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Living the story by Anne-Katrin Titze

Claude Lelouch on influencing Terrence Malick: "I'm happy that you say so." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

When I spoke with Claude Lelouch at his hotel in New York less than two years ago, he believed that The Best Years Of A Life (Les Plus Belles Années D'Une Vie), starring Jean-Louis Trintignant, Anouk Aimée, and Monica Bellucci would be his last.

Now he has La Vertu Des Impondérables with Elsa Zylberstein (Un + une with Jean Dujardin and Christopher Lambert), Marianne Denicourt, Ary Abittan, and Stéphane De Groodt (Israel Horovitz's My Old Lady) in the works.

Claude Lelouch: "In Un Homme Et Une Femme (A Man And A Woman), when Anouk Aimée arrives at the end on the train platform, she didn't know Jean-Louis Trintignant would be there."

In 1966, Un Homme Et Une Femme won the Cannes Palme d'Or, and in 1967 won the Best Foreign Language Film Oscar, and Claude Lelouch took Best Writing,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Best Years of a Life’

Cannes Film Review: ‘The Best Years of a Life’
Something unusual happened at the Cannes premiere of “The Best Years of a Life,” Claude Lelouch’s syrupy second sequel to his trend-setting 1966 global smash “A Man and a Woman.” Not the endless, roaring standing ovation that happened when the lights came up: That’s expected, even required, of the tuxed-up crowd at Grand Théâtre Lumière, for films far better and worse than this light fondant fancy. No, it came just after, as the applause eventually faded out and the vast audience harmonized in collective gibberish sing-song: Chaba-daba-da-daba-daba-da, da-da-da chaba-daba-da… — over and over, until beachside revelers some distance away could probably hear this mass karaoke spin on Francis Lai’s original 1966 love theme drifting on the breeze.

It was a sweet, decidedly uncool moment that emphasized what Lelouch’s sweet, decidedly uncool film really is: not so much a freestanding feature as an unadulterated nostalgia trip, its modest effect dependent
See full article at Variety »

Other Angle Pictures racks up sales on Claude Lelouch’s 'The Best Years Of A Life' (exclusive)

The film premiered Out of Competition at Cannes.

Paris-based Other Angle Pictures has unveiled a slew of sales on French director Claude Lelouch’s The Best Years Of A Life, following its Out of Competition premiere in Cannes.

The film reunites Lelouch with actors Anouk Aimée and Jean-Louis Trintignant in the follow-up to his Palme d’Or, Academy Award, and Golden Globe-winning 1966 romantic drama A Man And A Woman. The trio – all now in their 80s - hit Cannes’s red carpet together again some 52 years after the premiere of the original film.

In Europe, the film has sold to
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Lelouch goes back to the future in Cannes by Richard Mowe

Together again after all these years - Anouk Aimée and Claude Lelouch Photo: Richard Mowe There can be no doubting the waves of emotion that washed over director Claude Lelouch and his two actors Jean-Louis Trintignant and Anouk Aimée when they returned to the Cannes Film Festival with The Best Years Of A Life.

The new film - which also stars Monica Bellucci - picks up where the same characters left off their love story in A Man And A Woman some 53 years earlier and gives them a fresh start.

Lelouch confides that in those far-off days he did not really understand what was happening to him. He received the Palme d’Or and the film travelled around the world. It mixed black-and-white and colour images, hailed as a revolutionary technique but it was brought about by the exigencies of the budget.

Claude Lelouch: 'Every time I make a new
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

‘The Best Years of a Life’ Review: A Corny Sequel to ‘A Man and a Woman’ — Cannes

‘The Best Years of a Life’ Review: A Corny Sequel to ‘A Man and a Woman’ — Cannes
In one of the more poignant moments from Richard Linklater’s “Before Midnight,” chatty couple Celine and Jesse imagine what it might be like to look back on their romance 80 years in the future. It’s a tantalizing speculation in a triptych rich with possibilities. Now, Claude Lelouch gets there with a trilogy of his own: In “The Best Years of a Life,” the 81-year-old French director revisits the swooning courtship from his Oscar-winning 1966 “A Man and a Woman,” concluding a cheesy opus that launched more than 50 years ago.

Decades before Celine and Jesse, there was the saga of Jean-Louis and Anne. With fellow octogenarians Jean-Louis Trintignant and Anouk Aimée reprising their roles as passionate lovers despite forces that pull them apart, “The Best Years of a Life” delivers a melancholic salute to the original movie. However, Lelouch’s obsession with his story’s legacy means that the movie often
See full article at Indiewire »

First trailer: Claude Lelouch's Cannes title 'The Best Years Of A Life' (exclusive)

First trailer: Claude Lelouch's Cannes title 'The Best Years Of A Life' (exclusive)
The film premieres Out of Competition today (May 18).

Screen can exclusively reveal the first English-language trailer for Claude Lelouch’s The Best Years Of A Life ahead of its Out of Competition premiere at Cannes this evening (May 18).

The film reunites Lelouch with legendary actors Anouk Aimée and Jean-Louis Trintignant in the follow-up to his Palme d’Or, Academy Award, Golden Globe-winning 1966 romantic drama A Man And A Woman.

Speaking to Screen in Cannes ahead of Saturday’s premiere, Lelouch revealed it had been a challenge to convince Aimée and Trintignant, who are both now in their late 80s, to come on board the project.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Claude Lelouch reveals details on his next film, a 'La La Land'-style "musical comedy" (exclusive)

Claude Lelouch reveals details on his next film, a 'La La Land'-style
The film has finished shooting, with editing about to begin.

Claude Lelouch, who hits the red carpet today with Out Of Competition title The Best Years Of Life starring Anouk Aimée and Jean-Louis Trintignant, has revealed fresh details about his next film La Vertu De L’Impondérable.

“It’s shot and I head into the editing suite next week to complete it,” Lelouch told Screen.

“It’s a musical comedy and my response to [Damien] Chazelle’s La La Land, which I really loved.”

Lelouch said it arose from his belief suffering can be a life-affirming experience.

“It revolves around an
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Other Angle Pictures boards Claude Lelouch's 'The Best Years Of A Life' (exclusive)

‘I was extraordinarily lucky to have waited fifty-two years to make this film.’

Paris-based Other Angle Pictures has boarded world sales on French director Claude Lelouch’s The Best Years Of A Life ahead of its Out of Competition premiere at the Cannes Film Festival.

The film reunites Lelouch with legendary actors Anouk Aimée and Jean-Louis Trintignant in the follow-up to his Palme d’Or, Academy Award, Golden Globe-winning 1966 romantic drama A Man And A Woman.

Its storyline revisits the original characters of Anne Gauthier and Jean-Louis Duroc – a script girl and a racing driver who embark on a hesitant
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'The Sisters Brothers' wins top prize at France's Lumière awards

'The Sisters Brothers' wins top prize at France's Lumière awards
Jacques Audiard’s dark comedy western won best film and best director.

Jacques Audiard’s dark comedy western The Sisters Brothers, co-starring John C. Reilly and Joaquin Phoenix, won best film and best director at the 24th edition of France’s Lumière awards on Monday evening.

In a third prize for Audiard’s English-language debut, Benoît Debie, who was also nominated for his work on Gaspar Noé’s Climax, won best cinematography.

The Sisters Brothers was a front-runner at the nomination stage alongside comedy of manners Mademoiselle de Joncquières, adoption drama Pupille and Venice-winning divorce drama Custody although there were no stand-out favourites this year.
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Here’s Why ‘Roma’ Could Be the First Foreign-Language Oscar Winner for Best Picture

  • Indiewire
Here’s Why ‘Roma’ Could Be the First Foreign-Language Oscar Winner for Best Picture
Alfonso Cuaron’s “Roma” has tied “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” with 10 Oscar nominations, the most ever for a non-English language contender. This comes on the heels of wins from the New York and Los Angeles critics’ groups, along with multiple guild nominations, and a best director Golden Globes award. What once looked like a streaming-service outlier is now a serious, if not leading, contender to win the industry’s top award.

In the nine-decade history of the Academy, no foreign-language film has ever won. Nine foreign-language films received five or more nominations among all categories (some — but not all — included Foreign Language Film). Of these, perhaps two — “Z” and “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” — had a legitimate shot at winning Best Picture.

The ascension of “Roma” isn’t certain. It’s receiving limited theatrical play, and is streaming worldwide on Netflix — although that’s something that didn’t dissuade the Academy in its nominations.
See full article at Indiewire »

Turin Film Fest to Pay Tribute to Bernardo Bertolucci With Day of Screenings

Turin Film Fest to Pay Tribute to Bernardo Bertolucci With Day of Screenings
The Turin Film Festival on Saturday announced it will hold a day of tribute to Bernardo Bertolucci, the Oscar-winning Italian director who died Nov. 26.

The 36th edition of the event will conclude Sunday with a day of screenings dedicated to the master in Turin's Cinema Massimo.

The fest will screen three of Bertolucci’s works, including 1900, the 1976 historical drama starring Robert De Niro, Gérard Depardieu, Burt Lancaster and Donald Sutherland); 1970's The Conformist, starring Jean-Louis Trintignant, Stefania Sandrelli, Dominique Sanda and Gastone Moschin; and 1996's Stealing Beauty, starring Liv Tyler, Jeremy Irons, Sinead Cusack and Rachel ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

Peter Travers on Bernardo Bertolucci: A Provocateur Whose Films Inspire Awe

Peter Travers on Bernardo Bertolucci: A Provocateur Whose Films Inspire Awe
The first time I met the rabblerousing Italian director Bernardo Bertolucci, he was searching for a word, rubbing two fingers together as if to spark a thought. “I think — how do I put it? — that the word is texture. You know, how a movie feels when you hold it in your head and run it through all your own life experience. So there’s depth to it. And politics. And sex. And, if you’re lucky, maybe magic.”

Bertolucci, who died on Monday at 77, spent his last few years with
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Nicolas Roeg, Bernardo Bertolucci and Another End of Another Era

Nicolas Roeg, Bernardo Bertolucci and Another End of Another Era
It’s always tough when giants shuffle off this mortal coil, but the twofer that hit film fans over the past few days has been a particularly hard blow. Early Saturday morning, word began to spread that Nicolas Roeg, the filmmaker behind The Man Who Fell to Earth, among others, had died at the age of 90. Then, just as folks were logging on to their computers today after a long holiday weekend, it was confirmed that Bernardo Bertolucci, the Oscar-winning director who helped channel what’s arguably Marlon Brando’s
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Bernardo Bertolucci Dies: Italian Director Of ‘The Last Emperor’ & ‘Last Tango In Paris’ Was 77

  • Deadline
Bernardo Bertolucci Dies: Italian Director Of ‘The Last Emperor’ & ‘Last Tango In Paris’ Was 77
Bernardo Bertolucci, a towering figure of world cinema, has died aged 77.

The influential Italian auteur, perhaps best known for epic The Last Emperor, which won nine Oscars, and groundbreaking works such as Last Tango In Paris and The Conformist, has passed away in Rome following a battle with cancer his publicist has confirmed.

Bertolucci was a key figure in the extraordinary Italian cinema of the 1960s and early 1970s but also made a successful transition to big canvas Hollywood filmmaking with 1987’s The Last Emperor, whose Oscars included Best Picture and Best Director for Bertolucci.

Bertolucci was born in the Italian city of Parma in 1941, the son of a poet and teacher. His father was friends with future avant-garde filmmaker Pier Paolo Pasolini, then a novelist and poet, and Pasolino hired the 20-year-old Bertolucci as his assistant on his 1961 debut, Accattone. Bertolucci made his own directorial debut on 1962 feature La
See full article at Deadline »

Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘The Last Emperor,’ Dies at 77

  • Variety
Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘The Last Emperor,’ Dies at 77
Bernardo Bertolucci, whose epic “The Last Emperor” won nine Oscars and who influenced generations of filmmakers with other groundbreaking works such as “The Conformist” and “Last Tango in Paris,” in which he explored politics and sexuality through personal storytelling and audacious camera work, has died. He was 77.

His publicist, Flavia Schiavi, said Bertolucci died at his home in Rome at 7 a.m. Monday. He had been suffering from cancer.

Italy’s greatest auteur of his generation, Bertolucci managed to work both in Europe and Hollywood, though his relationship with the studios had its ups and downs. But even when he operated within the studio system, Bertolucci always managed to make films that were considered projections of his inner world.

The Last Emperor,” an adaptation of the autobiography of China’s last imperial ruler, Pu Yi, swept the 1987 Oscars, winning every category in which it had been nominated, including best picture and best director.
See full article at Variety »

13 Scariest Scenes in Non-Horror Movies

Paul Bradshaw Oct 30, 2018

Because it’s so much worse when you don't see it coming…

This article comes from Den of Geek UK.

You know what you’re in for when you go and see a horror movie. Scary films usually have scary titles and scary posters so everyone knows that they’re going to get jumped, spooked or grossed-out for the next two hours. If you don't like horror movies, it’s pretty easy to avoid them.

But that’s not always the case. It might be a kid’s movie, an indie drama, an action blockbuster or a sweet family comedy, but you’re never completely safe from horror when you go to the cinema. Here we round up the scariest scenes in films that generally weren’t meant to be scary – the unintentional horror moments that caught us off guard.

Trainspotting (1996)

The baby on the ceiling

If
See full article at Den of Geek »

Giveaway: Win Corbucci's The Great Silence On Blu-ray

We've teamed up with Film Movement Classics to offer up to you one of three copies of Sergio Corbucci's classic Western, The Great Silence. Widely recognized as one of the greatest spaghetti Westerns ever made, The Great Silence has been remastered by Film Movement from a brand new 2K scan and released on Blu-ray this month. Here are the details of this marvelous disc: Synopsis   This June, Film Movement Classics commemorates the landmark spaghetti western, The Great Silence, with a stunning 50th Anniversary Restoration. Restored in 2K from original elements, the film, heralded as "one of the finest westerns ever[1]," directed by Sergio Corbucci and starring Jean-Louis Trintignant and Klaus Kinski will be available for cineastes everywhere in both Blu-ray and DVD formats. The...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Giveaway: Win Corbucci's The Great Silence On Blu-ray

We've teamed up with Film Movement Classics to offer up to you one of three copies of Sergio Corbucci's classic Western, The Great Silence. Widely recognized as one of the greatest spaghetti Westerns ever made, The Great Silence has been remastered by Film Movement from a brand new 2K scan and released on Blu-ray this month. Here are the details of this marvelous disc: Synopsis   This June, Film Movement Classics commemorates the landmark spaghetti western, The Great Silence, with a stunning 50th Anniversary Restoration. Restored in 2K from original elements, the film, heralded as "one of the finest westerns ever[1]," directed by Sergio Corbucci and starring Jean-Louis Trintignant and Klaus Kinski will be available for cineastes everywhere in both Blu-ray and DVD formats. The...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »

Classic Spaghetti Western The Great Silence Screens at Webster University This Weekend

“They call him “Silence.” Because wherever he goes, the silence of death follows.”

The Great Silence (1968) directed by Sergio Corbucci, screens Friday June 29th through Sunday July 1st at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium (470 East Lockwood). The film starts at 7:30pm all three nights.

Sergio Corbucci’s masterpiece The Great Silence (1968) is more than just one of the greatest Westerns of all-time. Unlike Corbucci’s earlier classic Django (which recenetly played as part of Webster U’s ‘Strange Brew’ series), a violent Spaghetti Western filled with dark humor, The Great Silence is a downbeat and completely serious movie from beginning to end, a brutal tale about misery, greed and selfishness, about injustice and the desire for revenge.

The Great Silence is set in the winter of 1898, in the mountain town of Snow Hill, Utah. People who were forced to steal in order to survive an ice cold winter, are
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Sergio Corbucci's Classic Western, The Great Silence, Coming To Blu-ray From Film Movement Classics

Fresh from its critically lauded theatrical revival, Sergio Corbucci's classic Spaghetti Western The Great Silence is heading to home video from Film Movement Classics this June. Starring the great Klaus Kinski and Jean-Louis Trintignant in one of the bleakest of the Italian westerns ever made, The Great Silence has long been underappreciated in favor of the grander films of Sergio Leone and even Corbucci's flashier work, like Django. However, The Great Silence is often mentioned among the titans of the genre by fans who know, so it is very exciting to see this 2K restoration on its way to Blu-ray and DVD on June 5th.  Take a look at what's in store from the press release below "[Corbucci's] West was the most violent, surreal and...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...]
See full article at Screen Anarchy »
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