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Moonfleet

It’s Fritz Lang versus CinemaScope, for the first and last time. The format suited to snakes and funerals effectively hamstrings the great filmmaker’s expressive camera direction, yet the movie is one of the best of MGM’s last-gasp ’50s costume dramas. Corrupt smuggler Stewart Granger is redeemed by the faith of a young boy who believes in him; in this story the words “He’s my friend” take on a big significance. Come see director Lang struggle to adapt the wide-wide screen to accommodate his brand of real cinema.

Moonfleet

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1955 / Color / 2:55 widescreen / 87 min. / Street Date August 13, 2019 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Stewart Granger, Jon Whiteley, George Sanders, Joan Greenwood, Viveca Lindfors, Liliane Montevecchi, Melville Cooper, Sean McClory, Alan Napier, John Hoyt, Donna Corcoran, Jack Elam, Dan Seymour, Ian Wolfe.

Cinematography: Robert H. Planck

Film Editor: Albert Akst

Original Music: Miklos Rozsa

Written by Jan Lustig,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

David Fincher Is the Latest Acclaimed Film Director to Make a Netflix Movie

David Fincher Is the Latest Acclaimed Film Director to Make a Netflix Movie
David Fincher has jumped on the Netflix bandwagon to direct his first feature film in five years.

The Oscar-nominated director, 56, has quite the successful resume, most notably his work on films like Zodiac, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and The Social Network.

As Variety reported, Fincher’s latest film, titled Mank, is a biopic revolving around Citizen Kane screenwriter Herman Mankiewicz, and is based upon a script that Fincher’s late father Jack created before he died in 2003.

Gary Oldman is set to portray the titular role, Variety reported.

Sources told the outlet that while plot details remain vague,
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Alexandra Silber, Frances Ruffelle & More Set for Nell Gwynn Reading

The Acting Company Founded by John Houseman and Margot Harley Ian Belknap, Artistic Director Elisa Spencer-Kaplan, Executive Director announced casting today for the next reading in the 23rd John McDonald Salon Reading Series, Jessica Swale's Olivier Award-winning, music-filled comedy Nell Gwynn. The reading will take place on Monday, June 24 at 7 Pm at the Mainstage Theater at Playwrights Horizons 416 W. 42nd Street, New York, NY. Tickets are available now online at www.theactingcompany.org.
See full article at BroadwayWorld.com »

Herman Wouk Dies: ‘The Winds Of War’ & ‘The Caine Mutiny’ Author Was 103

Herman Wouk Dies: ‘The Winds Of War’ & ‘The Caine Mutiny’ Author Was 103
Herman Wouk, who authored books that became legendary films and TV programs including The Caine Mutiny and The Winds of War, died today in his sleep in Palm Springs, the Associated Press reports. He was 103.

Wouk published about a dozen novels and a handful of plays and nonfiction books during a 70-year career, and many became landmark screen adaptations. His World War II novel The Winds of War hit bookstores in 1971 and was followed by the 1978 sequel War and Remembrance. Both were turned into smash ABC miniseries — with Winds of War airing in 1983 and War and Remembrance in 1988. Both starred Robert Mitchum as Capt. Victor “Pug” Henry and earned multiple Emmys.

Born on May 27, 1915 in the Bronx, Wouk — like so many other young Americans — join the Armed Forces after Pearl Harbor, serving in the Navy. He began writing while off watch aboard ship. And his best-known works chronicled seaman during
See full article at Deadline »

Sam Elliott would enter the record books with a Best Supporting Actor Oscar win

Sam Elliott would enter the record books with a Best Supporting Actor Oscar win
The Best Supporting Actor Oscar category notoriously skews old — the top 10 oldest are at least 70 with an average of 75.1. That average could tick up this year if the statuette goes to Sam Elliott (“A Star Is Born”), who would be the sixth oldest supporting actor champ ever.

Elliott will be 74 years and 199 days old on Oscar night, and he would knock back Jack Palance (“City Slickers,” 1991) who was 73 years and 41 days old when he showed off his one-handed push-up prowess. The category’s oldest winner, of course, is Christopher Plummer, who was 82 years and 75 days old when he triumphed for “Beginners” (2011) and is also the oldest acting winner in any category. Plummer dethroned George Burns, who was the only other octogenarian supporting actor champ at 80 years and 69 days.

See ‘A Star Is Born’ at the Oscars: How did each version fare with the academy?

Often nicknamed the Career Achievement Award
See full article at Gold Derby »

Sam Elliott (‘A Star Is Born’) would be 6th oldest Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner

Sam Elliott (‘A Star Is Born’) would be 6th oldest Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner
The Best Supporting Actor Oscar race could be one for the ages. Timothee Chalamet (“Beautiful Boy”) could become the second youngest winner in the category, but on the other end of the spectrum, Sam Elliott (“A Star Is Born”) could become one of the oldest.

Elliott, who will be 74 years and 199 days old on the Feb. 24 ceremony, would become the sixth oldest Best Supporting Actor champ, dethroning Jack Palance who was 73 years and 41 days old when he did those one-handed push-ups. He’d be a few years off of the fifth spot, held by “Cocoon” (1981) Don Ameche, who was 77 years and 297 days old, and eight years shy of the record set by Christopher Plummer, who became the oldest acting winner in any category at 82 years and 75 days old when he prevailed for “Beginners” (2011).

See Sam Elliott (‘A Star Is Born’) on how he reacted when Bradley Cooper stole his voice
See full article at Gold Derby »

Oscar Flashback: ‘Psycho, ‘The Exorcist’ among the nominated horror films of the 1960s and 1970s

Oscar Flashback: ‘Psycho, ‘The Exorcist’ among the nominated horror films of the 1960s and 1970s
This article marks Part 2 of the Gold Derby series reflecting on Horror Films at the Oscars. Join us as we look back at the spine-tingling movies that earned Academy Awards nominations, including the following films from the 1960s and 1970s.

Alfred Hitchcock‘s “Psycho” (1960) was met with enormous critical and commercial success upon release emerging the second-highest grossing film of the year, just behind Stanley Kubrick‘s “Spartacus.” Alas, the film was also greeted to a somewhat cool reception at the Oscars. “Psycho” did muster four nominations, in Best Director (Hitchcock’s fifth and final career bid), Best Supporting Actress (Janet Leigh), Best Art Direction and Best Cinematography. Notably absent was Anthony Perkins, unforgettable as Norman Bates. Leigh, who won the Golden Globe for her performance, was ultimately defeated by Shirley Jones (“Elmer Gantry”). The film also failed to win on any of its other three nominations.

The following year,
See full article at Gold Derby »

Christopher Reeve — His Legacy As Superman And Beyond Lives On (Exclusive)

When considering that this week would have been Christopher Reeve's 66th birthday, we find ourselves reflecting on an interview he gave in which a reporter asked, “How do you define a hero?” Christopher considered the question a moment before responding. Finally he noted, “For me, personally, a hero is somebody who will make sacrifices for others without expecting a reward.” “Superman is all that,” mused the interviewer. “That’s what I try to play,” Christopher replied. Then came the biggie: “How about Christopher Reeve? Is he a hero?" The answer was an honest one. “I don’t know,” he said. “I can’t start leaping to those conclusions.” (Photo Credit: Warner Bros) Thankfully, the rest of the world can and did, given the global response to the actor’s passing on Oct. 10, 2004, nearly a decade after the horseback riding accident that paralyzed him from the neck down. Lesser men might have given up,
See full article at Closer Weekly »

Death in Small Doses

This ’50s drug epic is not about hopheads on dope, but working folk frying their brains on amphetamines. Peter Graves’ undercover narc seeks the source of deadly pills that are wreaking havoc in the trucking industry; the film’s wild card is an unhinged Chuck Connors — yes, that Chuck Connors — as a deranged pill-popper running amuck on the highways. Seat belts recommended.

Death in Small Doses

DVD

The Warner Archive Collection

1957 / B&W / 1:85 enhanced widescreen / 79 min. / Street Date January 8, 2013 / available through the WBshop / 17.99

Starring: Peter Graves, Mala Powers, Chuck Connors, Merry Anders, Roy, Roy Engel, Robert Williams, Harry Lauter, Claire Carleton, John Dierkes, Robert Shayne.

Cinematography: Carl Guthrie

Film Editor: William Austin

Original Music: Robert Wiley Miller, Emil Newman

Written by John McGreevy, from an article by Arthur L. Davis

Produced by Richard V. Heermance

Directed by Joseph M. Newman

The picture that crosses the forbidden territory… of Thrill Pills!
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Exclusive Interview – Mr. Mercedes showrunner Jack Bender talks Season 2

Paul Risker chats with Mr. Mercedes showrunner Jack Bender about season 2 of the Stephen King adaptation…

Mr Mercedes, an adaptation of Stephen King’s Bill Hodges Trilogy, comprising Mr. Mercedes, Finders Keepers and End of Watch, enters its second season.

Brady Hartsfield (Harry Treadaway) remains hospitalised in a vegetative state after a second attempt to perpetrate a mass murder was thwarted by retired detective Bill Hodges (Brendon Gleeson). Opening private investigative agency Finders Keepers with Holly Gibney (Justine Lupe), Hodges is unable to put aside his suspicions that Brady is somehow behind the strange occurrences affecting hospital staff.

Executive producer Jack Bender, who was also behind the adaptation of King’s Under the Dome, began acting in theatre and television before transitioning to directing. This path would lead him to direct episodes of noteworthy shows that include: Alias, Ally McBeal, The Sopranos, Carnivale, Lost and Game of Thrones.

In conversation with Flickering Myth,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Bharat Nalluri To Direct ‘We Interrupt This Program’ On Chaotic Orson Welles’ ‘War Of The Worlds’ Broadcast

  • Deadline
Bharat Nalluri To Direct ‘We Interrupt This Program’ On Chaotic Orson Welles’ ‘War Of The Worlds’ Broadcast
Exclusive: Bharat Nalluri is attached to direct We Interrupt This Program, a drama financed by Echo Lake Entertainment that focuses on the internal battles between Orson Welles and producer John Houseman that nearly derailed the shocking radio broadcast of War of the Worlds in 1938. Without identifying they were performing a sci-fi play, the broadcast panicked listeners into believing an alien invasion was taking place.

Sean Sorensen wrote the spec script, and Echo Lake’s Doug Mankoff and Andy Spaulding are producing with the writer.

The script explores two dramas unfolding on the night of October 30, 1938. The most well-known is the infamous radio broadcast, where the specter of invading aliens sent shockwaves of panic rippling across America. But even more chaos was taking place behind the scenes because of the stormy relationship between broadcast producer Houseman and Welles, its petulant director and star, that nearly derailed the most influential radio broadcast in history.
See full article at Deadline »

Cradle Will Rock

Writer-director Tim Robbins goes all out to recreate a politically potent chapter of Broadway legend, the true story of the rebel Wpa production The Cradle Will Rock — with a dynamic sidebar about Diego Rivera’s provocative mural for the Rockefeller Center. An enormous cast works up the excitement of Depression-era revolutionary theater.

Cradle Will Rock

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1999 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 134 min. / Street Date August 7, 2018 / available through Kino Lorber / 19.95

Starring: Hank Azaria, Rubén Blades, Joan Cusack, John Cusack, Cary Elwes, Philip Baker Hall, Cherry Jones, Angus Macfadyen, Bill Murray, Vanessa Redgrave, Susan Sarandon, Jamey Sheridan, John Turturro, Emily Watson, Bob Balaban, Jack Black, Kyle Gass, Paul Giamatti, Barnard Hughes, Barbara Sukowa, Gretchen Mol, Harris Yulin, Daniel Jenkins, Steven Skybell, Susan Heimbeinder, Audra McDonald, Leonardo Cimino.

Cinematography: Jean-Yves Escoffier

Film Editor: Geraldine Peroni

Costumes: Ruth Myers

Original Music: David Robbins

Produced by Lydia Dean Pilcher, Jon Kilik, Tim Robbins

Written
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Vincenzo Labella, Writer-Producer of ‘Marco Polo,’ Dies at 93

  • Variety
Vincenzo Labella, Writer-Producer of ‘Marco Polo,’ Dies at 93
Vincenzo Labella, who wrote and produced the Emmy-winning miniseries “Marco Polo” and produced the miniseries “Jesus of Nazareth,’ died in Los Angeles on July 28. He was 93.

Labella was born in Vatican City, where his father was the dean of the Pontifical Halls. Having spent his childhood with access to the Apostolic Library of the Vatican, he started out as a historian, journalist and documentarian.

Producer Dino De Laurentiis asked him to serve as advisor on the 1961 film “Barabbas,” a job which led to many other history-based projects.

Franco Zeffirelli directed the 1977 NBC mini “Jesus of Nazareth,” which starred Robert Powell, Laurence Olivier, Anne Bancroft and Christopher Plummer, and was Emmy-nommed as outstanding special drama.

He also produced “Moses the Lawgiver,” starring Burt Lancaster, which started as a six-hour series and was also released as a feature film.

NBC’s 1982 “Marco Polo” was the first Western production to film in the
See full article at Variety »

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1970s: Robert De Niro, Joel Grey, Christopher Walken … ? [Poll]

Who’s your favorite Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1970s: Robert De Niro, Joel Grey, Christopher Walken … ? [Poll]
The 1970s provided many older actors with their first Oscars, particularly in Best Supporting Actor. The decade also included what remains the only instance of an actor winning back-to-back Oscars in a supporting category. So which Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of the 1970s do you like the best? Look back at each year’s winner and be sure to vote in the poll below!

John Mills, “Ryan’s Daughter” (1970) — Mills started the decade off with an Oscar win for playing the town fool Michael who uncovers a secret in “Ryan’s Daughter.” This was Mills’ only Oscar nomination and win, despite a very long career in film and television.

SEEJack Nicholson (‘Terms of Endearment’) blasts off after being voted top Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner of 1980s [Poll Results]

Ben Johnson, “The Last Picture Show” (1971) — Johnson would win his Oscar for “The Last Picture Show” in which he plays Sam the Lion,
See full article at Gold Derby »

2 Weeks in Another Town

A quick Jet-set ride takes us to Rome of 1962, which for a couple of years was the movie capital of the world. Washed-up actor Kirk Douglas reinvents himself amid the vipers of his past — an abusive director (Edward G. Robinson), a medusa-like ex-wife (Cyd Charisse) and a parade of show-biz creeps that want him to fail and grovel. But wait — redemption springs eternal through the love of a simple innocent unspoiled Italiana with no agenda of her own (Daliah Lavi). Will Douglas be reborn? Director Vincente Minnelli tries his hardest to get MGM in on the Italian art-movie gold rush.

2 Weeks in Another Town

Blu-ray

The Warner Archive Collection

1962 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 107 min. / Street Date June 19, 2018 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Kirk Douglas, Edward G. Robinson, Cyd Charisse, George Hamilton, Daliah Lavi, Claire Trevor, Rosanna Schiaffino, James Gregory, Joanna Roos, George Macready, Mino Doro, Stefan Schnabel, Vito Scotti, Leslie Uggams.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

CAA Signs ‘24’ And ‘BlacKkKlansman’ Star Corey Hawkins

  • Deadline
Exclusive: CAA just signed Corey Hawkins, who starred in Fox’s 24: Legacy after a breakout turn as Dr Dre in Straight Outta Compton. Hawkins made the move from ICM Partners after starring as civil rights leader Stokley Carmichael in BlacKkKlansman, the Spike Lee-directed film that just won the Grand Prix at Cannes and is set for release in August by Focus Features.

Hawkins next will be seen starring with Annette Bening and Vanessa Redgrave in Christoph Waltz’s directorial debut Georgetown. He also co-starred in Kong: Skull Island and became a popular character on The Walking Dead, until his Heath character went missing and was feared to have become zombie chow. Showrunners have hinted that he might return.

He is a classically trained graduate of Julliard, where he received the prestigious John Houseman Prize for excellence in classical theatre. He was also a 2017 Tony Award nominee for Best
See full article at Deadline »

M*A*S*H Actor and musician David Ogden Stiers dies, aged 75

Tony Sokol Mar 5, 2018

David Ogden Stiers played Major Winchester on M*A*S*H, and made a real contribution to the classical music his character loved.

David Ogden Stiers, best known for playing Major Charles Emerson Winchester III in M*A*S*H and Cogsworth in Disney's Beauty & The Beast, died, according to Variety. The actor’s agent Mitchell Stubbs tweeted that Stiers died after a battle with bladder cancer at his home in Newport, Oregon, on Saturday. He was 75.

Stiers joined the Korean War comedy M*A*S*H in 1977, replacing Larry Linville’s officious Major Frank Burns with aristocratic arrogance and a Harvard accent. Stiers was nominated for two Emmy Awards for outstanding supporting actor in a comedy or variety or music series, in 1981 and 1982, for the role of Major Winchester. He was nominated for a third Emmy for his role as William Milligan Sloane, founder of the U.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Letter from an Unknown Woman

This devastating romantic melodrama is Max Ophüls’ best American picture — perhaps because it seems so European? It’s probably Joan Fontaine’s finest hour as well, and Louis Jourdan comes across as a great actor in a part perfect for his screen personality. The theme could be called, ‘No regrets,’ but also, ‘Everything is to be regretted.’

Letter from an Unknown Woman

Blu-ray

Olive Signature

1948 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 87 min. / Street Date December 5, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Joan Fontaine, Louis Jourdan, Mady Christians, Marcel Journet, Art Smith, Carol Yorke, Howard Freeman, John Good, Leo B. Pessin, Erskine Sanford, Otto Waldis, Sonja Bryden.

Cinematography: Franz Planer

Film Editor: Ted J. Kent

Original Music: Daniele Amfitheatrof

Written by Howard Koch from a story by Stefan Zweig

Produced by John Houseman

Directed by Max Ophüls

A young woman’s romantic nature goes beyond all limits, probing the nature of True Love.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

We Interrupt This Program to explore Orson Welles’ War of the Worlds radio drama

In 1938, Orson Welles caused nationwide panic with his special Halloween episode of The Mercury Theatre on Air, with many listeners confusing his radio adaptation of H.G. WellsThe War of the Worlds for news of a real alien invasion. And now the story behind the drama looks to be heading to the big screen.

According to Deadline, Echo Lake Entertainment is teaming up with Sean Sorensen’s Royal Viking Entertainment for the feature film We Interrupt This Program. Based on Sorensen’s spec script, the film will “chronicle the stormy struggle taking place behind the scenes between Welles and his producer, John Houseman, as they pulled off what would become the most influential radio broadcast in history”, as well as detailed the chaos that ensued as it was broadcast.

The site reports that the project is now out to directors, and will shoot in 2018.
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

John Carpenter's '80s: "The Fog" and "Escape From New York"

  • MUBI
John Carpenter's The Fog (1980) is playing from September 9 - October 8 and Escape from New York (1981) from September 10 - October 9, 2017 in the United States as part of the series John Carpenter's '80s.A golden pocket watch hangs on the right side of the movie’s frame like a broken pendulum, or maybe a man from the gallows. It sways gently, showing five minutes before midnight. With laconic eyes and the careful accentuation of a raconteur, Mr. Michen (John Houseman) recounts to a gaggle of kids the moribund story of the Elizabeth Dane, a clipper ship captained by a wealthy man named Blake who had leprosy, and who wanted to set up a leper colony in Northern California. The ship, beset by a sudden fog bank, sailed towards a campfire mistaken for a lighthouse and crashed into the rocks. None survived. The story, which has been passed down from grandfathers to fathers to sons,
See full article at MUBI »
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