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Anna Karina, Catherine Deneuve: movies malign women by calling them muses

Male directors have often diminished the highly creative women who inspired them. Will the rise of female film-makers revolutionise the role of ‘muse’?

Amid tributes to Anna Karina, who died earlier this month, the word “muse” recurred. As in “the muse of Jean-Luc Godard” or “Karina served as a cinematic muse to Godard”. And in nearly every homage and obituary, you could sense the writer making a valiant effort to acknowledge that Karina was more than just a passive repository of a male auteur’s creativity: that she appeared in films by other renowned directors, starred in a TV musical (Anna) with songs by Serge Gainsbourg, made albums, did theatre, wrote and directed two films, and wrote four novels.

But it is Godard’s attempts to define and contain Karina’s allure that gives his early films much of their appeal. Time and again, the performer transcends her material, giving
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

How Anna Karina and Jean-Luc Godard Immortalized Each Other (Guest Column)

  • Variety
How Anna Karina and Jean-Luc Godard Immortalized Each Other (Guest Column)
With the passing of Anna Karina, a curtain has fallen on the French New Wave, that fabled cinematic movement that brought fame to the man who made her name, Jean-Luc Godard. Yes, Godard is still with us, as is “Breathless” star Jean-Paul Belmondo (practically the last of the living New Wave legends), but his moviemaking compatriots François Truffaut, Eric Rohmer, Jacques Rivette, Jacques Demy, and, most recently, Agnès Varda are gone, and with them the spirit of playful abandon that Karina perfectly embodied.

In such Godard classics as “A Woman is a Woman,” “Pierrot le Fou,” “Alphaville,” and “Made in USA,” Karina appeared as a gamine and a femme fatale at the same time. Not since Josef von Sternberg and Marlene Dietrich had there been a director-and-star tandem so potent. The closest to it would be Philippe Garrel’s partnership with Nico — although the avant-garde blue plate specials made by
See full article at Variety »

Anna Karina, Actress and French New Wave Icon, Dead at 79

Anna Karina, Actress and French New Wave Icon, Dead at 79
Anna Karina, the model-turned-actress who became a French New Wave icon thanks to her collaborations with the director Jean-Luc Godard, has died at the age of 79.

France’s cultural minister Franck Riester announced Karina’s death on Twitter, with the actress’ agent later confirming that Karina died Saturday in Paris following a battle with cancer.

“Her gaze was the gaze of the Nouvelle Vague (New Wave). It will remain so forever,” Riester wrote of Karina. “Today, French cinema has been orphaned. It has lost one of its legends.”

Born Hanne
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Anna Karina, French New Wave Star and Jean-Luc Godard Collaborator, Dies at 79

  • Variety
Anna Karina, French New Wave Star and Jean-Luc Godard Collaborator, Dies at 79
French New Wave star Anna Karina, who served as a muse for Jean-Luc Godard and appeared in eight of his films, has died. She was 79.

France’s culture minister, Franck Reister, announced her death in a tweet, as did her agent, Laurent Balandras, who attributed the cause as cancer.

“Her gaze was the gaze of the New Wave. It will remain so forever,” wrote Reister. “She magnetized the entire world. Today, French cinema is an orphan. It loses one of its legends.”

Karina’s best known roles include “The Little Soldier,” “Vivre sa vie,” “Band of Outsiders,” “Pierrot le Fou,” and “Alphaville,” all throughout the 1960s. She starred in “A Woman Is a Woman,” as well, in a performance that earned her the silver bear award for best actress at the Berlin Film Festival in 1961.

Karina also worked with other directors of the New Wave, including Agnes Varda, Jacques Rivette,
See full article at Variety »

Anna Karina Dies: Actress Who Symbolized The Nouvelle Vague In The 1960s Was 79

  • Deadline
Anna Karina Dies: Actress Who Symbolized The Nouvelle Vague In The 1960s Was 79
Anna Karina, the dark-haired and mysterious actress who became a symbol of France’s Nouvelle Vague thanks to her frequent appearances in Jean Luc Godard’s films, has died. She passed on Saturday in Paris from cancer at age 79, according to French officials and her agent.

The Danish-born actress was also a singer and author during her long career in the arts. Her1960s hits included Sous le Soleil Exactement and Roller Girl,” written by Serge Gainsbourg. Her four novels included Golden City.

Karina made her first film with Godard in Le Petit Soldat, a story of terrorism during the French-Algerian War. But because of censorship, the film was not released for three years. At that point, Karina had won the 1961 Best Actress Award at the Berlin International Film Festival for Godard’s Une Femme Est Une Femme.

Her other Godard films of the 1960s included Vivre Sa Vie, Bande à Part,
See full article at Deadline »

The Mustang Grows Up — And Goes Green

Since 1964, the Ford Mustang has been something of a pop culture icon: Steve McQueen drove a 1968 Mustang Gt in “Bullitt”; Serge Gainsbourg sung about making out in a Mustang; Vanilla Ice rapped about his rolling in his Mustang “5.0”. For over a half century, the performance coupe has been noteworthy for three reasons: it’s attainable, fast, and fun.

Now Ford is hoping to keep the car cool by going green, expanding the Mustang line with a new model called the Mustang Mach-e. It’s a double departure, of sorts: it
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Charlotte Gainsbourg: ‘Everything now is so politically correct. So boring’

The actor and singer grew up in her parents’ shadow, and starred in Lars Von Trier’s most extreme films. She talks about why she’s finally comfortable in her own skin

When Charlotte Gainsbourg was 16, she came home from school to find her mother distraught and the police waiting for her. They had just discovered that she was the target of a kidnapping plot. A gang of upper-class teenagers – journalists called them the blousons dorés (golden jacket) gangsters – had planned to kill a police officer and steal his uniform. Then, using this disguise, they were going to abduct Gainsbourg and demand a 5m franc ransom from her famous parents, Jane Birkin and Serge Gainsbourg. The gang, who had already committed several armed robberies, had found a country house where they were going to hide Gainsbourg. They had even bought shovels with which to bury the police officer.

Gainsbourg laughs
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

NYC Weekend Watch: Return of MoMA, Downtown Tokyo and More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of Modern Art

MoMA has reopened, and it is–I do not say this lightly–almost too much in one weekend. See for yourself.

Film Forum

“Shitamachi: Tales of Downtown Tokyo” begins with both canon and lesser-known Japanese cinema.

Films by Tim Burton and Joseph Losey play this weekend.

Metrograph

Films by Hitchcock and Blake Edwards play this weekend.
See full article at The Film Stage »

NYC Weekend Watch: ‘Sátántangó,’ Tales of Downtown Tokyo, Blake Edwards & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film at Lincoln Center

Béla Tarr’s monumental Sátántangó has been restored and plays daily.

Film Forum

“Shitamachi: Tales of Downtown Tokyo” begins with both canon and lesser-known Japanese cinema.

Films by Milos Forman and Joseph Losey play this weekend.

Metrograph

A Julie Andrews-curated selection of Blake Edwards films play this weekend.

A series
See full article at The Film Stage »

NYC Weekend Watch: Absurd Comedy, ‘Pola X,’ Bob Fosse & More

Since any New York City cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of the Moving Image

“No Joke: Absurd Comedy as Political Reality” commences with Xavier: Renegade Angel, Starship Troopers and more.

“See It Big! Ghost Stories” continues.

The Greek feature Electra plays this Sunday.

Film at Lincoln Center

Restorations of Le Professeur and Sergei Parajanov shorts play as part of the 57th New York Film Festival’s final weekend.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Reggae All-Stars Convene Soul Summit on ‘Red Gold Green & Blue’

Reggae All-Stars Convene Soul Summit on ‘Red Gold Green & Blue’
One of the greatest rhythm sections to ever rub-a-dub on planet Earth, Sly and Robbie’s client roster has included Dylan, Madonna, Serge Gainsbourg, and No Doubt. But the team’s best jams are the most deeply rooted in the Jamaican music they helped invent — at the core of Peter Tosh’s band; with the Compass Point All-Stars; and on their own Taxi Records sessions, source of some of the reggae canon’s mightiest sides. Their ur-grooves justify from the get-go Red Gold Green & Blue, a set of blues, r
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Tribeca, SXSW award-winners 'Initials S.G.', 'Alice', 'Tito' on Visit Films Cannes slate (exclusive)

Ryan Kampe to show teaser footage fromupcoming adventure doc The Sanctity Of Space, punk rock doc White Riot.

Ryan Kampe’s Visit Films heads to the Croisette with a bumper sales slate led by Tribeca Film Festival Nora Ephron Award winner Initials S.G.

The roster includes Tribeca selection Crshd, SXSW winners Alice, Saint Frances and Tito, SXSW selection The Wall Of Mexico, and Sundance selection Adam.

Visit will screen Lucía Garibaldi’s Sundance World Cinema Dramatic Competition best award-winner The Sharks, about a girl’s sexual awakening in a small beach town. Kampe will also present teaser footage from
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Review: Kate Bush’s ‘The Other Sides’ is a Motherlode of Must-Hear Rarities

Review: Kate Bush’s ‘The Other Sides’ is a Motherlode of Must-Hear Rarities
Like her American soulmate and former collaborator Prince, Kate Bush generated cartloads of top-flight recordings during her hypercreative peak years that, for whatever reasons, didn’t make it onto albums. This set finally bundles the evidence: 34 tracks, including some of the avant-pop auteur’s most gorgeous, extravagant, intimate, and bonkers material — b-sides, remixes, and an album’s-worth of stray, often strange covers.

Take the reading of “Rocket Man,” written by another soulmate, Elton John, arranged with fiddle and uilleann pipes into loping Celtic reggae (something to do, perhaps, with the “high as a kite” line?
See full article at Rolling Stone »

Tribeca Film Festival Unveils Feature Lineup, With Screen Time For John DeLorean, Muhammad Ali, Chelsea Manning

The 18th annual Tribeca Film Festival has revealed its lineup of 103 feature films.

Standout titles include world premieres of a hybrid narrative-documentary film about John DeLorean (starring Alec Baldwin); an Antoine Fuqua-directed documentary about Muhammad Ali; and a portrait of Chelsea Manning; and films starring Margot Robbie, Elijah Wood and Billy Crystal. Christoph Waltz’s directorial debut, Georgetown, offers a cast including Annette Bening, Vanessa Redgrave and Corey Hawkins, in a world premiere.

The always-comprehensive Tribeca offerings also include a must for film buffs and tech geeks, Making Waves: The Art of Sound in Films. The documentary features Walter Murch, Ben Burtt, Gary Rydstrom, George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, Barbra Streisand and Ryan Coogler. As with a large number of screenings at Tribeca, Making Waves will feature a conversation after the end credits, a master-class conversation featuring Burtt and Rydstrom.

The festival, which this year runs April 24 to May 5, also
See full article at Deadline »

Tribeca Film Festival 2019 Lineup Includes New Films from Abel Ferrara, Werner Herzog & More

The 18th edition of Tribeca Film Festival will get underway next month, featuring 103 films from 124 filmmakers, with 50% women-directed films in the three competition sections. Highlights include world premieres directed by Abel Ferrara, Werner Herzog, Christoph Waltz, as well as films by Sebastian Schipper, Mary Harron, Peter Strickland, and Andrew Ahn.

Check out the lineup below for the festival taking place April 24 – May 5.

U.S. Narrative Competition

Tribeca’s U.S. Narrative Competition showcases extraordinary work from breakout independent voices and distinguished filmmaking talent. These ten world premieres will vie for the Founders Award for Best Narrative Feature, Best Screenplay, Best Cinematography, Best Actor, and Best Actress. Last year, the award for Best Narrative Feature went to Kent Jones’ Diane while Jeffrey Wright was awarded Best Actor for his role in O.G. Other previous films from this section include Reed Morano’s Meadowland (2015), Ingrid Jungermann’s Women Who Kill (2016), and
See full article at The Film Stage »

Top 50 Most Anticipated American Independent Films of 2019: #40. Rania Attieh/Daniel Garcia’s Initials S.G.

Initials S.G.

Rania Attieh and Daniel Garcia sanguinely moved into production in January of 2018 with their fourth feature film, Initials S.G. A wink to Serge Gainsbourg, the enigmatic personality of the character embodied by Argentinian actor Diego Peretti is at the core of what is a widely unpredictable storyline. Selected for the Us in Progress in Wrocław, this is produced by the filmmakers alongside Iván Eibuszyc, Shruti Ganguly and Georges Schoucair. The project received some support via the 2018 Music and Sound Design Lab and became film fest darlings with their third feature in 2014’s H. (read review) which was showcased at fest heavyweights Venice, Sundance and Berlin.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Jane Birkin, 1960s Icon, to Get Honor at France's Lumiere Awards

Jane Birkin, 1960s Icon, to Get Honor at France's Lumiere Awards
Actress, singer and style icon Jane Birkin, who rocketed to global stardom in the 1960s, will receive a career honor at this year's Lumiere Awards in France.

The British actress made her first foray into acting playing a naked model in Michelangelo Antonioni's Oscar-nominated Blow Up in 1966, but it was her move to France and her collaboration with Serge Gainsbourg that vaulted her onto the global stage. The duo's song "Je t'aime moi non plus" was banned in several countries for it boldly sexual lyrics, but still hit the top of the charts around ...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter »

2019 Sundance Film Festival Predictions: #38. Rania Attieh & Daniel Garcia – Initials S.G.

Recently featuring their film at the American Film Festival’s Us In Progress in Wroclaw, the team of Rania Attieh and Daniel Garcia look to be at the completion stages with Initials Sg after receiving some Sundance Institute love via the 2018 Music and Sound Design Lab. The duo were winners of the “Someone to Watch Award” at the 2015 Independent Spirit Awards and saw their third feature film H. (read review) receive a rare Venice and then Sundance Film Fest showing. This stars Diego Peretti and includes the surprise presence of a noteworthy U.S tourist.

Gist: An aging Argentine and Serge Gainsbourg (Diego Peretti) wannabe struggles with an acting career he can’t seem to get on track, an affair he doesn’t want and a dead man he didn’t mean to kill.…
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

A Simple Favour review – sublimely silly battle of the moms

In Paul Feig’s comedy-thriller, Anna Kendrick turns detective after her new friend, played by Blake Lively, disappears

Director Paul Feig follows his female-fronted Ghostbusters with this good-natured comedy-thriller about female friendship set in moneyed suburbia. A Simple Favour combines the school-gate politics of Big Little Lies with a Gone Girl-ish mystery, though lacks the edge of either. What it does have up its sleeve is Anna Kendrick and Blake Lively being deliriously funny together in career-high performances as mothers whose kids attend the same school.

Kendrick is Stephanie, an irritatingly perky stay-at-home mom with a YouTube channel on which she demonstrates how to sneak vegetables into kids’ snacks to an audience of a dozen or so. When her son makes a new friend at school, Stephanie is thrown together with the boy’s mother Emily (Lively), a terrifying fashion PR who appears to have it all – fabulous job, designer clothes,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Second Opinion – A Simple Favor (2018)

A Simple Favor, 2018.

Directed by Paul Feig.

Starring Anna Kendrick, Blake Lively, Henry Golding, Linda Cardellini, Andrew Rannells, Jean Smart, Ian Ho, Joshua Satine, Kelly McCormack. Andrew Moodie, Eric Johnson, Sarah Baker, Zach Smadu, and Rupert Friend.

Synopsis:

A woman seeks to uncover the truth behind the disappearance of her best friend.

A Simple Favor plays like a Hitchockian-fever dream propelled by water-cooler gossip and few too many gin martinis. It’s a sun-drenched murder mystery dizzyingly silly and vertiginous in its rather joyfully broad strokes.

Anna Kendrick is Stephanie, a “mummy blogger” and single mother with the sort of enthusiasm for school activities that sends the other parents running to the door. Her bog-standard existence is interrupted by the appearance of the frankly comically glamorous Emily Nelson (Blake Lively). Emily exists in a constant state of martini bliss; her marriage with one-time literary wunderkid Sean (Henry Golding) is all
See full article at Flickeringmyth »
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