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Neil Armstrong Poster

Biography

Jump to: Overview (4)  | Mini Bio (1)  | Spouse (2)  | Trivia (21)  | Personal Quotes (7)

Overview (4)

Born in Wapakoneta, Ohio, USA
Died in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA  (complications following cardiovascular surgery)
Birth NameNeil Alden Armstrong
Height 5' 11" (1.8 m)

Mini Bio (1)

Neil Armstrong was born on August 5, 1930 in Wapakoneta, Ohio, USA as Neil Alden Armstrong. He is known for his work on Kitty Hawk: The Wright Brothers' Journey of Invention (2003), Quantum Quest: A Cassini Space Odyssey (2010) and Footprints on the Moon: Apollo 11 (1969). He was married to Carol Held Knight and Janet Armstrong. He died on August 25, 2012 in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Spouse (2)

Carol Held Knight (12 June 1994 - 25 August 2012) ( his death)
Janet Armstrong (28 January 1956 - 12 April 1994) ( divorced) ( 3 children)

Trivia (21)

NASA Astronaut. Selected in the second group of astronauts. Flew jets during Korean War. Flew X-15 rocket plane. On Gemini 8 in 1966, he flew with Dave Scott conducting the first docking of a manned vehicle with an Agena target vehicle. On Apollo 11 in 1969, with Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, became the first men to land on the moon. Retired from NASA in 1970.
He was a Brother of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity.
Astronauts Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin planted a plaque on the lunar surface on July 20, 1969. It reads: "Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon, July 1969 AD. We came in peace for all mankind.".
He received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 7021 Hollywood Boulevard and Vine Street in Hollywood, California on January 14, 1993.
NASA realized after the Apollo 11 mission had returned to Earth that they had no good pictures of the First Man on the Moon to show to the world. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin said later: "As the sequence of lunar operations evolved, Neil had the camera most of the time, and the majority of pictures taken on the Moon that include an astronaut are of me. It wasn't until we were back on Earth and in the lunar receiving laboratory, looking over the pictures, that we realized there were few pictures of Neil. My fault, perhaps, but we had never simulated this in our training.".
On July 20, 1969, at 10:56 pm EDT, he stepped down from the Lunar Excursion Module Eagle and became the first man to set foot on the moon.
The first man to walk on the Moon also holds the record for the greatest distance between target landing area and actual landing: in March 1966, Gemini 8 came down near Okinawa, but the intended target was the Caribbean, a distance of at least eight and a half thousand miles (13,000+ km).
He had three children: Rick Armstrong (born 1957), Karen (1959-1961) and Mark Armstrong (born 1963).
A crater on the moon is named Armstrong after him.
For the record, it was Neil Armstrong's left foot that first made contact with the surface of the moon.
In 2005, he became embroiled in a bizarre legal dispute with his longtime barber, Marx Sizemore. Armstrong alleged that after cutting some of his hair, Sizemore sold it to a collector for $3000.00 (US) without his knowledge or consent. Armstrong demanded that if Sizemore did not either return the hair in question or donate the proceeds to a charity of Armstrong's choice, he would take legal action against him. Since Sizemore could not get the hair back, he donated the proceeds to the charity of Armstrong's choosing.
He stopped signing autographs in 1994 after finding that many of his signatures were selling for significant amounts of money, and that there were several forgeries in circulation. Since then any requests that were sent to him were answered with a form letter stating that he had stopped signing autographs.
In 1979, while working on his farm in Lebanon, Ohio, he jumped off a grain tractor and his wedding ring was caught in the wheel, severing his ring finger. He managed to calmly collect the finger, pack it in ice and had it reattached by micro surgeons at the Jewish Hospital in Louisville, Kentucky.
He was an honorary member of the American Society of Cinematographers (ASC).
Inducted into the International Aerospace Hall of Fame in 1966.
On a 1962 episode of I've Got a Secret, his parents appeared as contestants (their secret being their son had just become an astronaut), and host Garry Moore asked his mother how she would feel if he became the first person to land on the Moon.
Inducted into the International Space Hall of Fame in 1976.
Inducted into the Ohio Veterans Hall of Fame in 1993.
Inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 1979.
Inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame in 1993.
He was the son of Viola Louise (Engel) and Stephen Koenig Armstrong. His ancestry was over three quarters German, with his other roots being Scots-Irish/Northern Irish, English, Scottish, and Welsh.

Personal Quotes (7)

That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. [First words spoken on the moon. The speech as written by his wife read, "That's one small step for a man, a giant leap for mankind". Unfortunately, he forgot the a in the between for and man, thus changing the meaning.]
It suddenly struck me that that tiny pea, pretty and blue, was the Earth. I put up my thumb and shut one eye, and my thumb blotted out the planet Earth. I didn't feel like a giant. I felt very, very small.
Houston, Tranquillity Base here. The Eagle has landed. [First message to the Earth from the Apollo 11 lunar module Eagle after landing on the Moon, 20 July 1969]
Yeah, I wasn't chosen to be first. I was just chosen to command that flight. Circumstance put me in that particular role. That wasn't planned by anyone.
The important achievement of Apollo was demonstrating that humanity is not forever chained to this planet and our visions go rather further than that and our opportunities are unlimited.
[commenting of the feasibility of a manned mission to Mars] I suspect that even though the various questions are difficult and many, they are not as difficult and many as those we faced when we started the Apollo (space program) in 1961.
In my mind, the important thing was that we got four aluminum legs safely down on the surface of the moon while we were still inside the craft. To me, there wasn't a lot of difference between having ten feet of leg between the bottom of the spacecraft in which we were standing and the surface of the moon, and having one inch of neoprene rubber or plastic on the bottom of our boots touching the lunar surface.

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