gap.”

The eight documentary honorees, part of the Peabody 30, highlights stories centered on women, mental illness,
See full article at Variety »
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